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MichaelB37

1st Brew Question :)

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4 weeks ago I was also of the opinion that Lagers can get stuffed. I've had too many that taste like someone poured water into an ashtray then into a bottle and put a cap on it - then wacked a Steinlager label on it [sick]

 

BUT, I just visited the Czech republic, home of the pale clear lager aka Pilsener. Try a Budweiser Budvar and you're opinion may change my friends - mine did. I now have a case of the Dark Lager waiting for me at my local bottle'o [bandit]

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Hey Michael,

 

You can try the widely used ice bath. Prepare a larger container than the fermenter with water and drop some frozen water bottles on it. Temp should drop a bit.

 

You can also try weting towels and wraping the fermenter with them. Then placin a fan on it really slow speed so it helps cool a bit more.

 

I think the best method is the ice bath, since the towels would only work for a few mins prob an hour till it dries up.

 

And yea the optimal temp range for a fermenter to be is within 18-20c. At 24 ur beer might still produce alcohol, but it might not work properly your yeast so it might not drop down to the final gravity intended.

 

Hope this helps. Cheers

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At 24 ur beer might still produce alcohol, but it might not work properly your yeast so it might not drop down to the final gravity intended.

 

This is not correct.

 

Yeast are MORE active at higher temps... ferment at 30 and see what happens.. they will chomp though it in a few days... BUT...they will produce buckets of FUSEL ALCOHOLS and other such related nasties in such amounts that it will not be possible for the yeast clean it all up.

 

In all instances, this is my advice for a new brewer.

 

Follow the Yeast manufacturers recommendations on fermentation temps (with the exception being the Kit instructions and fermenting above 20)

 

If you can, get a specialty yeast, Nottingham and US-05 are great (For Ales) if you can maintain sub 20 fermentation temperatures.

 

ALWAYS rehydrate your dry yeast and do not bottle as soon as Terminal Gravity is achieved, give it another 4-7 days once TG has been reached.

 

Dont open the fermenter to have a look unless you are dry hopping and even then do it as quick as possible.

 

ed: For temps, if you can get away with it, half fill your laundry tub with water and place the FV in there with a few frozen drink containers to get the temps down, once at an appropriate temerature, remove the ice bottles and you will find that temperature swings take quite a bit longer.

 

Yob

 

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Dont open the fermenter to have a look unless you are dry hopping and even then do it as quick as possible.

But what if you want to take photos? [innocent]

 

Otherwise, +1 to everything Yob just said.

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I use the wet towel method, however I put the fermenter in a saucer thing, fill that with water and then wrap the towel around it, and submerge it in the water, it acts like a candle wick. I usually tip cold water over it every morning too. Now that we have new laundry tubs (that don't leak), might be able to try the other method with the frozen drink bottles. [cool]

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I use the wet towel method' date=' however I put the fermenter in a saucer thing, fill that with water and then wrap the towel around it, and submerge it in the water, it acts like a candle wick. I usually tip cold water over it every morning too. Now that we have new laundry tubs (that don't leak), might be able to try the other method with the frozen drink bottles. [cool']

 

^^^ This. I also used a combination. I had a large container with water that I sat the fermenter in. I put ice bottles around it. Plus I put a couple of towels over it that also wicked up the cold water out of the ice bath and put the fan on it. Was able to maintain a temp of about 14 degrees (ambient temp was about 20).

 

In the end the effort shit me so I acquired an old fridge off a friend and use that with a temp controller. So much easier! Set the temp, mix the brew, shove it in the fridge, leave it.

 

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ALWAYS rehydrate your dry yeast

 

But I couldn't be bothered [pinched] ...I'm more than happy with the results from sprinkling dry yeast. I've done extensive tests with various methods and I find no great benefit from rehydrating yeast.

 

However personal rehydration after a few beers and a berocca before bed does wonders for waking up fresh the next day.

 

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But I couldn't be bothered [pinched] ...I'm more than happy with the results from sprinkling dry yeast. I've done extensive tests with various methods and I find no great benefit from rehydrating yeast.

 

+1

 

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But I couldn't be bothered [pinched] ...I'm more than happy with the results from sprinkling dry yeast. I've done extensive tests with various methods and I find no great benefit from rehydrating yeast.

 

+1

 

I haven't tried rehydrating dry yeast, but I've never had a problem with the sprinkle method. And that's using LHBS yeast packets as well as those that come with kits.

 

That said I've never had an infection from opening the lid, and while I now look after temps better, my earlier brews were OK with the wildly fluctuating ambient temperatures I brewed with in summer (well, the honey blonde I now realise was pretty damn funky, no doubt due to the high 20s temps).

 

Not to say Yob's perfectionism doesn't bring in a better result, but I think for newbies it's hard enough being patient without being stressed out that you're making some cardinal sin ;-)

 

Just my 2c worth. FTR I've taken on a lot of Yob's advice on here, so don't stop giving it. I learn heaps :-)

 

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+2 I'm happy with results from sprinkling dry yeast too. What is the reason for rehydrating it though? Does it get the ferment started faster or is it more about determining how viable the yeast are? I'm not being smart here either, just interested to know[lol]

 

Cheers,

Kelsey

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It has more to do with the fact that in the first few minutes of rehydrating, the cell wall of the yeast can not control what passes through... This is an incredibly important time for yeast as many enzymes can be affected and disrupted resulting in up to a 50% mortality rate (refer the yeast book and various other sources like whitelabs etc)

 

Osmotic Pressures are also a large concern in the early stages of rehydrating yeast..

