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thomas coopers bootmaker pale fermentation


stuv83

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Hi all. I'm new to brewing and have just kicked off my first batch with Thomas Cooper's bootmaker pale and was wondering how long I should let it ferment. Any help or tips would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Happy brewing. ūüćĽ

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Hi @stuv83 and welcome to the Forum.

Your best friend with fermenting a beer is a good hydrometer, it will measure the specific gravity of the beer and give you a good indication of when the fermentation process has finished. It is generally accepted that when a fermenting beer has achieved a stable gravity over 2 days then it can be bottled to begin its secondary fermentation and its conditioning period. If you do not have a hydrometer to test the SG then just be patient and allow 2 weeks in the fermenter before bottling it.

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Thanks, @kmar92.  I have the hydrometer that is included with the kit (I hope it's a good one). I took an SG reading after adding the yeast. I was planning on taking a second reading in 7 days and then again every day until I get two days of the same result. Does this sound like a good plan? 

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1 minute ago, stuv83 said:

Thanks, @kmar92.  I have the hydrometer that is included with the kit (I hope it's a good one). I took an SG reading after adding the yeast. I was planning on taking a second reading in 7 days and then again every day until I get two days of the same result. Does this sound like a good plan? 

Yep @stuv83 that sounds like a great plan. Just do not bottle too quickly, if you do you will have too much fermentable sugars left in the bottle, and that can cause explosive results with bottles being over pressurized.

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44 minutes ago, stuv83 said:

Hi all. I'm new to brewing and have just kicked off my first batch with Thomas Cooper's bootmaker pale and was wondering how long I should let it ferment. Any help or tips would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Happy brewing. ūüćĽ

good luck with your first brew. leave it alone for 10-14 days (ie no lifting the lid, stirring or worrying you've done anything wrong) would be my tip.

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21 minutes ago, Stickers said:

good luck with your first brew. leave it alone for 10-14 days (ie no lifting the lid, stirring or worrying you've done anything wrong) would be my tip.

Good advice here. Leave alone for that 10 or so days. If your wort temperature is at that 18 - 24 degrees the beer will look after you and be ready to bottle. Just dont overthink and fuss. The less tampering the better.

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2 hours ago, stuv83 said:

I have the hydrometer that is included with the kit (I hope it's a good one).

what starter kit do you have? the coopers one comes with a plastic hydrometer and it is the only piece of coopers equipment that I don't like. get a glass one from your local home brew shop.

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Hello @stuv83,

I am a new brewer too; onto Brew No. 8 now. I am very happy that I discovered the Coopers Community.  I would agree with all the advice above.  Today I'm about to bottle a brew of Coopers Australian Pale Ale. It is Day 11 of the brew, and has been at Final Gravity since Wed (Day 8).  

Best wishes from jennyss in Western NSW

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11 hours ago, stuv83 said:

Hi all. I'm new to brewing and have just kicked off my first batch with Thomas Cooper's bootmaker pale and was wondering how long I should let it ferment. Any help or tips would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Happy brewing. ūüćĽ

Hi Stu,

Welcome to the forum, I have done many Bootmaker Pale Ales, in fact there is one in the brew fridge @ 20c controlled with temp control. I followed the recipe exactly but added 50gm POR

(Pride of Ringwood Hops)

SG was 1.044. T put this together on Aug 12th & it will stay in the fridge until the 26th - exactly 14 days, it allows the yeast to clean up & settle in a nice solid cake on the bottom of the FV.

I don't bother bother to take any hydrometer readings in that time as I know from past experience it will finish around 1.012-1.014. I do check the final gravity though.

I don't recommend this to a new brewer but after a while it all pretty well just falls in to place.  I have bottled this brew many times & never had an issue.

This brew will be kegged but I can assure you it is one Cooper's finest Ales. There are always a few litres left over to bottle as the kegs are 19l. It is always a fine drink as is the AUS PALE ALE but with just a bit more body & more flavoursome.

Good luck with your first brew & I am sure you will enjoy it & even share a few photos with us.

Cheers

Phil

20220812_105812.thumb.jpg.a9d862e4335d900c9da22a240920782f.jpg

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15 hours ago, terminal2k said:

what starter kit do you have? the coopers one comes with a plastic hydrometer and it is the only piece of coopers equipment that I don't like. get a glass one from your local home brew shop.

I picked myself up a glass hydrometer made my keg kings from my local brew shop. Just trying to get the hang of using it. 

https://www.kegking.com.au/hydrometer.html

 

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6 minutes ago, stuv83 said:

I picked myself up a glass hydrometer made my keg kings from my local brew shop. Just trying to get the hang of using it. 

https://www.kegking.com.au/hydrometer.html

 

That'll do the trick.  I prefer the Coopers one though.  I have the same glass one too.  My problem is that the glass hydrometer measures in 0.002 increments and each tick mark is about 1mm apart.  The Coopers one measures in 0.001 and each tick mark is about 1mm apart.  The Coopers one is easier for me to read.

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1 hour ago, stuv83 said:

Just trying to get the hang of using it

I fuss and fiddle with my hydrometer every time I take a reading. The dratted thing seems to twirl around with it's back to me every time, or else it leans on the side of the tube and hides the reading in any remaining bubbles. I do have a jug and pour my sample in and out till the bubbles are all gone - get there eventually!

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14 minutes ago, jennyss said:

I fuss and fiddle with my hydrometer every time I take a reading. The dratted thing seems to twirl around with it's back to me every time, or else it leans on the side of the tube and hides the reading in any remaining bubbles. I do have a jug and pour my sample in and out till the bubbles are all gone - get there eventually!

Here Jenny watch this, it should help.

https://www.bing.com/ck/a?!&&p=dcc8bf36a1ce98aeJmltdHM9MTY2MDk3OTM3OCZpZ3VpZD1mZTRjNTFmMy0xYzM0LTRiNTAtOGJhMy1iZDE0OGY1OTFkOGUmaW5zaWQ9NTI4Mw&ptn=3&hsh=3&fclid=0d5497ef-2057-11ed-bf3e-7d1edb46306e&u=a1aHR0cHM6Ly9yZW5lZ2FkZWJyZXdpbmcuY29tL2hvdy10by1yZWFkLWEtaHlkcm9tZXRlci8&ntb=1

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10 minutes ago, Classic Brewing Co said:

 

How Do I Take A Hydrometer Reading?

While a beer hydrometer can be used to monitor the progression of fermentation, a lot of home brewers have difficulty getting an accurate reading. Below is an easy to follow guide on how to use your hydrometer.

Hydrometer readings are typically taken before pitching the yeast and after visible signs of fermentation have ceased. It is generally not recommended to take more samples than necessary because each time the fermenter is opened to draw out wort, you are introducing the risk for contamination.

Place the wort sample in a vessel big enough to allow the hydrometer to freely float without hitting the bottom or sides of the container. Use a test tube, or you can sometimes use the container the hydrometer came in. Once the liquid is in the container, place the hydrometer in the sample and give it a gentle spin. The hydrometer will eventually settle and you can take your reading. Sometimes the hydrometer will stick to the side of your vessel, so make sure it is floating freely before you take the reading!

General rule of thumb is that if you take two hydrometer readings 24-48hrs apart, and you get the same reading both times, fermentation is complete and you can now bottle/keg your beer.

Important Note: After you are finished, do not return your sample to the fermenter, as it could cause contamination. Instead, taste the sample to get an idea of what to expect from the final product, and discard it.

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