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  • Posts

    • If you fermented in a sealed container without any pressure release, the thing would blow up. So I'd say unsealed is a requirement. I have two fermenters, both airlock style ones. My main one had the grommet perish ages ago which I noted above. The airlock never bubbled on it anyway, but since the grommet perished I just put tape over the hole and back the lid off slightly. Gas escapes, nothing gets in. It's opaque but the lid is see through so I can still observe foam/condensation forming. I can also see the foam through the side.  Point being, airlocks aren't necessary and they shouldn't be relied on as a sign of activity because 1, any leak in a seal stops them bubbling, and 2, they can bubble for reasons other than fermentation. All they really indicate is gas passing through, and while a lot of times it will be from fermentation, it's not always. Ignore it, look for visible signs and use your hydrometer.
    • My standard ones are about 5-6%, but mashed higher around 67. I don't think I'd ever make a beer with 20% crystal. I'm also led to believe that when crystal is mashed, the enzymes in the base malt reduce its influence compared to steeping it on its own where no enzymes are present. I haven't bothered testing this theory as I'm happy with the current outcomes. 
    • Just following the recipe in the charcuterie book mate, not sure what the boiling is for but anyway. Although I obviously leave it in there longer than two days like it says. Maybe their loins are different but it never fully penetrates in two days. 
    • I'm not sure where you are getting these recipes from either. Most IPAs are low on crystal malts, 2 to 5% or so.  Otherwise you don't get the dryness that you mention.  SNPA is about 10%, and there are beers with more than 10%, but 20% is not common at all, from what I've seen of searching recipes over the last ten years. 
    • I have a grainfather and if it is anything like that it is easy. AG brewing is pretty simple. Go for it and learn as you go.
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