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New Labels & New Thomas Cooper Range

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I guess this explains the random emails and delivery I've received in the past week from Coopers, I now have two batches of the Brew A to put down and test. Thanks to the team at Coopers! smile

 

I was just waiting for the cooler Sydney weather to brew the first free sample, will probably get that going in the next week or so. Is it possible to tell from the sachet code whether the yeast is good or not? My original yeast code is 33515 B. If there's no way to tell I'll just toss the original yeast and use the one from the second batch since I do want to brew this as instructed to test it out before playing around with other yeasts.

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I guess this explains the random emails and delivery I've received in the past week from Coopers' date=' I now have two batches of the Brew A to put down and test. Thanks to the team at Coopers! [img']smile[/img]

 

I was just waiting for the cooler Sydney weather to brew the first free sample, will probably get that going in the next week or so. Is it possible to tell from the sachet code whether the yeast is good or not? My original yeast code is 33515 B. If there's no way to tell I'll just toss the original yeast and use the one from the second batch since I do want to brew this as instructed to test it out before playing around with other yeasts.

 

Hey CanuckDownUnder,

 

As you haven't brewed your first tester of the Thomas Coopers Brew A IPA, we are happy to post you out a replacement yeast.

 

Cheers!

 

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I've just put on my second Bootmaker Pale Ale compliments of Coopers, this one is being made with the new or possibly different single yeast packet.

 

Once again I followed the 23 Litre and 1.5 kg of Coopers LDM recipe so I can make a direct comparison.

 

My OG came up one point lower than the last but I did end up with a few malt golf balls that I just got tired of trying to beat out of it. Hopefully it turns out as nice as the first one which fortunately for me worked well and is almost all gone now.

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Hey CanuckDownUnder' date='

 

As you haven't brewed your first tester of the Thomas Coopers Brew A IPA, we are happy to post you out a replacement yeast.

 

Cheers![/quote']

 

Legendary stuff Coopers, thanks for going above and beyond! love

 

I put down the first batch of Brew A last Sunday, pitched right at 21C and it's currently going along nicely at ambient temps in the garage (~23C). A little warmer than I would normally brew at but wanted to try this batch in the recommended 21-27C range.

 

Just a couple of quick comments/observations. First, the Brew A can had a wonderful aroma, probably the best I can remember a Coopers can smelling, I hope this means good things for the final product.

 

Second, I'm not sure if it's unique to this batch or a feature of the new yeast in general, but I did notice it has been working at a more relaxed pace than what I'm used to with Coopers yeast. Took a couple of days to really get going and after five days there is a still a nice healthy krausen on there, more than I would have expected at this time. Not concerned in the least as I leave everything for at least three weeks in the fermenter, but maybe a little more patience is needed with the new strains of ale yeast provided.

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A little warmer than I would normally brew at but wanted to try this batch in the recommended 21-27C range.

Why? unsure

 

Because that's what it says in the instructions! biggrin That and I just lost patience waiting for ambient temperatures to drop down to the 18C range before brewing again. Now I can do the second batch at a lower temperature and compare the results.

 

I just checked my notes' date=' my first three homebrews were all pitched between 27-28C! I must have assumed the higher the temperature, the better it was for the yeast. [img']lol[/img]

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...I just checked my notes' date=' my first three homebrews were all pitched between 27-28C! I must have assumed the higher the temperature, the better it was for the yeast. [img']lol[/img]

It is for yeast propagation, but in the vast majority of cases, NOT for yeast fermentation. wink

 

Cheers & good brewing,

 

Lusty.

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I would guess those instructions are aimed at those who don't have reasonable temp control methods and that is a range they can probably maintain without too much effort; they appear on all the kits. It's well documented though that it's too warm for the best end result. cool

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Has anyone tried both the new 86 days pilsner and the European lager? If so what are the differences? Is it worth the extra money?

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I've got both on their way fwiw

 

Has anyone tried both the new 86 days pilsner and the European lager? If so what are the differences? Is it worth the extra money?

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Well, I've brewed and bottled my first Preacher's Hefe wheat kit. Fermented @ 19 degrees for a good 10 days while dropping gravity very slowly. The slowest brew I've done so far actually. Now, only 3 days in the bottle love I can never resist and is about the time I crack my first stubbie (Living in Darwin, most beers are carbed and clearing now)

 

Ok. It's carbed, check, almost clear, a tadd hazy. Aroma? HOEGAARDEN.. Which just happens to be my most favorite beer of all time but costs about $100 a carton. I'm very excited by this stage. Taste? Ahhh yes, Hoegaarden :) apart from the slightest tinge of young 'green' beer, you could absolutely swear you were enjoying a wit direct from one of Belgium's most revered breweries in history.

 

I don't know where Coopers got this yeast from but I could swear it's the same strain. As I've always said (and stuck by): Hoegaarden does NOT use coriander, nor orange peel, flavor is a direct result of the yeast.

 

I've found my house favorite and will now log onto the Coopers store to stock up.

