Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
AlexM15

Reducing temperature in fermenter with heat belt on?

Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

 

Its getting very cold here over night (1-2 degrees) at the moment so i have to have a heat belt on my brew. It seems to hold around 26-28 degrees.

 

Just wondering what people do if they need to ferment at a lower temp (like lagers). Can i put something in between the belt and the fermenter to stop so much heat getting through?

 

I think if i dont run the belt it will get too cold...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alex, I just put mine on a plug in timer and keep and eye on it. At the moment I have my belt heat for about 5 hours a night (8-10 degrees here at night ). Also my fermenting vessel is in a fridge that is off but used like an esky to insulate.

 

You will get some other responses to tell you to splash out on a fridge with a STC controller, this is probably the best way to control temps and your brews will be better for it, if you have spare space and $$$.[pinched] [lol]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, if you are using the Coopers Kit yeast 26-28 is at the upper end, I brew mine with this yeast 18-20.

 

The lager kits don't all use lager yeast either, Orig series lager uses ale yeast, I think euro lager is either lager or have heard people say its a mix, on the instructions with the can there is a special section for euro lager.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Mark, I've been waiting for one of your posts to pop up again so I could congratulate you on your signature line. [cool]

 

Alex, if you don't have space for a fridge, definitely get one of those cheap timers for your heat belt so you can space out the bursts of heat you're giving your brew. I ferment a few degrees higher than most of the lads on this forum, but 26-28 is too high bud.

 

What I used to do in the times before my fridge was set one of those little wheel timers to come on for one hour, then off for two etc, and adjust the intervals according to the time of the year.

 

But yeah mate, get a fridge. [biggrin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a fridge [rightful]

 

Sorry, just fulfilling the prophecy from an earlier post [innocent]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Mark, I've been waiting for one of your posts to pop up again so I could congratulate you on your signature line. Cool

 

 

Thanks Phil, if you google beer quotes there are hundreds, that one took my fancy and seemed appropriate[biggrin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi guys,

 

Its getting very cold here over night (1-2 degrees) at the moment so i have to have a heat belt on my brew. It seems to hold around 26-28 degrees.

 

Just wondering what people do if they need to ferment at a lower temp (like lagers). Can i put something in between the belt and the fermenter to stop so much heat getting through?

 

I think if i dont run the belt it will get too cold...

Hey Alex

 

Order yourself one of these, fix the probe to the side of the FV with the elastic from a pair of undies and plug your heat belt into the unit.

 

While your waiting for it to arrive slide your heat belt up higher on the FV. Your wort is mainly water (not a good conductor of heat) and relies on convection heating (cooling) if you heat it at the top it won't get as hot. So the higher up the FV, relative to the level of your wort, the cooler your wort will be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi guys,

 

Its getting very cold here over night (1-2 degrees) at the moment so i have to have a heat belt on my brew. It seems to hold around 26-28 degrees.

 

Just wondering what people do if they need to ferment at a lower temp (like lagers). Can i put something in between the belt and the fermenter to stop so much heat getting through?

 

I think if i dont run the belt it will get too cold...

 

Get one of these.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi guys,

 

Its getting very cold here over night (1-2 degrees) at the moment so i have to have a heat belt on my brew. It seems to hold around 26-28 degrees.

 

Just wondering what people do if they need to ferment at a lower temp (like lagers). Can i put something in between the belt and the fermenter to stop so much heat getting through?

 

I think if i dont run the belt it will get too cold...

Hey Alex

 

Order yourself one of these, fix the probe to the side of the FV with the elastic from a pair of undies and plug your heat belt into the unit.

 

While your waiting for it to arrive slide your heat belt up higher on the FV. Your wort is mainly water (not a good conductor of heat) and relies on convection heating (cooling) if you heat it at the top it won't get as hot. So the higher up the FV, relative to the level of your wort, the cooler your wort will be.

 

 

That looks like a good idea, cheers.

I'll slide the belt up for now and that should help.

 

I'd love a fridge but my wife will cut off one of my fingers if i put a fridge in the house, and i'd rather not take up room in the shed.

 

I guess the higher temp is why my brew fully ferments in a matter of 4 days?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought one of the thermostat controllers like scottie put up a link to. It worked brilliant for the fridge at lower temps whilst cold crashing, but I now use the heat setting on a heat mat to keep the bottles warm at 19c. I guess the fridge is a luxury but as for using it on the belt, I think as myself being a new brewer it is a cheap effective way to make better beers and you wouldn't be brewing in those high temp ranges. Good Luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another way to reduce the brew temp is to possibly reduce the setting on the heat belt so it doesn't get so hot in the first place. Of course, that's if the heat belt has a setting that allows this. [biggrin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I bought one of the thermostat controllers like scottie put up a link to. It worked brilliant for the fridge at lower temps whilst cold crashing' date=' but I now use the heat setting on a heat mat to keep the bottles warm at 19c. I guess the fridge is a luxury but as for using it on the belt, I think as myself being a new brewer it is a cheap effective way to make better beers and you wouldn't be brewing in those high temp ranges. Good Luck. [/quote']

 

Bought one of these last night, should help out a lot.

 

I know all beers are different but what sort of temp do most people brew at if 27 is too high? Say for the IPA i just brewed? or the English bitter and SMOTY i'm about to brew?

Is there advantages to having a lower temp?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All beers and yeast are different but if you want a rule of thumb then ferment ales between 18-20 degrees. Not a big deal if you go a couple of degrees higher.

 

Higher temps produce more esters in the beer and can result in some funky flavours. Extremely high temps can cause production of fusel alcohol. That it is the hot alcohol taste that gives you filthy headaches.

 

Getting your temps under control, regardless of how you do it, is the kindest thing you can do for your beer and their little yeasty friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
All beers and yeast are different but if you want a rule of thumb then ferment ales between 18-20 degrees. Not a big deal if you go a couple of degrees higher.

 

Higher temps produce more esters in the beer and can result in some funky flavours. Extremely high temps can cause production of fusel alcohol. That it is the hot alcohol taste that gives you filthy headaches.

 

Getting your temps under control, regardless of how you do it, is the kindest thing you can do for your beer and their little yeasty friends.

 

Thanks, that makes sense. I'll make sure i get the temps down from where they are now.

 

So about 20 would be ok for the english bitter and the SMOTY that i want to do?

 

I don't suppose there is a chart with rough guides for different types of beers? Or does it change with the yeast brand/type too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Alex

As Hairy says 20'C will be OK for the Coopers Kit Ale yeast. When you start using special yeasts just check he manufacturers specs, if buying online from Craft Brewer they list the specs on line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't suppose there is a chart with rough guides for different types of beers? Or does it change with the yeast brand/type too?

 

I haven't seen one but generally as Hairy said, ale you ferment around 18-20C. Lagers are around 10-12C (these are bit more in depth as well). I'm not sure if the yeast brand makes much difference, but it is dependent on whether it is an ale or lager strain. It's also dependent on what kind of flavours you're going for. If, for example, you want a fruity English ale you might ferment it around 22C to get the fruity esters from the yeast. If you want a clean tasting American pale ale you might ferment it at 17-18C. There are a million things you can do, but the key is whatever temp you ferment at, to keep it as stable as you can. The yeast are much happier at stable temps than temps which fluctuate all over the place.

 

And 20C is all good for the SMOTY and EB brews[biggrin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...