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c40690

Fermentation Stress

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Hi

 

 

 

I am a first time brewer, but am unsure if I am fermenting my batch correctly. I can see condenstaion on the lid, and small bubbles on the side on the plastic fermenter so I think I am fermenting the Larger. BUT, the airlock does not seem to bubble, and the water has not remained level, with the water level on the left side higher than the right. The tempreture is 24c.

 

 

 

Am I just stressing that I have stuffed my first brew up, or are things Ok.

 

 

 

Would appreciate some advise or ideas, as I am looking forward to my first home made beer.

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if the water levels in the airlock are uneven, then that is good.

 

 

 

everything sounds like its going to plan perfectly. :)

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The water level in the airlock will be uneven, and i believe that's due to the difference in air pressure..

 

This is true. It also means that there is a good seal with the fermenter lid. The difference in pressure can only exist with a good seal.

 

If you've got a lot of condensation under the lid, maybe you bottled it while i was quite hot or humid??

 

Condensation is actually a sign of active fermentation. And I don't see how it could have been bottled yet...?

 

If you're getting no bubbling through the airlock then perhaps you don't have a proper seal happening.. if you're using a new homebrew kit then that's unlikely but possible..

 

If you don't have a proper seal then the airlock levels can't be uneven.

 

if you think that there's been no fermentation, then maybe the yeast is dead??

 

 

 

If there has been no fermentation then check to make sure the temperature is between 21-27 degrees celcius. It should still ferment between 18-30 degrees.

 

the yeast would only be dead if it is well past its use by date, or it was exposed to temperatures higher than 30 degrees.

 

 

 

if you've followed the coopers instructions properly then you will get a great beer. :)

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The info below comes from the FAQ section of our website.

 

 

 

Is my brew fermenting?

Many homebrewers wrongly assume that the yeast is not working because there is no bubbling through the airlock.

The airlock is fitted to allow gas to escape and prevent micro-organisms and wild yeasts from entering the fermenter.

Rather than rely on your airlock as an indicator of fermentation, look for condensation inside the lid, a scum ring at the top of the wort, sediment on the bottom and the specific gravity dropping from 1040 toward 1006 (typically).

 

 

 

Dead yeast?...most likely not!! The yeast supplied with the white cans will ferment at temps as low as 18C and as high as 40C (although it doesn't make a very nice beer at excessively high temps).

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Thanks for all the advise. Time will tell if I have passed the test or not and get a good brew. Well by the weekend anyway.

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The yeast in the white Coopers tins is like Superboy on red cordial.

 

 

 

I have pitched the yeast when the thermometer on the side of the bucket was off the scale. Beer came out ok.

 

 

 

I have also had brews where the airlock was bubbling before I had finished cleaning up - literally within half an hour it was out of the blocks and running hard for 1006 ( If I didn't have to work for a bloody living, I could have bottled that brew two days later).

 

 

 

On the down side it is also the yeast most likley to spray froth and foam two feet accross the kitchen bench.

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Superboy on red cordial.. what an apt description. I've got a lager going at the moment that spent a good 12 hours spurting through the airlock, even when I cooled its temper from 22 to 16\xb0C.

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