 

Made with just 1x 1.5 can liquid wheat extract and 1x hefe kit to 23l, perfection

 

Thank you Coopers, an outstanding kit beer once again.

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Three days in the bottle and you're already over the moon about the taste - it can only get better over the next few weeks - I think I'll go and get myself a can and give it a try.

Cheers.

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Hey,

 

I guess I'm in way too late, but I'm very keen to try the new range.

 

My favourite cans from the coopers range:

 

Coopers Australian Pale Ale - this can is an excellent base to any beer recipe. I've found it very versatile to make either lager styles or well hopped pale ales.

 

I'm also a big fan of wheat beer, so I'm looking forward to trying the new recipe.

 

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I've just put on my second Bootmaker Pale Ale compliments of Coopers' date=' this one is being made with the new or possibly different single yeast packet.

 

Once again I followed the 23 Litre and 1.5 kg of Coopers LDM recipe so I can make a direct comparison.

 

My OG came up one point lower than the last but I did end up with a few malt golf balls that I just got tired of trying to beat out of it. Hopefully it turns out as nice as the first one which fortunately for me worked well and is almost all gone now.[/quote']

 

Just bottled this after 22 days in the FV @ 19°C, FG 1012

 

It seemed a little more gassy and frothy when bottling to what I'm used to, not sure if that's because the FV went arse up out my brew fridge a week ago or whether it's the new different yeast in this kit.

 

Another thing I noticed was when dumping the yeast cake out into my laundry trough was the color looked a little pinkish/orange compared to the usual yellow I'm used to seeing.

 

Anyhow it tasted great and I'm sure it will be all good to go in a couple of weeks for it's first tasting, stay tuned.

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I purchased two Coopers lager cans today. One was the European Lager and the other was the new 86 days pilsner.

 

When I got home I went to put the yeast in the fridge until I get around to making the kit and I noticed that the euro lager yeast was a lot fuller than normal. Upon weighting it I found it indeed was. It seems that taking into consideration the weight of the packet it's probably 11.5 grams. It still says 7 grams on the packet.

 

Has Coopers made a change recently?

 

Can I still assume this is the same pure lager yeast?

 

I'm under the impression both of these cans come with a lager strain that is likely 34/70 but unconfirmed by Coopers. Is that a fair assumption?

 

Thanks.

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Can I still assume this is the same pure lager yeast?

 

I'm under the impression both of these cans come with a lager strain that is likely 34/70 but unconfirmed by Coopers. Is that a fair assumption?

 

I am currently brewing a beer primarily with 34/70 but have a small secondary vessel which I pitched with harvested Coopers Lager yeast from the older Thomas Coopers' Pilsner can (P code on the pack). The yeasts behaved very differently and the flavour at this stage is remarkably different. It is possible that small temperature / pitch rate variance accounts for this but I'd put money on them being different strains.

 

If it means anything, I currently rate the Coopers' yeast better. Very clear taste, no esters or sulfuric aroma, and the malts of the very simple lager I'm brewing are allowed to shine.

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This is what I was talking about a couple of posts ago.

 

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Hey everyone.

 

So I haven't brewed up my Sparkling Ale kit yet but I was just wondering if it is OK with Coopers for me to perhaps make the Marilyn's Secret recipe with the supplies I was gifted or would you prefer for a review on the standard Sparkling Ale recipe?

 

Cheers + beers,

Mark

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After 2 attempts to make the Bootmaker Pale Ale, I have to say I was disappointed.

There was a definite taint or otherwise unpleasant flavour that although not strong, detracted from the flavour & aroma of the brew.

 

It is drinkable, however had I known to expect such results, I would have chosen to brew a different kit, whether Coopers or otherwise.

 

Ironically I currently have a WilliamsWarn American Pale Ale in my FV, made with 1.7kg LME with a Cascade steep; which is much the same style as the Bootmaker Pale Ale, & though it hasn't finished, initial testing of the gravity samples seem better than the equivalent with the Bootmaker.

 

Whether it was the included yeast, the recipe in the can, or some other factor I am yet to determine.

 

I may try this brew again, perhaps using US 05 yeast, & certainly more than 7g, however I really have come to the conclusion that the majority of Coopers brews are best made using a yeast starter or third party yeast if making with more than 500g additional malt.

 

Although I have had some FV infections in the past, I was meticulous with hygiene & temp control, brewing both batches at 21c, & only the first batch showed any sign of infection.

 

I will in future brew ales at 18c, but will no longer rely on 7g yeast packs alone to do the job when it comes to brews I make with LDM or LME, rather than Brew Enhancers, or LHBS equivalents.

I have no problem with the quality of Coopers yeast, however the quantity provided with each brew can really seems to struggle to produce a good beer if made with malt only adjuncts.

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I may try this brew again' date=' perhaps using US 05 yeast, & certainly more than 7g, however I really have come to the conclusion that the majority of Coopers brews are best made using a yeast starter or third party yeast if making with more than 500g additional malt.

 

Although I have had some FV infections in the past, I was meticulous with hygiene & temp control, brewing both batches at 21c, & only the first batch showed any sign of infection.

