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Otto Von Blotto

Wyeast 1275 & 1968

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Hey everyone,

 

I just got back from Craftbrewer, where I decided to pick up these two liquid yeasts after using exclusively dry yeast for the almost two years I've been brewing (again). Didn't realise the packs were so big.[lol]

 

Anyway, who else has had experience with these? Not exactly sure what to expect from them behaviour and flavour wise but looking forward to trying them out on a couple of brews soon. [happy]

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I have used 1275 in a Hobgoblin clone a month or so ago. Made a starter, fermented at 18c. Ended up at 1.008, attenuated more than I expected. Could have been the poor temp control on my mash though.

 

Got another starter on the stirplate to repeat the same beer on Sunday, but should turn out closer to 1.012 with some improved practices/brewery upgrades.

 

It seemed rather clean at that temp, and Philbo told me he ferments with it around 20c to get some flavour from it, which is what I will do this time.

 

I am just using 1275 and 1272 for now, see what I can get out of them.

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Cool as. I'll probably go more around the 18C mark as I do like the cleaner flavours associated with lower ferment temps. I'll generally ferment at the lower end of the scale. But I guess it depends on the beer too. Might have to brew up another English ale to use one of them on soon now!

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I've got both of those yeasts at the moment Kelsey.

 

1275, as K said, attenuates like a monster for an English yeast. I got around the 80%AA mark on my last ESB. It's great for beers you want to use heaps of crystal in, but still want to get them pretty low so you don't need a knife and fork to enjoy them. I'm using one on an ale for Dad at the moment and I had to attach a blow off at ambient temps. [pinched]

 

I'm going with 1968 on my next ESB, because the 1275 has just been getting them too damn dry! Great for big stouts and EIPAs, but I sometimes want my ESB a bit thicker.

 

K made another point which probably holds true for me as well, and that's mash temps. I lose A LOT of temp during my mash, and that may be contributing to the attenuation. Hopefully my brand new kick ass mash tun will fix that. [happy] Giving it a test this weekend hopefully!

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Cool as. I'll probably go more around the 18C mark as I do like the cleaner flavours associated with lower ferment temps.

 

If you want a neutral ('clean') flavour profile, like that achieved with low ferment temps, you may be better off with the US strains. The best part about the pommy yeasts is the character they give the finished beer through fruity/nutty esters from higher temps. It's not that the flavour isn't 'clean' exactly, it's just that it gives you some flavour from the yeast.

 

All my opinion entirely, as always. [lol]

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K made another point which probably holds true for me as well, and that's mash temps. I lose A LOT of temp during my mash, and that may be contributing to the attenuation. Hopefully my brand new kick ass mash tun will fix that. [happy] Giving it a test this weekend hopefully!

 

Yep this is why I am giving my basic HERMS setup a run on Sunday. I just could not be bothered farting around with mash temp and guessing. Going to recirculate the mash at 69c and will let you know how the 1275 attenuates then. If it still goes under 1.010 well I will have to try the 1968.

 

 

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Thanks for the replies guys. [cool]

 

I have used dry English yeasts before, currently drinking one I used Nottingham in and also made a very nice English dark-ish ale with S-04, so I'm not averse to them, which is why I decided to grab a couple of different liquid types to try out. I don't mind if they throw a little flavour, I'd just rather it resemble a malt and hops drink than a bloody fruit salad. [lol]

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Thanks for the replies guys. [cool]

 

I have used dry English yeasts before, currently drinking one I used Nottingham in and also made a very nice English dark-ish ale with S-04, so I'm not averse to them, which is why I decided to grab a couple of different liquid types to try out. I don't mind if they throw a little flavour, I'd just rather it resemble a malt and hops drink than a bloody fruit salad. [lol]

 

My 1275 starter has a very light/airy bread aroma. Have to look for it though so it is subtle.

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I've had those types of aromas with yeast starters as well. Anyway I'll give one a go on my next English style ale whenever I get around to making one. Might try the 1275 first up and see how it goes. [cool]

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Just some feedback for you Kelsey re the 1968. Wow, this stuff flocs like there's no tomorrow.

 

It had fermented out when I got up this morning in the first step of the starter I was growing it in. Nothing weird about that, I thought, but I'd better CC it for a little while to be sure before I decant the first step.

 

Well, I've been off work the last two days with a pretty crook guts (not related to home brew BTW [rightful]) so I got really bored and decided to see what I could decant so I could get the next step fermenting. Well, bugger me, I was able to tip the entire first step beer off the top and tip it dry. The yeast didn't budge. Only other like it I've seen is 1272.

 

If this makes a nice beer, I'll be changing to it for most of my pommy ales. Although if I try a big stout or porter I'll probably go back to 1275 for its wicked-cool attenuation.

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Hey Phil, cheers for that feedback about the 1968. I haven't used mine yet but it will be going into the next batch of English pale that I do.

 

I've currently got an English pale in the FV with 1275, man that thing took off. I've got about 6 or 7 inches headspace in the FV, and it took up all that and would have been more if not for the lid, with krausen, about 30 hours after pitching. It died down a day or so later and should be finished in the next day or two. I'll take readings next Monday and Tuesday and see where it's at. [happy]

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K made another point which probably holds true for me as well, and that's mash temps. I lose A LOT of temp during my mash, and that may be contributing to the attenuation. Hopefully my brand new kick ass mash tun will fix that. [happy] Giving it a test this weekend hopefully!

I've recently solved my mash temp inconsistencies adding a propeer thermometer to my MT. This thing has made a brewer's (mad scientists[bandit] ) life a lot easier. Now all I do is let the liquor from the HLT to the MT from tap to tap as usual (approx.2L/Kg ratio), then do a quick temp check to see where the temp is at before I "dough in" just make sure things aren't too haywire. After I've doughed in I check temp again. If the temp is low (which it always is for me) it's just a matter of opening the taps again to let a little more Hot liquor while watching the thermometer. As soon as the temp reaches the magic mark I I shut down the tap. This may seem completely normal to you 3V blokes, but the difference is I no longer have to lift the lid, pull out the old submerged thermo, read it. All the while losing precious heat. Lifting the lid is about the worst thing you could do for maintaining a steady temps. With the new thermo I only lift the lid once half way through the mash to give it a stir. At this time I just let a little more hot liquor in to maintain temp.[cool]

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