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Beerlust

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Everything posted by Beerlust

  1. Beerlust

    Improving

    If you ferment the brew @ 18°C+ using W34/70 it will likely take on other unwanted connotations outside the expected flavours of a typical lager beer. A common phrase used to describe a lager yeast based brew fermented @ ale temperatures is called a "Steam Beer". It tastes quite different to a typical lager beer. If you can get your ferment temp down to at least 15°C & be able to hold it there for at least the first 3-4 days of the primary ferment you will achieve a decent lager-type flavour in the final beer. If you are able to achieve the 15°C mark, allow the beer temp to rise to at least 18°C after 6-7 days for what is known as a diacetyl rest. The diacetyl rest is necessary for lager yeast fermented beers to remove a heavy butterscotch-like flavour created by the lager strains as a byproduct of being fermented at lower temperatures. Diacetyl traits can also be removed by ageing your beer in the bottle at temperatures of 18°C & above for a reasonable period of time. Cheers & best of luck with the brew, Lusty.
  2. Beerlust

    BREW DAY!! WATCHA' GOT, EH!? 2019

    HI Joolbag. The great thing about brewing a Saison is you don't need temperature control. It is a beer that can be brewed under ambient conditions (even during our hot months here in AUS). I admit I've not ever tracked an uncontrolled temp brew inside a brew fridge before but I can only assume it would not allow much dissipation (for a better word) of exothermic heat being generated by the yeast due to the insulation properties of the fridge. Saison yeasts produce exothermic heat in bucket loads for longer primary fermentation periods than standard yeasts due to their high attenuation. So by placing your Saison brew in a brew fridge you are effectively retaining heat as it's produced & not allowing ambient fluctuations to limit the rise in temperature being created exothermically from the yeast while it is actively fermenting. Get your pitching temp right & then allow the brew to free-rise under ambient conditions with these beers. I always check the 7 day weather forecast before beginning the primary ferment on one of these brews as the ambient conditions will have some influence. If the weather looks like a stinker for a few days early then start your brew wort at a lower temperature prior to pitching the yeast to allow for the obvious accelerated temp rise. Expect a bit of funk in your brew Joolbag. Funk is good though in a Saison. Disco Stu (Bring back the funk) would be proud. A little planning ahead, be smart early, & they are one of the easiest beers to make as a home brewer (IMHO). Cheers, Lusty.
  3. Beerlust

    What's in your fermenter? 2019

    I used to be one of those naysayers! Haha!....until I learned better. There's an old saying..."Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned." I have a modern twist on that... Hell hath no fury like a home brewer whose yeast fails! 🤣 Cheers, Lusty.
  4. Beerlust

    What's in your fermenter? 2019

    I removed the chux dry hop bag containing a mix of Cascade, Columbus, Riwaka & Simcoe this morning before work. I squeezed all the aromatic liquid back into the brew. It smelled really awesome actually. It could be a combo to follow up on. If I wasn't in a bit of a hurry to get to work I may well have eaten the chux hop bag rather than binning it! 🤤 The brew is in cold crash mode now & will be kegged this coming Sunday. I plan to smoke a big hunk of pork shoulder on the day as well so a few pints of this from the keg along with the pork will be bloody terrific I reckon. Cheers & good brewing, Lusty.
  5. Beerlust

    BREW DAY!! WATCHA' GOT, EH!? 2019

    Bold claim calling it "Extra Special" when you haven't even tasted it yet. Best of luck with it mate. It looked really inviting. Cheers, Lusty.
  6. Beerlust

    BREW DAY!! WATCHA' GOT, EH!? 2019

    ...to the point of riddles. It's like, "I CBF posting anything, but I really should say something". Lusty.
  7. Beerlust

    What's in your fermenter? 2019

    S-04 is a British style yeast, & quite a vigorous fermenter. Produces nice bright beers. It is notorious for being a little sluggish toward the end of primary ferment, even stalling sometimes, but I found if you keep your ferment temp at around 20-21°C it ferments out quite well. Cheers, Lusty.
  8. Beerlust

    What's in your fermenter? 2019

    Agreed. US-05 is classed as a medium flocker because of this. It's partly why I use it in preference to Nottingham in my pale ales. I've used Nottigham in my pales & made the pseudo-lagers with it & it just seemed to strip the shite out of everything in those styles of beer in direct comparison. Cheers, Lusty.
  9. Beerlust

    What's in your BBQ 2019?

