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RDWHAHB - What Are You Drinking in 2021?

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7 minutes ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

Cascarillo Amber Ale

Orange aroma (aka Terry's Chocolate orange).  Some caramel with a slightly burnt flavour.

Flavour to match the aroma.

Good level of bitterness, does not linger.  Not much sweetness, which is good.  Carbonation is a bit lacking, which is surprising given how much sugar I primed the keg with. 

A nice, honest and simple beer. I give it a 6/10

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That's an unusual colour Shamus, maybe you are a bit harsh on yourself with the score but then you are the one that is drinking it.

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Last beer photo for the day, promise, this is my first ever wheat beer albeit extract. Black Rock Whispering Wheat with Galaxy infusion. Wow it is so different to anything I have aver made, so light but good body & a lovely clean fresh taste, it lingers. I was actually worried about this one as I had run out of LME & used LDME & dry hopped it, it was a cow to bottle due to clogging up the dispenser but it turned out fine. It was bottled 3rd June, young yes but I wanted to try it.

Cheers All.

Phil

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20 minutes ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

Carbonation is a bit lacking, which is surprising given how much sugar I primed the keg with. 

I am just starting to look at kegging and was interest that the keg was primed with sugar and that carbonation was lacking,

I thought that the CO2 to the keg from the CO2 bottle looked after the level of CO2 and there would not be a requirement to add sugar to the keg.

Is the addition of sugar to the keg for natural carbonation before adding CO2

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21 hours ago, Norris! said:

I got my results back from the IPA comp. I did fair on the NEIPA but pretty horribly on the American IPA. It didn't taste right to me and I shouldn't Of sent it but I felt that it came right...obviously not, it got 17, 21 and 22 out of 50. That isn't good.

The NEIPA did slightly better, 31, 33 and 34 out of 50. It had lost a fair bit of aroma and had grassiness to it was the main hits. I thought that was fair feedback and on point. I am disappointed but pretty happy with the feedback which will help me Brew better. Live and learn and brew on.

I attached one score sheet of the 3 judges for the NEIPA, the medium score for that beer, to show the main ups and downs clearly.

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Good to get feedback though, good or bad.

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18 minutes ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

Cascarillo Amber Ale

Orange aroma (aka Terry's Chocolate orange).  Some caramel with a slightly burnt flavour.

Flavour to match the aroma.

Good level of bitterness, does not linger.  Not much sweetness, which is good.  Carbonation is a bit lacking, which is surprising given how much sugar I primed the keg with. 

A nice, honest and simple beer. I give it a 6/10

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looks great Shamus,  but it puzzles me why you created more effort in priming the keg with sugar   rather then  just using CO2  

i get it if you  had no room in the kegorater or keezer   and you wanter  to natuarually carb around 20 degree's

and even then i wouldnt have worried as long as ya had the keg purged  of oxygen  you still could have carbed it up with co2 once in the fridge all though it may have taken another 5-7 days to carb up on set and forget..

over all  it looks rather tasty

 

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2 hours ago, RDT2 said:

Just watching the footy trying my Irish Red kegged on Friday, kind of reminds of a Munich Dunkel a little bit has quite a bit of Caraaroma in it, very happy with colour and clarity has a touch of roast or toast 🤣I think, nicely balanced though and very drinkable. 

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Looks suberb.

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The Dunkelweizen - Monday night - but is a holiday in NSW so thought I deserved a beer ; )  Lovely creamy top!

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Just now, Graubart said:

The Dunkelweizen - Monday night - but is a holiday in NSW so thought I deserved a beer ; )  Lovely creamy top!

Lovely Graubster who cares if it is a holiday or not, go for it. Enjoy. 🍻

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10 hours ago, iBooz2 said:

I like the layout of that book you have there Stquinto.  Its in a very easy format that sums up the whole recipe except it has no mention of yeast or ferment profile, is that on another page?

Am going to design a spreadsheet for my recipes in that exact same format and use them as run sheets on brew day as it has everything needed for quick reference.

Whats the book called please?

Cheers - AL

This is the book:

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It doesn't give a yeast recommendation for each recipe. It does have a  chapter on yeast but only a couple of suggestions for dried yeast Safale S-04 and Windsor. This is the section :

 

 

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I used Notto though. Fermented out a treat - after a few hours it was bubbling away like a dodgy curry...

