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#20

Your favorite Thomas Coopers Irish Stout Recipe?

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Hi,

 

My LHBS had a sale on the Thomas Coopers Irish Stout kit. I bought 3.

 

There are 3 recipes in the recipes section here where this kit is used.

 

For the simplicity I might brew one Irish Stout recipe. I have done it once before, over 2 years ago and from what I remember it was quite nice for the little effort necessary. I might try the English Stout recipe. I think I will pass on The ChocLiqueur Stout.

 

Do you guys have any other suggestions and recipes where these kits could be the base for a nice one?

 

I don't mind steeping some grains by the way.

 

Cheers,

#20

 

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Hi #20. It doesn't look like anyone is answering.

 

I made the Choc Liqueur recipe once, using the OS stout kit as the base, and just 200gm of chocolate malt, and I think you are right to give it a pass. The artificial chocolate essence was awful. But you could use the recipe for some ideas. I would suggest the following for consideration, but bear in mind that I have not made it:

 

1.7kg Coopers Irish Stout

1.5kg Amber LME

200gm Pale (200L) Chocolate malt

1 pkg S-04 yeast, rehydrated, fermented at 20C

23L

 

Based on my experience with the recipe, I am suggesting you use pale chocolate malt, and reduce the amount to 200gm. When I made it I used 200gm of British chocolate malt (a very dark roast) and it was too much. If you can't get pale chocolate malt, use software to match the colour. If you are not planning to rehydrate the S-04, I would throw the kit yeast in too.

 

Cheers #20, and good luck! -Christina.

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Thanks for the advice, Christina. Your suggestions are food for thought. And yeah, not gonna try the Choc Liqueur one.

 

CaffeinatedSentryGnome: Yeah, it sounds nice. I might try that one.

 

In general - there are a lot more recipes with the OS Stout kit than the Irish Stout. How much of a difference is there between those kits? Can I just use the Irish Stout in a recipe that calls for an OS Stout kit? Or is there too much of a difference? Could I make up for that difference by adding some specialty grains maybe? What is the difference between those two anyway?

 

 

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I think the Irish Stout is meant to be more like the dry Guinness that you find on tap everywhere, whereas the OS Stout is more like a foreign extra in flavour profile, i.e. big, rich and roasty flavours. I'm sure they could be interchanged in a recipe but the outcome might be different to what was intended.

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I think the Irish Stout is meant to be more like the dry Guinness that you find on tap everywhere' date=' whereas the OS Stout is more like a foreign extra in flavour profile, i.e. big, rich and roasty flavours. I'm sure they could be interchanged in a recipe but the outcome might be different to what was intended.[/quote']

 

Yeah. That is what I understand from what I have read as well.

 

I have a couple of recipes that I can make now anyway.

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I think the Irish Stout is meant to be more like the dry Guinness that you find on tap everywhere' date=' whereas the OS Stout is more like a foreign extra in flavour profile, i.e. big, rich and roasty flavours. I'm sure they could be interchanged in a recipe but the outcome might be different to what was intended.[/quote']

 

Yes, substituting the Irish Stout kit for the OS kit is probably okay. But getting back to the Choc Licqueur recipe, I would not recommend doing it the other way around: substituting the OS kit for the Irish Stout kit. Aside from the whole artificial chocolate essence thing, this recipe is too wide open. If you used the Irish Stout kit and 300gm of Joe White Chocolate you might end up with something tasty, but using the OS Stout kit and 300gm Roasted/Black Malt, which is another way to read the recipe, it would be very different. Joe White Chocolate is only 500-800EBC; Thomas Fawcett Black Malt, for example, is 1300-1600EBC. I don't think Coopers is doing their customers any favours by not specifying the colour of the roasted malts in their recipes. I still get upset when I remember how awful that recipe tasted.

 

Cheers! -Christina.

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