    Hi guys. Given the number of posts across quite a few threads I thought this might make for a good off-beer brewing topic. I got a smoker for Xmas & have been dying to put it to use. Today was the first day since Xmas that was safe enough to do so using charcoal. 2 x 1.7kg rolled slabs of beef. I rubbed one with a pretty standard rub I would use if regularly roasting & the other with "McCormick's Grill Mates "Smokin Texas Slow and Low BBQ Rub". First ever time using a natural fuel source at home for cooking that tore my hair out trying to get to a good temp & then regulate, but I eventually got there. I used a mix of hickory & mesquite wood chips for imparting a smoke flavour into the meat along with the spiced rubs. I'm sorry I don't have a post-cook pic as I & those here with me were so anxious to taste the meat once it was cooked I had carved a good whack of it up & we had eaten about half of it before I remembered to take a pic! LOL Both pieces turned out well & with the desired smoke ring & flavour. The American based McCormick's rub was the more flavourful of the two. I've used a couple of their range before on pieces of meat & they are really terrific. Cheers & good BBQ'ing! Lusty.
  10. Beerlust

    What's in your fermenter? 2019

    I'm in agreement. High flocking yeasts definitely help with beer clarity, & given enough time will drop a lot of particulate on their own. The trouble with the real high flocker yeast strains is they often strip a lot of malt & hop derived flavour when they do their thing that improves clarity. Nottingham is a beast of yeast, is ultra reliable, & has very high attenuation. The trouble with that is it strips a lot of hop & malt derived flavour in doing so. I don't use it with my pale ales as a rule because of this. It is very good & well suited with brewing heavier malted, higher ABV, & pseudo lager beers though as the stripping affect is less noticeable & the high attenuation property of the yeast is actually very helpful in these scenarios. Just my 2 cents, Lusty.
  11. Beerlust

    What's in your fermenter? 2019

    I cold "crash" my pale ales for only 2-3 days. I do it mainly to get the beer cold for better C02 absorption on kegging day. The beer cold conditions in the keg & clarifies even further over the period of drinking it. The only beers I bother to cold "condition" prior to kegging are lagers & even then, it's only for a further 7-8 days in the FV usually. Cheers, Lusty.
  12. Beerlust

    Barrel aging homebrew

    Yep it is Chad's recipe I am talking about. The oak chips used were American oak chips & they already had plenty of flavour without the need for soaking them in whiskies etc. But you could certainly do that if you wanted. I liked the flavour so much I used it in an oaked vanilla Porter beer I did a couple of times a few years ago. Cheers, Lusty.
  13. Beerlust

    What's in your BBQ 2019?

    Looks really good mate & I'm hearin' ya in regard to the need for loading the meat up with rubs prior to smoking. My fav pork rotisserie marinade is relatively simple. I'm in my infancy smoker use-wise & this Tennessee rub is very simple too. McCormick's have done their homework on these rubs. Cheap as, & ridiculously good flavour-wise (IMHO). I'm loving experimenting so far. Lusty.
  14. Beerlust

    What's in your BBQ 2019?

    Thanks mate. I have a very good marinade for pork in prep for use on my rotisserie but want to try the American feel on this bit of Pork in the smoker for something different. Sorry to keep bringing them up & sounding a little generic, but the McCormick's "Grill Mates Tennessee Smokehouse BBQ rub" is really good on this type of meat. I've used it on pork already. Probably slightly better used on ribs, but I want to coat a full shoulder in the stuff & see how it turns out. Cheers & good BBQ'ing, Lusty.
  15. Beerlust

    Plaato v Tilt

    Crazy overload for home brewing IMHO, but if you like this level of observation while you're fermenting then go for it I say. PB2's BEER TRIANGLE: Thorough Sanitation + Fresh Ingredients + Appropriate Ferment Temp = QUALITY BEER While I can control & track those 3 elements, I don't have much else to worry about from brew to brew (IMHO). In the last couple of days I've commented on posts revolved around commercial practices for brewing beer & the safety mechanisms followed to reproduce these beers over & over. Understand that many of these procedures & practices adopted by commercial breweries are built upon minimizing failure to the enth degree, to the point of completely eliminating the chance of it with their processes of making beer. Large scale commercial breweries ferment giga-litres of beer per batch so can't take the chance of it failing in any way so overcompensate in many areas to eliminate that chance of failure. Over the years I've listened to many home brewers at the higher levels that align themselves with this commercial philosophy, then preach it to those of all levels within the home brew ranks as some sort of "Must do". On a home-brew scale, much of it is unnecessary & a waste of your time. At the end of the day it is your choice about who & what you wish to believe. My position & view is simply one of many available for you to read. Cheers & good brewing, Lusty.
  16. Beerlust

    moving fermentor

    Before I put my foot in my mouth, can you provide a link to this "website video"? Personally I don't have a problem moving it, but I would need to know why &/or when I'm moving it to assess the risks involved. Cheers, Lusty.
  17. Beerlust

    What's in your BBQ 2019?

