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Going to be like shooting Bambi saying this, but I'm sacking us05. 100% strike rate problems or infections the four seperate times I've used it. One complete poison batch, 3 other with hints of the poison, recent batches dr smurto and Earle's stone and wood. Different fermenters, yeast packets. Controlled fermentations at 18.  Only had one other infection with 40 other batches with other yeasts. 

Something I'm doing Us05 doesn't like, we are not compatible, goodbye for good, have a nice life 

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Sorry to hear about the infected batches. WOFTAM. What do you think you will use as a substitute?

 

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27 minutes ago, BlueBru said:

Sorry to hear about the infected batches. WOFTAM. What do you think you will use as a substitute?

 

Nottingham, even  the kit yeasts always easy to work with and reliable

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Very sad to hear it Bennysbrew.

I  run US-05 almost always now. A rehydate first, then 3 generations of slurry. I brew at 18c through to cold crash.

Love the sweeter finish it provides over the likes of Nottingham although I  reckon Nottingham is a great dry yeast.

Just looking at my records; 14 of my 63 batches were US-05, either rehydrated or slurried. Not a problem in any.

I have always used StellaSan sanitizer, steeps and mashes tap water (boil process), FV top-ups filtered rain/tank water.

Sorry to see another 'anecdotal' problem with US-05 because it is my favorite taste. I will definitely post on here if I ever have a problem with it.

Cheers

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Yeah not a problem in god knows how many batches either. Only negative from US05 is its floculation for me and it is a little plain but thats it

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Can’t beat Nottingham in my opinion mate.

Ferments hard and fast, and drops like a rock!

Finishes a bit dry with all my ales at 1.010-1.011 max, no matter what crystal malts etc I put in the brew.

Cheers

James

 

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Oh I’ve finally decided my future lies

Beyond the US-05

 

Now I have this song stuck in my head.

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It’s weird that some people have big troubles with US05 and some have none. 

I haven’t had any issues and I think it’s a great yeast. 

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7 hours ago, Beer Baron said:

It’s weird that some people have big troubles with US05 and some have none. 

I haven’t had any issues and I think it’s a great yeast. 

I haven’t either. Other than being the “Magnum” of the yeast world, it does its job well for me.

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Very strange that it's the yeast causing this..... Doesn't really make sense.

It could be all in your head! but there are definitely other great yeasts out there that will do the job.

I have had a few good batches with Mangrove Jack M44 US West Coast Yeast.

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Yeah never had a problem with it either except one batch due to it being reused too many times. Horribly phenolic that batch, but otherwise it's been fine. I only really use it in APA but sometimes stouts too. 

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, bennysbrew said:

Something I'm doing Us05 doesn't like, we are not compatible, goodbye for good, have a nice life 

Welcome to the club.  I think that's three of us now?  My issues with US-05 are well documented here as are those of another member Christina.

In a way, my troubles with 05 were a blessing in disguise because I eventually moved onto other superior strains, most notably Nottingham which others have already mentioned above.  Nottingham gets on with the job quickly and drops like a ton of bricks when done, and has the added bonus that it can condition my bottles in mid Winter with it's low temp spec of 10ºC. 

Quite recently I used Mangrove Jacks M36, as has also been named, which is looking very promising too and one I will reuse for the next few batches.   

Quite aside from the particular phenolic issues I was having with US-05 I have to say I'm at a total loss as to why it is so popular considering the superior attributes of other strains.  It's a favourite among many I know but I personally found it laggy at times,  a little lethargic on the ferment and not a particularly great flocculator either.  

😎   

Edited by BlackSands
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Interesting point about Nottingham bottle conditioning in winter. That's a big plus. I  must admit my move to mostly US-05 has been during winter where I  have needed to pay particular attention to my bottle conditioning and using heat sources for 2 weeks.

Also my move to mostly US-05 has coincided with my move into AG, from which I get slightly hazier beer even after 1 week of 0c cold crash. I never suspected that the floculation properties of US-05 might be a factor. 

This has given me a bit to think about and I might give the 'Nott' another go with my AG beers. I  need to try the taste again, anyway.

Cheers

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15 hours ago, Hairy said:

Oh I’ve finally decided my future lies

Beyond the US-05

I'm stealing this joke first opportunity I get for one of my videos 😛

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I daresay most haze in AG beers isn't yeast related, especially if you bottle it. The yeast drops out pretty quickly in bottles and doesn't end up in the glass if you're careful when pouring it. 

