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AbbeyBeer

Coopers Australian pale ale - not clearing in the fermenter - Help!

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I brewed my first batch of coopers lager with the kit I purchased. I made a mistake with the temperature pitching the yeast in at 28deg. My first brew was unsuccessful due to an infection. I tried again but with coopers Australian pale ale. Instead if using coopers No.2 dextrose, I purchase a kit with mix dry malt, dextrose and a hops bag. Instead of using cooper yeast I decided to use Safale S-04 yeast. I made 100% sure to get the temperature right this time. I pitch in the yeast at 20deg and kept the temperature between 15deg-20deg for 5 days already. With the Lager there was a strong alcohol smell for the first 4 days and cleared pretty quickly. With pale ale there is no strong smell and the bubbles seems to not be clearing. What’s going on? Is this possibly the second fail

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It all sounds OK at the moment. It may still be fermenting so give it some time and it will clear a little.

 

By 'bubbles' do you mean the foam on top (this is called the krausen)? If so, sometimes it takes a little while for this to drop away. Nothing to worry about.

 

Have you taken a gravity reading?

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15degrees is a little low to be fermenting that yeast at. My Stout with S-04 is still bubbling from the bottom and it's on it's 5th day. let the temp come up to around 20c and give it another week at least.

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I should expect that it would still be cloudy after only 5 days. The fermentation is unlikely to even be finished yet, let alone the yeast dropping out. You'll never get brilliantly clear beer in the fermenter anyway unless you leave it at 0C for 4 months or something. Either way, cloudiness is not something to be worried about - all it is is yeast in suspension.

 

Agreed get the temp up to at least 20C with that yeast, otherwise it tends to have a habit of slacking off and not finishing the fermentation off.

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Someone around here has a picture demonstrating how a fermenting pale eventually clears up. They had two fermenters side-by-side with the same recipe brewed just a couple of days apart. One looked clear and one looked like mashed bananas!

 

As Otto said, it will happen. RDWHAHB

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Thanks for the replies. I will keep the temp about 20deg and thanks for the correction, yes I meant to say krausen. I will take a gravity reading at 6 & 7 to see if it is stabilizing. Is Safale S-04 a good yeast to use?

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Thanks for the replies. I will keep the temp about 20deg and thanks for the correction' date=' yes I meant to say krausen. I will take a gravity reading at 6 & 7 to see if it is stabilizing. Is Safale S-04 a good yeast to use? [/quote']

 

G'day AbbeyBeer, We brewers are a funny lot we have our favorites and things we don't like so much. wink

 

That being said, I have a Pale Ale I used S-04 in and I was very happy with th result, as you have been advised watch your temps. wink

 

On the yeast pack it tells you the temp range, 20 C worked great form me and this beer. smile

 

Cheers.

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Is Safale S-04 a good yeast to use?

 

Well ... there's those of us around here who kinda avoid using it (or BRY-97 for the same reason) because, as Otto said, it has a habit of slacking off. That means that fermentation might stall or not complete, and if you're bottling that can be a problem. It usually happens if the temperature drops much below 20, so you'll have to watch yours by the sounds of it.

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I did a Brew A according to the recpie in the Coopers catalog which uses two plae ale cans and it also didnt look as clear as other batches have at similar times but once in the bottle it cleared up magnificently and has been one of my favorites so far. It'll be fine!

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I brewed my first batch of coopers lager with the kit I purchased. I made a mistake with the temperature pitching the yeast in at 28deg. My first brew was unsuccessful due to an infection. I tried again but with coopers Australian pale ale. Instead if using coopers No.2 dextrose' date=' I purchase a kit with mix dry malt, dextrose and a hops bag. Instead of using cooper yeast I decided to use Safale S-04 yeast. I made 100% sure to get the temperature right this time. I pitch in the yeast at 20deg and kept the temperature between 15deg-20deg for 5 days already. With the Lager there was a strong alcohol smell for the first 4 days and cleared pretty quickly. With pale ale there is no strong smell and the bubbles seems to not be clearing. What’s going on? Is this possibly the second fail[/quote']

 

I had a couple of successive infection/brew fails late last year.

Infection can build up over time, or can come seemingly out of nowhere.

What I learned from the experience is that the FV tap is a real Achilles heel, & needs to be washed, soaked & sanitized separately & thoroughly.

It's also really important to thoroughly clean & sanitize well between batches, & you can't overdo it between batches if you've had an infection.

 

Even leaving the FV dry a few days or longer between batches can reduce the likelihood of infection.

Sanitation is one of the biggest causes of brew fails, as is temp control.

Get those two under control & the majority of your brews should be fine.

 

Your current brew may turn out fine, or it may not, & if it doesn't it will be hard to determine if your previous infection is the cause, the yeast failed, or it was a combination of both.

Don't give in to the temptation to give it a look & smell between readings.

You'll know it's dud when you go to bottle it, as it will smell bitter/sour, & taste terrible.

 

Most of us usually leave our brews in the FV for at least 2 weeks, one week for fermentation, a further week for settling.

If it hasn't settled after 2 weeks, chances are there's something wrong, & the best thing to do then is check if it's drinkable, & bottle it if it is, tip it if it isn't thoroughly clean & sanitize, then move on.

 

I agonized for weeks over my failed brews, but in the end the only thing to do is to be more thorough & consistent in future, not make the same mistakes again, & not let it stop you from brewing in the future.

Too many brewers give up after a dud batch, but at least a few along the way are part of the learning curve.

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Thanks to everyone that posted on this topic. My beer turned out to be perfectly fine. Can't be more pleased. So far everyone that tasted my beer liked it. So far good.

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