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King Ruddager

Flavour hops

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Sounds pretty much exactly like what I do, John. Some differences are that I don't always do a FWH addition, and even when I do I will usually "top up" the bitterness with a small Magnum addition at 60 minutes if needed. The late additions are basically the same (10 mins rather than 5 usually though) for APAs although I do vary them by style as well.

For instance in my ESBs I don't do a flameout addition or a dry hop, mainly because of the commercial ones I've tried I prefer the more malt driven examples. Porters/stouts don't have any late additions at all. The latest addition is at 20 mins in my red ale. It's all trial and error based on my preferences for each type of beer I brew.

 

Of course with the pilsners I've loosely followed the Urquell hop schedule of FWH, 80 mins and 25 mins, although have moved the 25 mins addition to 15 mins to better suit my system. Very close to the original in flavour.

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...One of them was a Citra pale ale (citra @20' date=' 7 and dh). Absolutely delicious when young, but the aroma seems to fade away pretty fast on it after some weeks in the bottle. Anyone else having this experience? It may be the characteristics of the Citra this...

 

I figured the 20,7,dh would be a nice hop schedule based on the information in this chart (max flavor at 20, max aroma at 7). But it's open for tweaking....[/quote']

That type of hop schedule is what would be classified as a very standard schedule that will produce very generic outcomes across many styles of beer. Modern hopping techniques have evolved past that, & those that are commanding the most attention in the commercial market with their craft beers these days are not following traditional schedules or methods.

 

I've been compiling some info to try & explain some deeper areas about hop attributes that might help some brewers with hop selection, & why to use some hops over others in some situations. I have the day off work tomorrow, so will post something then as right now my head hurts & I CBB atm. pinched

 

Cheers,

 

Lusty.

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That type of hop schedule is what would be classified as a very standard schedule that will produce very generic outcomes across many styles of beer. Modern hopping techniques have evolved past that' date=' & those that are commanding the most attention in the commercial market with their craft beers these days are not following traditional schedules or methods.

 

I've been compiling some info to try & explain some deeper areas about hop attributes that might help some brewers with hop selection, & why to use some hops over others in some situations. I have the day off work tomorrow, so will post something then as right now my head hurts & I CBB. [img']pinched[/img]

 

Cheers,

 

Lusty.[/size]

 

Thanks, Lusty. Yeah. I guess you are right about that. It's a way too simplistic approx to just use that chart, I guess. But I just wanted to have kind of a reference point to build my recipes around. And I figured this was a nice starting point.

 

First wort hopping is something I have never tried. Is this any good when doing extract with smaller boils (5-7 litres) and then topping up with water? How do you calculate bitterness from first wort hopping in Ian's Spreadsheet?

 

Looking forward to you post about hops, when you get the time for it Lusty :-)

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Hi #20.

Thanks' date=' Lusty. Yeah. I guess you are right about that. It's a way too simplistic approx to just use that chart, I guess. But I just wanted to have kind of a reference point to build my recipes around. And I figured this was a nice starting point.[/quote']

It is a good reference point to build your recipes around. smile I used this very same chart when I began experimenting with hopping my own beers.

First wort hopping is something I have never tried. Is this any good when doing extract with smaller boils (5-7 litres) and then topping up with water? How do you calculate bitterness from first wort hopping in Ian's Spreadsheet?

I'm an extract/partial brewer & I use the technique. coolhappy

 

Some sources of info here on the forum...

 

First Wort Hopping

First Wort Hopping (FWH)

FWH-ing

 

As for calculating the IBU number in the spreadsheet' date=' Kelsey & I bounced a few numbers back & forth a little while back to help me devise an accurate way to add it into the spreadsheet, but do you think I can remember the exact formula or what thread we discussed it in? [img']pinched[/img]

 

From memory, it involved something like adding 10% to the weight of the hop being used & using 70 or 80mins for the boil time. Hopefully Kelsey can remember the conversation &/or thread. unsure

 

Cheers,

 

Lusty.

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I think it was simply adding 10% to the weight of the hops; the boil time stayed the same. Just confirming that in Beersmith now in one of my recipes that features FWH.

 

20g Cascade @ FWH (75 minutes) gives 13.3 IBUs

22g Cascade boiled 75 mins gives the same 13.3 IBUs.

 

There you have it, simplez!biggrin

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OK - I have a question about dry hopping. Looks like most of you blokes dry hop on secondary fermentation stage? Am I correct?

Do you leave the hop bag in the brew until bottling or do you leave the bag in for a specified time only?

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OK - I have a question about dry hopping. Looks like most of you blokes dry hop on secondary fermentation stage? Am I correct?

Do you leave the hop bag in the brew until bottling or do you leave the bag in for a specified time only?

Most people dry hop during primary fermentation or when it has just finished. I leave the bag in until bottling.

 

Note: secondary fermentation occurs in the bottle.

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Thanks Hairy - I was classing secondary fermentation as the stage where you raise the temperature from 19 to 21 on the primary slow down. That is where I was intending to dry hop.

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Crap, I forgot to dry hop my pale ale yesterday when taking the first FG sample. lol Oh well, it'll just have to go in tomorrow when I will likely drop the temp down.. not like the temp will come down super fast anyway.

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Kelsey - You could do the 14 degree hold like we read about on BrewDog ie: if you have the spare time in your brew fridge that is.

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I did think about that actually, but I am in a bit of a situation at the moment of trying to get brews into kegs as quickly as possible without sacrificing quality... but when I can relax a bit more with it I'll definitely give that a go.

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What sort of a dry hop regimen were you planning for the pale ale mate? I'm just after some ideas for this bootmaker. I can't help but experiment a bit if I can. I have readily accessible EKG, Amarillo and cascade.

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I was just gonna chuck in what I have left of my Cascade to use it up, not sure how much is in the bag, probably somewhere between 20 and 40g. It was meant to go in yesterday in order to spend a couple of days at the 21C or whatever it's sitting at, but the memory didn't work very well. lol

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Lots of interesting stuff here, guys happy. Thanks for the response on my questions about FWH-ing.

 

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