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It's Kegging Time 2019

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33 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

That's where mine's set as well, no foaming and the beer lines are about half that length, however I have flow control taps and the beer is colder which helps.

Yeah I just deal with it. Sometimes it is a perfect pour but I always have to hold the glass on an angle. I see some videos of people who put the cup on the flat below the tap and just fill it while it sits on the kegerator/drip tray. My glass would fill half with foam if I did that.

Edited by MitchellScott
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So would mine, I always angle it too. The font fan helps though, especially if I actually remember to turn it on when I go back to work in the arvo. Definitely less foaming when it's been running a while. 

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2 hours ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

So would mine, I always angle it too. The font fan helps though, especially if I actually remember to turn it on when I go back to work in the arvo. Definitely less foaming when it's been running a while. 

I suspect some of my foaming is also because the lines sit on top of the kegs. I'm sure if I dropped the bunch of line near the floor of the fridge it would help keep it colder in the lines but its all effort that gives little in return..... If its going warm in the lines I'm taking to long to finish a beer 😛

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20 minutes ago, MitchellScott said:

I suspect some of my foaming is also because the lines sit on top of the kegs.

I get SOME foaming SOMETIMES.

My line sit on my kegs in a Keezer.
I could fix it by having a fan blowing the air around but IGAF.

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19 hours ago, PaddyBrew2 said:

the perfect pour is done at a 45 degree angle. 

What is at 45°? Tap, glass, barman, floor, bar, clock....?

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On 11/19/2019 at 8:05 PM, Ben 10 said:

I get SOME foaming SOMETIMES.

My line sit on my kegs in a Keezer.
I could fix it by having a fan blowing the air around but IGAF.

Benny don't you think you might mean IDGAF?   ; )

Edited by Bearded Burbler
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Need some help on beer line length , starting to build a keezer with parts from my kegerator, will be replacing all the lines and I have new 5mm ID / 8mm OD hose for my kegs I run my kegs at 12 psi and will be running my keezer at 2 degrees , had a few issues with my lines freezing in my kegerator set up but i think this was due to hoses being quiet messy and touching the back of the fridge in places , any tips on avoiding this in a keezer set up

Edited by Stoobs
Wrong spelling

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Coil the lines up, hold in place with cable ties and sit them on top of the kegs. Should keep them away from any cooling plates. I do this in my kegerator and don't get frozen lines, it's also set colder. 

It did partially freeze a bottle the other day but it was right up the back. 

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4 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

I do this in my kegerator and don't get frozen lines, it's also set colder. 

What temp do you run mate ? 

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12 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Coil the lines up, hold in place with cable ties and sit them on top of the kegs

That's what I do. And run mine at -1.5°

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Yeah ok I'll sort out something similar and see how it goes , what length line do you lads run or what is a good starting point

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29 minutes ago, Stoobs said:

what length line do you lads run

3 from memory. Reg set to 12/ 14 psi. Manifold splitting into 6 kegs.

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Mine is set to zero. Lines are 2.2 metres but I have flow control taps. I'd start with 4 metres and trim as required. Much easier than starting with it too short.

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34 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Mine is set to zero. Lines are 2.2 metres but I have flow control taps. I'd start with 4 metres and trim as required. Much easier than starting with it too short.

Yeah ok , I understand that what your going for is a well poored beer so in saying that is it as simple as poor a beer with 4m line and then trim say 100mm per beer until you get the desired result?

Edited by Stoobs

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Pretty much yeah. You don't want the lines too short because it just foams everywhere, too long and the pour is too slow. It's just cheaper, quicker and easier to trim to the right length. 

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51 minutes ago, Stoobs said:

Yeah ok , I understand that what your going for is a well poored beer so in saying that is it as simple as poor a beer with 4m line and then trim say 100mm per beer until you get the desired result?

Agree.  My supplier advised 3.5m which has been good.  Next I will buy 4 or 4.5 and work my way back.

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Righto thanks for the help everyone , any other tips on building a keezer through experience of others ?

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 I had a 3 tap keg king kegerator , and have just upgraded to a keezer and have finished the build,  I have a couple of questions and problems my old kegerator had 4m lines the lines were 4mm ID run it  at 0 degrees celcious and 12 psi it poored a great beer that was well carbonated and if you poored a pint you could see the bubbles working through the beer until I finished it  , now my keezer is set at -1.5 it has 4m lines and the lines are 5mm ID and  the psi is set at 12 the problem I'm having is it's poorinng a beer that looks good but doesn't have the same carbination level as a beer poored out of my previous kegerator , I've shortened one line to 3.5m to see if it would help and it hasn't,  my question is can you have a beer line to long and can it reduce the carbination levels and does having 1mm bigger ID affect the length I should have in the line 

Edited by Stoobs

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Hi Stoobs.

Line length & line diameter do have a bearing on how well a beer pours. Check out the following link as it will explain just about everything you need to know about balancing the contributing aspects of keg line setup, pressure vs line length & diameter etc.

Keg Line Length Balancing – The Science of Draft Beer

On a personal note, if your beer poured well from a 0°C base then I would run your temp controlled keezer at the same temp. At -1.5°C it's probably having a real hard time coming out of solution, thus affecting carbonation release. Personally that is too low for me, even in Summer. If you're making hoppy beer, you'd have a hard time smelling & tasting their prominent characteristics at that low temp. In the summer months I run my temp controller with a variance between 2°C & 5°C & the actual beer temp would be closer to 2°C than it would be to 5°C, 85%+ of the time.

I hope that helps.

Lusty.

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37 minutes ago, Beerlust said:

Hi Stoobs.

Line length & line diameter do have a bearing on how well a beer pours. Check out the following link as it will explain just about everything you need to know about balancing the contributing aspects of keg line setup, pressure vs line length & diameter 

Cheers lusty I've read all that and shortened one line to 2.5m however I think maybe my keezer temp was reading wrong for starters as I had the temp controller thermostat just hanging in there and have since put it in a 3 litre bottle of water so I'm hoping maybe the temp had a bit to do with the variations so I'm calling it a night as I've drunk 2 at to much beer trying to sort all this out  , I have 2 lines at 4m one at 2.5m and one at 3.5m andam going to leave it for tomorrowand play around with it all again 

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Woke this morning to an empty gas bottle. Only have it three weeks. So pi$$ed off. I have my NEIPA and Witbeir kegged. The third keg is empty so I haven’t the gas connect on it. Surely this wouldn’t leak if not connected.

anyone have any advice on how to source the leak ? 
this is my gas line set up

 

A1268461-8CA8-4FE2-81C4-BBB21FF1BF5B.jpeg

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Soapy water or starsan on all potential leak points while the gas is on. The disconnects are meant to prevent gas going through them when they aren't connected to anything. 

I used to have the same type of setup for my gas lines and while I had no leaks I got sick of it and changed to a manifold. Much easier to turn gas on and off to individual kegs, and since it's mounted in the bar I don't have to open the door and take gas lines off the kegs themselves. 

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Found the culprit. Bastarding duotight fitting with a broken thread on the third gas line which wasn’t connected. Did trial and error with all the connects and this is the one that air pi$$ed through. Only have two kegs connected now as only have two full. Did the soapy water test after tightening all fittings and no bubbles. Fingers crossed 

168D05CE-084A-472E-9614-AB4CF7131EAB.jpeg

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