 

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5 hours ago, jamiek86 said:

@stquinto your pils always look nice in the glass obviously summer over there how long has that one been aged and what temps?

Hey Jamie, I bottled it on 1st January. I'd started it on 20th December, fermented at 13 - 14° in the garage.

I kept it in the boiler room at around 22° after bottling for 4 weeks.

It took at least another 6 - 8 weeks to get rid of the yeasty - homebrew aftertaste but it came out well. Next winter I'll brew at least two side by side, maybe play around with the hops although they are fine as they are.

 

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On 6/13/2021 at 9:40 AM, CLASSIC said:

I showed him the responses on my post re: Another happy customer prior to his surgery last Wednesday night as he was overwhelmed & now is starting to believe my ravings about what a great bunch of blokes (& Christina ) we have on this forum, so Cheers All.

Glad to hear it went well for your mate Phil. Bottoms up !

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3 minutes ago, stquinto said:

Glad to hear it went well for your mate Phil. Bottoms up !

As the Saint - me too - and @CLASSIC Classic please pass on greetings from us - and a 'gute Besserung' 👍

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2 minutes ago, Graubart said:

As the Saint - me too - and @CLASSIC Classic please pass on greetings from us - and a 'gute Besserung' 👍

danke schreiben

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28 minutes ago, stquinto said:

Hey Jamie, I bottled it on 1st January. I'd started it on 20th December, fermented at 13 - 14° in the garage.

I kept it in the boiler room at around 22° after bottling for 4 weeks.

It took at least another 6 - 8 weeks to get rid of the yeasty - homebrew aftertaste but it came out well. Next winter I'll brew at least two side by side, maybe play around with the hops although they are fine as they are.

 

did you leave them in boiler room whole time or lagered somewhere?

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86 days pils 17 days in keg first time in while had glass stain as drink it gave couple good clean with bicarb soda 

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10 minutes ago, jamiek86 said:

86 days pils 17 days in keg first time in while had glass stain as drink it gave couple good clean with bicarb soda 

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good head retention i hope that continued

was that a 1st pour from the keg?

i would make  the barperson  pour a new one  if i seen an icecream like that lol

not having shot   at you a 2 finger pour is acceptable in my opinion unless you have fat fingers

the beer look great thou

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Posted (edited)

@ozdevil tried the keg once before I.think but tap was warm so came out foamy. I don't mind a good head on my home brew I also wouldn't accept that in a pub. 

it lost it bit at bottom was harder get bottom properly I need a long soft brush instead of hard brush one.

Edited by jamiek86

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1 hour ago, jamiek86 said:

did you leave them in boiler room whole time or lagered somewhere?

I lagered them for a month in the boiler room (approx. 21°). then in the garge for another month or so (approx 14° to 16°)

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My Cascadian dark ale pimped from a Woolies draught can. 100g of late Centennial, fantastic

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24 minutes ago, jamiek86 said:

@ozdevil tried the keg once before I.think but tap was warm so came out foamy. I don't mind a good head on my home brew I also wouldn't accept that in a pub. 

it lost it bit at bottom was harder get bottom properly I need a long soft brush instead of hard brush one.

i thought that was a 1st pour  mate, wasnt having a shot  as that happens to us all

mind you some people think its fine to have icecreams and some of these have double scoops 
and think its the only way to have beer.  more froth the better and less beer  

i dont see why they want huge heads on beer

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@ozdevil because it always settles back in I like a nice big head on a home brew I reckon as collapses back in so does flavour 

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1 hour ago, Pickles Jones said:

I am just starting to look at kegging and was interest that the keg was primed with sugar and that carbonation was lacking,

I thought that the CO2 to the keg from the CO2 bottle looked after the level of CO2 and there would not be a requirement to add sugar to the keg.

Is the addition of sugar to the keg for natural carbonation before adding CO2

You are right Pickles, the CO2 from the gas bottle carbonates the keg.  You do not need to add sugar as part of the carbonating process. 

You can carbonate a keg with sugar.  Think of it as a giant bottle.  See my reasoning below for doing it, in this case.