 

I will in future brew ales at 18c, but will no longer rely on 7g yeast packs alone to do the job when it comes to brews I make with LDM or LME, rather than Brew Enhancers, or LHBS equivalents.

I have no problem with the quality of Coopers yeast, however the quantity provided with each brew can really seems to struggle to produce a good beer if made with malt only adjuncts.[/quote']

 

Interesting. I have a Porter in the FV that is just LDM and the Coopers can (OG:1042), used the packet yeast attached (didn't weight it before use, will next time for reference), fermenting at 19C, with healthy kraussen by day 2. I have never had a problem with supplied Coopers yeast. I should add that I buy all my cans online so they are fresh.

 

I am shifting my extract based brewing to using only LDM or LME so this is something I will keep an eye on.

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I may try this brew again' date=' perhaps using US 05 yeast, & certainly more than 7g, however I really have come to the conclusion that the majority of Coopers brews are best made using a yeast starter or third party yeast if making with more than 500g additional malt.

 

Although I have had some FV infections in the past, I was meticulous with hygiene & temp control, brewing both batches at 21c, & only the first batch showed any sign of infection.

 

I will in future brew ales at 18c, but will no longer rely on 7g yeast packs alone to do the job when it comes to brews I make with LDM or LME, rather than Brew Enhancers, or LHBS equivalents.

I have no problem with the quality of Coopers yeast, however the quantity provided with each brew can really seems to struggle to produce a good beer if made with malt only adjuncts.[/quote']

 

Interesting. I have a Porter in the FV that is just LDM and the Coopers can (OG:1042), used the packet yeast attached (didn't weight it before use, will next time for reference), fermenting at 19C, with healthy kraussen by day 2. I have never had a problem with supplied Coopers yeast. I should add that I buy all my cans online so they are fresh.

 

I am shifting my extract based brewing to using only LDM or LME so this is something I will keep an eye on.

 

My 2 attempts with the Bootmaker were complimentary cans, the first as many others as well as me had trouble with the first batch.

They were sent from the Coopers warehouse, so would not have been any fresher than what you can buy online, as it was from the same source.

I only really posted about it on this thread, as it was a condition of being supplied with the complimentary brew cans that we give an unbiased report on it.

I've been happy enough with Coopers products until I used the Bootmaker can & yeast that came with it.

 

As I've said here, & on another thread, Coopers products are generally good quality, but the yeast provided isn't up to the task of fermenting out a can of extract as well as an additional malt over 500g, at least not on it's own if using the single 7g yeast pack that comes with the can.

 

I'm guessing that's why they recommend higher than the brewing temps most experienced brewers used, as well as their brew enhancers, faster cell count increases, & more simple sugar which are easier for the yeast to ferment.

 

That also explains why the more experienced brewers use 3rd party yeasts, or make starters, whether they're still using Coopers products or not.

I'd happily buy Coopers yeasts separately if available at the LHBS, it's the quantity not the quality that I see as the issue.

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I wonder whether it was just that particular yeast. Back in my kit days I used to use a kit plus 1.5kg LME (which I know is less than the equivalent DME), and just dry pitched the yeast into it and had no problems with it fermenting out. I can't remember what temp they were fermented at but it would have been high teens/low 20s as by that stage I had learned about temp control. The yeast in question was usually the hybrid ale/lager blend.

 

Of course, nowadays I make starters and I would do so even if I did brew a kit again because I do agree that once you go over that 1kg extra dry fermentables, 7g isn't really enough. I mean, it'll still work 99 times out of 100, but you may end up with some less than desirable flavours. For an OG of 1.042 I think it would be fine, it's when you get up over say 1.046/7 and higher that it becomes a bit of an issue.

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Hey everyone.

 

So I finally got around to brewing up the kit given to me so generously by Coopers and I currently have it on tap at home. I souped it up a little just to suit my own tastes. Here is the recipe:

 

1.7kg Coopers Innkeeper’s Daughter Sparkling Ale

1kg Light Dry Malt

30g of hops steeped in boiling water: (10g each of Ahtanum, Experimental Grapefruit & Simcoe)

30g Vic Secret (dry hopped for 4 days)

US05

20 litre brew

 

OG: 1043 / FG: 1011

ABV: 4.3%

 

This is a very nice drop. If I had of made something like this back when I first started brewing I would have been absolutely chuffed. And the new Sparkling Ale can doesn’t have any of the overt sweetness I found in the old TC range can. Thanks again to Coopers for letting me do a road test. If I need to get a quick brew on in the future I’ll definitely have a go at something else in the new range – the Amber Ale looks like a good one.

 

Cheers + beers,

Mark

 

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Either I'll never brew the TC range again, or if I do I'll use a 3rd party yeast, but even then not happy with the results of 2 attempts at the Bootmaker & 1 with the IPA.

Nothing wrong with the IS range, but I found the TC range very disappointing.

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I've done a few (5) Inn Keepers since the new range has come out and found them to be as good if not better than the old TC range.

 

I have used both the pack yeast and captured yeast and a combination of both of these and all turned out great and all my mates drank em no complaints

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