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Hey Ben,

There’s some real good podcasts on BeerSmith about meads and how to make it and reduce the ferment and “curing” time.

It’s really worth a listen for nutrient, oxygenation, and yeast timings.

 

I too wish to do a mead one day. I have friends who are in the honey business, that I’m trying to convince to put out a few hives on my little hobby farm. With a little cut off the top for a mead for us all.

But that’ll be a few years off yet.

Cheers

Captain

 

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Why not?

It will be 8 kgs of local honey' date=' 23 litres of water and some wine yeast.

I have some http://www.lallemandbrewing.com/product-details/servomyces-d50/ which looks like it may be suitable for nutrient.[/quote']

 

It is tailored to brewing but might make a good substitute for Fermaid O, which does not seem to be available on the retail level, at least not in my area. Fermaid O contains only organic sources of nitrogen. There is a movement amongst mead makers towards using only organic sources of nitrogen:

 

http://www.meadmaderight.com/info.html

 

Traditionally mead makers used Fermaid K, which contains both organic and inorganic sources of nitrogen (DAP). A lot of the tan coloured generic "yeast energizer" powders you see at LHBS are Fermaid K knock offs.

 

Michael Fairbrother of Moonlight Meadery still uses a traditional SNA schedule but in also adds fruit (melomels) for even more nutrition, and uses 71B yeast, fermented cool. He claims to be able to produce a melomel that is ready to drink in three months.

 

The local Meadery here in Fredericton uses 71B yeast and Fermaid O, following TOSNA 2.0.

 

Good luck with the mead Ben. Let us know how it goes.

 

Cheers,

 

Christina.

 

PS Since I can't buy either Fermaid O or Servomyces at my LHBS, I use boiled bread yeast instead, in my cider, country wines, and melomels, for my first and third additions, and generic "yeast energizer" for my second addition; seems to work fine....I have never made a straight mead, which would be more demanding. All of my stuff has fruit in it, which smooths out the bumps, in terms of nitrogen and potassium.

 

 

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You're welcome. wink

 

In case you are wondering, I met the owner of our local meadery at a beekeepers club meeting and quizzed him about his methods. Last winter I built a bunch of hives with the intention of starting to keep bees but, when the time got closer to get some bees, I got cold feet. We live right beside the woods and there are bears in the area. Bears love honey, and I did not want to attract them. I was hearing stories from fellow club members of bear raids. Some beekeepers put up electric fencing but bears are so big, and they have so much hair, they can plow through that and pull it over. It only works if they happen to put their nose on the wire. They said it wasn't a matter of "if" you will be raided, but "when." Anyway, I cancelled my order for bees and put the hives in the barn for storage. I hope to use them some day, if we move somewhere where there are no bears, the city maybe. lol

 

Two good things about winter: no bears and no bugs!

 

Cheers,

 

Christina.

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There is a famous saying that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, - except bears. Bears will kill you.

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That’s a fairly good reason to not have a hive.

I was thinking to myself, imagine that, can’t have bees because something might be attracted to them that could possibly attack you.

Then I was thinking I guess we have the same dangers here with animals/insects, it’s all reflective I guess. And what your use to.

 

Anyways, good luck with the brew Ben

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Anyways' date=' good luck with the brew Ben[/quote']

 

I won't be starting it just yet but have the honey put aside. It is passionfruit and avocado and apparently very nice. I want to make sure I am here to babysit it for the first few weeks.

 

 

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You're welcome. wink

 

In case you are wondering' date=' I met the owner of our local meadery at a beekeepers club meeting and quizzed him about his methods. Last winter I built a bunch of hives with the intention of starting to keep bees but, when the time got closer to get some bees, I got cold feet. We live right beside the woods and there are bears in the area. Bears love honey, and I did not want to attract them. I was hearing stories from fellow club members of bear raids. Some beekeepers put up electric fencing but bears are so big, and they have so much hair, they can plow through that and pull it over. It only works if they happen to put their nose on the wire. They said it wasn't a matter of "if" you will be raided, but "when." Anyway, I cancelled my order for bees and put the hives in the barn for storage. I hope to use them some day, if we move somewhere where there are no bears, the city maybe. [img']lol[/img]

 

Two good things about winter: no bears and no bugs!

 

Cheers,

 

Christina.

 

And Americans think Australia is full of dangerous animals.

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Alright, the 23 litre mead is going on shortly.

Wyeast Dry Mead....

 

 

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Bloody awesome Benny.

im trying to get a local honey supplier on board to make a mead together with Jarrah honey. 

Jarrah honey is amazing and dark!!! It’s unique in its flavour and not that easy to get. Well at least true single origin jarrah honey at a reasonable price.  $30-$40 a kilo is not unheard of for this type. 

Captain

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Good luck Ben. A few of the guys in my Home Brew Club make mead and often have nights when there are 5 or more different types. They are usually pretty big nights null

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1 hour ago, The Captain1525230099 said:

Bloody awesome Benny.

im trying to get a local honey supplier on board to make a mead together with Jarrah honey. 

Jarrah honey is amazing and dark!!! It’s unique in its flavour and not that easy to get. Well at least true single origin jarrah honey at a reasonable price.  $30-$40 a kilo is not unheard of for this type. 

Captain

wow at that price you'd want jarrah taste and aroma to come through , whatever it tastes like

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1 minute ago, ZedT said:

wow at that price you'd want jarrah taste and aroma to come through , whatever it tastes like

Yeah it’s pretty amazing honey. Very complex. Worth the money for toast hmmm not sure.

Got some local Banksia honey the other day. Effing so good. For $12 a kilo off the farmer who lives just down the road. 

Captain 

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I paid $9 a kilo for avocado passionfruit honey from a mate. Dark, smelly goodness.

 

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Signs of life this morning.... Happy times.

The JAOM is one month in.....

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Yep me too, still going though.

I have read some people like not putting nutrient in, see how we go/

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1.040 with a touch of the servomyces nutrient in.

The JAOM is crash chilling and I'll bottle that tomorrow. That one should be around 12%.

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