1 hour ago, ozdevil said:

looks great Shamus,  but it puzzles me why you created more effort in priming the keg with sugar   rather then  just using CO2  

i get it if you  had no room in the kegorater or keezer   and you wanter  to natuarually carb around 20 degree's

and even then i wouldnt have worried as long as ya had the keg purged  of oxygen  you still could have carbed it up with co2 once in the fridge all though it may have taken another 5-7 days to carb up on set and forget..

over all  it looks rather tasty

 

I almost always keg straight after cold crashing.  Therefore, the beer is already cold.  It is easier to get cold beer carbonated with CO2.  I did this with a Dry Irish Stout on Saturday.  24 hours at 40psi in the kegerator.  Drank the first beer on Sunday night.

This time I did not have a spot in the kegerator for the Cascarillo when it was kegged.  I knew I would not have a spot for it for at least two weeks.  So I decided to naturally carbonate it with sugar.  That way, after the two weeks, all I have to do is get it cold and it would be ready to drink.  Otherwise, I would have to leave the keg at ambient temperature until a space was free.  Then put it in, leave it for 12-24 hours to get it cold and then do the 24 hours at 40psi treatment.  I think that the effort to prime the keg with sugar is quicker than having to leave it overnight in the kegerator to get cold.

I think that the lack of carbonation may relate to being effective with my efforts to keep oxygen out of the keg.  Yeast needs oxygen to do it's thing.  With minimal oxygen in the keg, the sugar might not be able to carbonate the beer as well as expected.

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20 minutes ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

You are right Pickles, the CO2 from the gas bottle carbonates the keg.  You do not need to add sugar as part of the carbonating process. 

You can carbonate a keg with sugar.  Think of it as a giant bottle.  See my reasoning below for doing it, in this case.

I almost always keg straight after cold crashing.  Therefore, the beer is already cold.  It is easier to get cold beer carbonated with CO2.  I did this with a Dry Irish Stout on Saturday.  24 hours at 40psi in the kegerator.  Drank the first beer on Sunday night.

This time I did not have a spot in the kegerator for the Cascarillo when it was kegged.  I knew I would not have a spot for it for at least two weeks.  So I decided to naturally carbonate it with sugar.  That way, after the two weeks, all I have to do is get it cold and it would be ready to drink.  Otherwise, I would have to leave the keg at ambient temperature until a space was free.  Then put it in, leave it for 12-24 hours to get it cold and then do the 24 hours at 40psi treatment.  I think that the effort to prime the keg with sugar is quicker than having to leave it overnight in the kegerator to get cold.

I think that the lack of carbonation may relate to being effective with my efforts to keep oxygen out of the keg.  Yeast needs oxygen to do it's thing.  With minimal oxygen in the keg, the sugar might not be able to carbonate the beer as well as expected.

fair enough Shamus  , i wish i had your problem lol

i'm struggling to keep up with 1 keg but thats just lazy me.

i really need to start brewing hard i think  as i have 4 keg kegaroter with 4 taps and only 1 gets used lol

so i dont have kegs banking up



 

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Well after a couple of Red Ales Swapped to my Pilsner nearly been lagering for a month now and it so beautiful, clean and refreshing. I am now a big fan of S189 but in saying that it’s the first time I have used a starter. I have W34/70 which i have used before in the fridge so will make my next Pilsner with that using a starter. I am also impressed with MT Hood so nice. 🍻 Can’t remember if it was Lusty that was singing it’s praises, it was half price at the home brew store I only bought a small pack should of grabbed a large one!

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5 hours ago, CLASSIC said:

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Yep that beer sure looks nice Phil. Happy hour? how about inviting all your mates around for a taste. ha..ha.. 

When I have a commercial Coopers Pale Ale and the like, yep the barman or I roll the bottle along the bar before opening to get that proper Coopers Pale Ale taste.  But my bottled brews all have sediment in them.  Some have a tight packed sediment that is hard to dislodge with a normal pour but others the sediment can be seen to move down the bottles as you pour into a jug.  I stop when its near the neck and tip the rest of the bottle, maybe 10 mm or so.   I never upend or roll mine as it would cloud the beer with bottle trub.

It could be that most of my bottles are lagers brewed with W34/70 and they were left at ambient for a couple of months then lagered at 2 C for several months more until now.  Dunno most of my lagers have been in the bottle since July 2020.  A lot of them are the same recipe (K&K) at that time.

What recipe was that beer in the pic?  What yeast was it and what was the conditioning routine?  I.E. time in the bottle re temp etc.

And I don't think you cold crash your batches either so its all very interesting.

 

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