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Saunders Malt Extract


Davidt15

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G'day David

 

I've brewed with it in the past when I haven't been able to get to a home brew shop. Its worked fine for me. Never used more than a 1kg of it in a recipe though. I'd say go for it. You never know, given the amount of malt extract coopers make they could be the ones making it.

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  • 1 year later...
Not that I've used it' date=' but I can't see why you can't use it. "Extract of Malted Barley" ... isn't that exactly what any malt extract is anyway? What difference does it make if it's not made by a brewing company? As far as I can see it's still the same thing. [/quote']

 

Not all barley is the same quality. Brewing grade is higher than food grade, which is higher than feed grade.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Not that I've used it' date=' but I can't see why you can't use it. "Extract of Malted Barley" ... isn't that exactly what any malt extract is anyway? What difference does it make if it's not made by a brewing company? As far as I can see it's still the same thing. [/quote']

 

Not all barley is the same quality. Brewing grade is higher than food grade, which is higher than feed grade.

 

 

So what exactly is the 'difference' in the grades? Are we talking difference in the grade of barley used? As in Morgan Brewing Company in QLD is using left over barley or something to make this with? Or they use cheap barley to make it with? What is the difference between the qualities? If they are different? I cant see why brewing malt would be of higher grade than food malt. Brewing malt is used as a fermentable sugar and not actually being consumed by the end user as the malt it is. Where as food grade is an additive into readily eaten food....so it makes no sense that 'food' grade malt is of lesser quality that brewing! Has anyone got some facts on this? Some references or something to prove either way...since it seems like brewing companies are the ones who specifically supply large amounts of liquid malts for brewing commercial, home and also to the food industry. It seems a bit abnormal they would 'change' the grade at which they produce malt just to save a few dollars on production if that is even possible since making liquid malt is really a simple stage process that conceivably cant be changed just to accomodate different grades...maybe its just the water to malt content that would make sense at to why there are different 'grades' of liquid malt...but really I cant see much else(Im talking about besides from the obvious cooking the barley longer to get richer colours and flavours)?? Or is the food grade barley cooked for shorter periods of time! Ok im off to do some research!!

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I know beer barley is specially selected so they are all uniform in size so the maltsters can get even germination. There has been shortages at times due to weather conditions. Maybe they arent so fussy with the food grade??? but I'm just guessing, get into Stoo!

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So what exactly is the 'difference' in the grades? Are we talking difference in the grade of barley used?

 

Disclaimer:- I am not a maltster or brewing expert.

 

From a grain trading point of view, barley is either feed barley or malting barley. One of the main criteria for malting barley is the protein level. Malting barley is generally between 9% & 12%. There are of coarse other criteria such as energy content and falling numbers.

 

Others might have further knowledge regarding malting techniques etc.

 

Just enjoying a wee pint of my Coopers EB!!!

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From a grain trading point of view, barley is either feed barley or malting barley. One of the main criteria for malting barley is the protein level. Malting barley is generally between 9% & 12%. There are of coarse other criteria such as energy content and falling numbers.

 

Mainly it seems the size? And I'm pretty sure that brewing companies have a certain size of grain that fit in their tuns? And that is the difference in the barley grade between feed and food...smaller grain less proteins and in turn less sugar...I just posted a huge thing on it mate but thanks for that in terms of the barley side [happy] knowledge is power!! Power to make better beer [bandit]

 

So that is REALLY good to know...if I ever buy grain from someone like you [ninja] We are having a debate on wether the tin of saunders malt in the supermarket is the same exact thing as brewing malt..since it is made by a brewing company in QLD and it seems like there is only one grade of liquid malt for human consumption...and that is brewing malt, it just turns out that its good to bake with as well...and I think there is a big debate going on with archeologists atm as to wether the first ever barley that was domesticated, was domesticated to brew beer with...It seems like food and brewing malt must be the same thing by all intense and purposes there is no point in making it differently! But thanks again mate always good to know the grain side of things [happy]

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Mainly it seems the size? And I'm pretty sure that brewing companies have a certain size of grain that fit in their tuns? And that is the difference in the barley grade between feed and food...smaller grain less proteins and in turn less sugar... [happy]

 

There is in fact a standard for size - Malt1 has a retention of 70% on a 2.50mm screen. Malt2 has a retention of 62%. Smaller grain doesn't necessarily mean lower protein, usually a stressed plant producing smaller grain will have high protein but might fail a malt test on other criteria.

 

Cheers [biggrin]

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There is in fact a standard for size - Malt1 has a retention of 70% on a 2.50mm screen. Malt2 has a retention of 62%. Smaller grain doesn't necessarily mean lower protein, usually a stressed plant producing smaller grain will have high protein but might fail a malt test on other criteria.

 

Wow you know your grain, sorry I should know better as stressed plant would produce more protein but less sugar as it is stressed and putting more energy into survival, having a tendency to grow weak flowers... got ya so I would assume(being an ass) that brewing grade grain would be Malt1 and Food grain possibly Malt2....hmmm this rapidly getting confusing now..but I love it!![alien]

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Wow you know your grain, sorry I should know better as stressed plant would produce more protein but less sugar as it is stressed and putting more energy into survival, having a tendency to grow weak flowers... got ya so I would assume(being an ass) that brewing grade grain would be Malt1 and Food grain possibly Malt2....hmmm this rapidly getting confusing now..but I love it!![alien]

 

I would like to think that I have learnt something over the years, I have only been in the grain businees for 25 years so am picking it up slowly!!![innocent]

 

I think you might find that malsters use what ever is available at the time. If Malt1 is not available in a particular season you may find that they utilise Malt2, or maybe even Malt3!!! Mind you QLD (where I live) is not known as a barley area doesn't always have as good of a supply as say South Australia.

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I would like to think that I have learnt something over the years, I have only been in the grain businees for 25 years so am picking it up slowly

 

At least you have your speciality...I'm a horticultralist so I do get the technicals..SA grain I think is basically owned by some over seas company. The farmers harvest and sit at the silos for a week before they decide to open. This is all good to know...however I'm just about to finish one of the EB saunders...and the woman tried to steal it from me it tastes so good, carbing up like an english should and has some wild flavour and aroma due to the brigalow finishing hops...I have an IPA in the mix atm and it should come out similar but that uses lhbs malt so I will have no problems in telling the difference. I must say tho this is WELL drinkable and probably the best I have made so far [alien] but my taste buds are different to anyone elses!

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  • 9 years later...

In the end no just don't use Sanders you WILL get a funny buiscity taste, its not designed for beer . Ive tried it with various ale yeasts, kveiks etc , and everytime i made 2 FV's at once , one with saunders one without, the non Saunders batch tasted better in every single possible configuration and circumstance , every single time. 

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