    Looks great mate. Plenty of smoke looking infusion in that! You're a beast with this smoking deal. Love your posts in this thread. I picked up a custom cut piece of pork shoulder I pre-ordered from my local butcher earlier today. He's done a terrific job on the cut I reckon. Gonna smoke it on Sunday. Can't wait. Cheers & good BBQ'ing, Lusty.
  18. Beerlust

    Barrel aging homebrew

    The oak chips have often come from wine, bourbon, or scotch based whiskey barrel sources. Some are pure chippings (I think? ) If you plan to use oak chips, ask your supplier where they are sourced from/how they are produced. In most LHBS's the guy may not immediately know 'off the cuff', but can usually find out for you. I've brewed an IPA recipe designed by a former member of this forum that uses oak chips & it seriously blew my mind the first time I brewed it & drank it. It is a terrific beer recipe to brew from a kit base or otherwise. Incredible depth of flavour. Cheers, Lusty.
  19. Beerlust

    Flavour/Alcohol increase.

    Once you have the brew wort between approx. 40°C & your ideal yeast pitching temperature, it is at it's most vulnerable. Growth rate charts of bacterial spoilage suggest as much. Through minimizing the time-frame wort sits in this temperature range without yeast present has pretty much eliminated infected brews from my Brewhouse. On this front, I think I'm a good 4yrs+ clean now. (Sounds like an AA meeting speech! 🤣) Understanding how problems occur & how to deal with them is often cheaper & more time efficient than blanket processing problems with unnecessary procedures. There are examples of this everywhere in all sorts of manufacturing & the production of goods. Just my 2 cents, Lusty.
  20. Beerlust

    What's in your fermenter? 2019

    Your mix sounds good mate to throw the hue. I would definitely appreciate a pic of this brew once you have it in the glass. On the flip-side about CaraRed, I'm not afraid to use larger weights of these lowish EBC (approx. 50) crystal malts in my Pale Ales. It's a fallacy that many of these lowish crystal malts carry heavy sweetness. In all honesty, those around & below this EBC level don't carry a lot of sweetness at all. If you get your hopping balance right when using larger weights of crystal malts around this EBC level you don't get noticeable sweetness, just a fuller malty palate than you would if using more base malt in it's place. It's a contentious subject that I'm happy to accept brewers seem to see differently. Interestingly a few of us managed to convince Capt. to whack about 500gms of CaraMalt (or something equivalent) into a recent brew he has started (I think? ). I'll be interested to hear his thoughts on that once on the pour as I'm certainly an advocate of using these types of crystal grains at these weights if trying to create American styled pale ale & IPA's. Cheers, Lusty.
  21. Beerlust

    Stuck ferment......what they look like?

    Hi Mitch. I took the liberty of looking through some of your previous posts to find out what yeast you are using for this current brew, & I see it is US-05. Your description of how your brew has behaved (thus far) is pretty much spot on for how this yeast ferments in most situations. It is quite vigorous during the noticeable part of fermentation but does often take a few extra days to clean up & finish off the last few gravity points. A hard, thin krausen is typical with this yeast strain & it often hangs around for quite a while before dropping unlike most other strains. In the past PB2 has suggested using a decent long stirring spoon & giving quite a few whacks on the outside of the fermenter around the krausen height to dis-lodge it. As has already been mentioned, your specific gravity readings with your hydrometer will tell you when the brew has finished fermenting. Day 6-7 is a good time to take your first. P.S. I'm still waiting for the release of your demonstration video for this krausen dislodgement Paul. Cheers, Lusty.
  22. Beerlust

    What's in your fermenter? 2019

    I'm hearin' ya John. More a hue I'm after than a deep red. I just wanted to avoid sweetness from a grain like CaraAroma, & roasty carryover from grains like roasted barley or black patent etc. Even though this one will be a fail on colour I plan to persist down this path for a little bit out of sheer interest. For my next attempt I'll either use a dash of roasted barley/black patent or really up the CaraRed next time. At least after this brew, I'll know what CaraRed tastes like to know how far I can probably push the weight without creating a cloying sweetness. It's all just a bit of fun learning from my end. Cheers & good brewing, Lusty.
  23. Beerlust

    BREW DAY!! WATCHA' GOT, EH!? 2019

    Each state has it's own guidelines & award for the granting of long service leave entitlements. The following is from my state governing body (SafeWork SA)... Know your rights mate. Cheers, Lusty.
  24. Beerlust

    ESVA ROTM

    You must like very spicy food then John?
  25. Beerlust

    dry hopping golding

    It's OK mate, I only managed two brews between late November & now as well. We'll let each other off this time I reckon. Cheers & good brewing, Lusty.
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