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Bruce

How to brew the stout.

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I need help with this, I can\xb4t make heads or tail with this instructions that came with the can it is in Danish.

 

 

 

Could some one tell me howto brew the Stout.

 

 

 

Thanks

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As mentioned, just a standard way works very well indeed.

 

 

 

Which is (roughly):

 

 

 

sterilise everything (use a special brew steriliiser or just lots of boiling water)

 

 

 

1. boil 2 litres water

 

2. mix can of Stout and this boiling water in brewing container, then add 1 kg normal white sugar.

 

3 add 21 litres cold water

 

4 check temperature - want it between 20-27 degrees Celsius optimum, 18 - 34 extremes.

 

5. add yeast,

 

6. Put an airlock on it

 

7 keep between 20-27 optimum, 18-34 extremes, for one week, until fermenting stops

 

8. wash and sterilise 23 litres of bottles (about 30 long necks / 60 stubbies)

 

9. put a teaspoon of sugar into each 750 ml bottle, or half into each 375 ml bottle

 

10 Fill bottles, cap tightly (crown seal / whatever), wait at LEAST 2 weeks, keep bottles between 18-34 degrees.

 

11 wait more time for a better beer

 

 

 

ENJOY! This is a bloody good beer.

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Thanks guys, I was wondering, as we don\xb4t have Brewing enhancer 2 here in Iceland I was thinking about using a product that is made here non alcaholic Malt Extract it comes in 500ml cans ready to drink and the ingrediants are Mat, sugar, yeast, hob, liqorice.

 

 

 

Do you think it would be ok to ad that into the brew and let it ferment.

 

 

 

We have something called Enhacer fro Beer called Kreamyx and the ingre are corn syrup, lactose, glucose, matlo, dextrin of corn, alginate from alga, brewing salts and quillaja.

 

 

 

Also should I use dextrose or White Sugar.

 

 

 

Could this idea work, water, stout, 1kg sugar, beer enhancer malt extract, let ferment. Should the brown sugar come on top of that or should I cut the white sugar down to 500gr.

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Ok I made the first batch of stout, put in 500gr of dark malt (liquid) 250gr Dextrose, 250 gr rawsugar, 500gr brown sugar.

 

 

 

When do I measrue OG, I put the Hydrmeter in and it stood at 5000.

 

 

 

I found this formula somewhere to determine the alcahol level but I don\xb4t remeber where. Could someone help.

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5000 is an odd reading Bruce...this reading is using what units?

 

 

 

The OG for your brew - assuming that the dark malt is 80% solids, mix includes a 1.7kg can of Coopers Stout and the total volume is 23l - should be approx 1.048.

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I thought so too, he hydrometer I used is my father and he uses it with his wine and spirit making, I will descripe this hydrometer it has a black top and from 0 it goes up to 15 and at the bottom it says 120.

 

 

 

Is there a seperate hydrometer for beerbrwwing and wine making.

 

 

 

It is fermenting and the airlock is bubbling and there is froth on the surface and it has a very good smell I want it to be ready now :)

 

 

 

I took the OG after pitching the yeast, maybe that was wrong.

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Your hydrometer may be okay to use...it sounds like it is measuring Specific Gravity as "degrees gravity" ie:

 

.985 = -15

 

.995 = -5

 

1.000 = 0

 

1.005 = 5

 

1.015 = 15

 

1.030 = 30

 

1.050 = 50 (this may have been your OG reading)

 

1.075 = 75

 

1.100 = 100

 

1.120 = 120.

 

 

 

Check to see that it measures "0" when floated in water @ 20C...this should give you some confidence in it.

 

 

 

Approx %Alcohol by Volume = (OG - FG)/7.46

 

OG = Original Gravity prior to fermentation, FG = Final Gravity - two identical readings over two days.

 

add an extra 0.5% to allow for secondary fermentation priming sugar.

 

(This formula is currently under review and is only a rough approximation)

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Thanks Paul, I\xb4ve enclosed a pic I took this afternoons showing my Hydrometer in a sample of the stout brew. And it it stooped at the 25 mark and moved slowly up to the 30 mark.

 

 

 

brew.jpg

 

 

 

Again thanks guys for all the help.

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Nice photo!!

 

 

 

You have used 1 kg of simple sugar (250g Dextrose, 250 g rawsugar, 500g brown sugar) so you should expect the FG to reach the 10 - 15 mark on your hydrometer. Make sure that the ferment temperature remains above 18C.

 

 

 

Next time...try using less simple sugars and more complex (ie malts).

 

 

 

A quick and easy stout recipe:

 

1.7kg Stout,

 

1.7kg Lager,

 

300g Sugar,

 

made to 23l

 

Both yeast sachets.

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Best stout I have had since conversion to the Dark Ales:

 

 

 

1.7kg Can Coopers Stout

 

1.7kg Can Cooper Classic Olde Dark Ale

 

both yeasts (in summer this went Birko...)

 

Water to 23 liters.

 

 

 

Bottle, wait a month and enjoy.

 

 

 

Best, I've had, easiest I've made.

 

 

 

(There is a message there for you kiddies...)

 

 

 

IMHO, of course.

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Hi Greg

 

 

 

You didn't mention sugar .... did you use sugar in the fermenting process?????

 

 

 

Paul ... your recipe mentions just 300gm of sugar ... I'm confused. What ferments to produce the alcohol???? What sort of sugar are you referring to?

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thanks Greg ... will give it a try sometime.

 

 

 

I'm not much taken with the many recipes which sound like they chuck in everything in the pantry ... call me a pleb, but I like it fairly basic.

 

 

 

Cheers

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I just opened a bottle of the Stout I made and it was fantastic, the flavor is awesome, the mouthfeel of the malt, just name it. Everybody love it. I higly recommend it.

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