US-05 might not drop out all that quickly in the fermenter but when I was bottling, they were clear at room temperature after 2-3 weeks. The haze I had in them was chill haze. 

These days with kegs it takes a bit longer to drop out fully even though I help it along with isinglass. Still, if I keg the beer and let it sit for 2-3 weeks it's usually pretty haze free, and only clears further during the time it's on tap, partly due to the yeast slowly dropping and partly because the beer is drawn from the bottom of the keg where there would be more yeast. As the level drops the beer becomes clearer.

I've also found that the yeast flocculation improves after about 3 generations for some reason.

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19 minutes ago, Worthog said:

Also my move to mostly US-05 has coincided with my move into AG, from which I get slightly hazier beer even after 1 week of 0c cold crash. I never suspected that the floculation properties of US-05 might be a factor. 

 

12 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

I daresay most haze in AG beers isn't yeast related, especially if you bottle it. The yeast drops out pretty quickly in bottles and doesn't end up in the glass if you're careful when pouring it. 

I didn't mention it above but am now reminded, one other thing that I noticed when I first used Nottingham was noticeably clearer beer when chilled.  In other words the level of chill-haze had reduced to quite an extent compared to kit yeast and US-05.  I can't offer an explanation but the difference was quite apparent and I can only assume that it is in some way related to the higher flocculation even though the yeast itself is not directly responsible for chill haze.

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It's possible that the yeast takes out some of the haze forming particles. I've read about Nottingham stripping hop influence; polyphenols come from hops primarily and are part of the chill haze equation. Maybe it's taking them down?

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19 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

It's possible that the yeast takes out some of the haze forming particles. I've read about Nottingham stripping hop influence; polyphenols come from hops primarily and are part of the chill haze equation. Maybe it's taking them down?

It could be that I guess.  That hop-stripping influence of Nottingham though - dunno, not so sure about that, but there's no way for us to measure these things really other than implementing the biggest and most unreliable brewing variable of all - human perception!  😁

 

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2 hours ago, King Ruddager said:

I'm stealing this joke first opportunity I get for one of my videos 😛

All good. All of my jokes are stolen anyway.

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Posted (edited)

My last 3 months have been all about US-05 slurry. So I'm drinking some, and conditioning the later ones. 

I'm getting the same sweet flavour from all batches; I haven't detected any differences even though I only go 3 generations of slurry before toss out.

I'm brewing low EBC all grain beers, 3-4kgs of base malts with 200g of specialty malts. The krausen is becoming high with US-05 slurries with 2nd and 3rd generation, krausen heights I never saw during extract brewing, but that might be the grain, it might be my aeration, or I might be over pitching.

I find US-05 more aggressive in slurry than in simple rehydrate, let alone surface pitching, which you wait over 24hrs for activity. Slurry, 8hrs to see activity.

Band-aid from US-05 is a fallacy if your water is good (no chloramines).  I've done 14 x US-05 batches of tap mash and rain/tank water additions prove it.

Cheers 😎

Edited by Worthog

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I did a heap of batches with it with chloraminated water and didn't get band-aid either. It's phenols reacting with the chlorine, but they could come from anywhere, already existing in the malt, the hops, it's not only yeast that produce them.

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Just got the reference and now I can't stop singing " Goodbye yellow brick road ah ah aha ahhh" or something like that!

Classic !!!

 

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Posted (edited)

I understand the frustrations of those that have had problems with certain strains of yeast. I had similar issues with BRY-97 & will not use it in my brewery anymore. Some of the comments about US-05 also ring true from my experiences with it, particularly with it not being a quick starter & the medium flocculation. That said, despite a few nervous brews where it seemed to be a little slow to get going, I haven't had any problems with it.

When comparing US-05 to Nottingham, I find Nottingham less friendly to both malt & hops than US-05. I agree that Nottingham has a naturally higher flocculation, but flocculation characteristics largely become a non-issue if you have a brew fridge that you can cold condition in as this process will drop out particulate from suspension given enough time at the right temperature. 😉

Don't get me wrong, I really like Nottingham & reckon it's a beast. I'd be more inclined to choose it over US-05 in heavier ABV &/or hopped beers where it's negative characters have less of an influence, & it's main positive character & aggressive nature provide added reliability for the primary ferment.

Just my 2 cents.

Lusty.

Edited by Beerlust

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