 

I guess it boils down to the fact that i like to think i am a good yeast daddy and i do all i can to ensure that my yeast are healthy (and by default my beer as good as it can be) and the fact that I will likely be re-using it in a subsequent brew and as such want minimal mutations.

 

Im not suggesting that everyone need adhere to these procedures, but they are, in my brewery, best practice... amd as such is the advice i like to hand out.

 

If you start with the best practice its easier to slip into routine but if you start off with bad (in my world) habits its harder to turn that around into good practice.

 

2.5 pennies fwiw

 

Yob

 

edit: phucking phone posting had to be cleaned up and links inserted

 

also, all 'pro' literature says to rehydrate, only the homebrew market says to sprinkle and I would like to be pointed to any brewery that sprinkles on a pro level... it just doesnt happen and probably for a good reason?

 

YMMV

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I know your right Yob and I understand the science behind the reasoning for rehydrating. But I consider myself more of a learn-to-take-care-of-yourself-and-we-will-both-benefit-from-it-but-don't-tell-your-mother yeast daddy.

 

If the benefits were more than cellular and made a perceptible difference to the taste of my beer I would probably do it myself.

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learn-to-take-care-of-yourself-and-we-will-both-benefit-from-it-but-don't-tell-your-mother yeast daddy.

 

[lol] I hear that Muddy... I guess at the end of the day I just want to give the advice that I think to be of the best value to a new brewer.. I dont think the process of rehydrating yeast is all that complicated and though Ive never done any comparison brews I have researched a hell of a lot on Yeast and all the good literature that Ive read point to this..

 

I must add that Im heading down the road of having my own Yeast Library so yeast health to me is very important, If I was pitching and chucking would I be so anal? I doubt it.

 

Yeast and Hops... 2 things that get me going.

 

well.. enough ranting for now.. I hope Ive shed a bit of light to new eyes and Im off to rehydrate some yeast [lol]

 

Yob

 

edit: and also I 'perceive' lag time to be less [rightful]

 

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Yob what is your preferred method for re-hydrating the yeast. I plan on doing a lager next week while the weather is still cold and am using SAF S23 yeast. I have one sachet but using Mr Malty I should be using two. Would you re culture and store at the end or just tip it into the garden.

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I would answer but you asked Yob ([crying] ) so I'll let him answer. It's time to go and watch the footy anyway [crying] ......[biggrin]

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Muddy feel free, you know I value your charmed opinion. I just didn't think you re hydrated [lol] [lol] [lol] [lol]. The yeast that is [ninja]

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I am pretty sure Yob gradually introduces the yeast to the wort before pitching. I can't recall the exact procedure but it is much more complicated than mine.

 

I just rehydrate in 250ml of boiled water at around mid-20's degrees.

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Im gettin fairly 'warm' now so will try to make this as clear as possible..

 

I have a glass measuring jug and I put 120ml of tap water in it and microwave the sheet out of it for a few mins..

 

I then place it in the sink with enough cold water (after 5 mins) to cover the inside volume.. I also have a sanitised Thermometer in there and have gladwarap over the top of it all to keep any airborne contaminants out..

 

(With US-05 - refer manufacturers specifications for whatever yeast you have [rightful] ) When the temp reaches +/- 3 'c of 27 (I usually wait till it is 27'c) I sprinkle the yeast and then agitate the flask until ALL the yeast is Hydrated.

 

After 15 mins, keeping in mind that the temp is still quite high, I give it a bit of a stir with the thermometer.. In another 5 mins, I run off 100ml from the FV into the flask making 2X the volume in the flask.. this brings the temp down gently and does not expose the yeast to thermal shock.. bit of a stir.. repeat.

 

wait 10-15 mins and the temp will be about pitching temp (17.5'c Ales)

 

I whisk the sheet out of my wort and pitch the flask which is at about 350ml and almost breaking out of the flask..

 

wait 2 weeks, cold condition, bottle, wait (x) enjoy

 

... I promise to do another photo guide on this in the near future.

 

Yob

 

edit: I say again.. Lagers? pfffff I havnt enough life to do lagers...

 

Refer Mr Malty for all your Yeast calcs mate.. tis wat I do [ninja]

 

double ed: ferkkk that was an effort... wheres me beer [lol]

 

third edit: Notto

 

refer point 4 in this linked above for Nottingham, My equal favorite yeast

 

Yob Out

 

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I agree with both Yob and Muddy on this. I'll explain.

If I'm doing a kit"n kilo type brew then I'm not to bothered about the re-hydration proses that much, particulate when its the under the lid yeast ( Coopers Ale/Lager strain the exception).

Having said that if it is a brew of high gravity or I have spent a lot of money on the yeast, then the re-hydration proses is well worth it. Even more so if you plan to harvest the yeast for other brews. Or as Yob is doing and so am I, is to build a little library of yeast strains.

I realize it can be a bit much for some Brewers in the beginning but as you learn more about what goes on in your brew and what you can do after your brew has finished, in particular with the yeast it can be well worth the effort and more importantly the knowledge.

 

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Thanks so much Yob, you're lesson was awesome, I would like to build a yeast bank also. Jason thanks to you also much appreciated. Yeast is becoming a little bit of an interest. Quite a complex little being. Working in the medical field the whole cell thing is very interesting. Thanks guys[happy]

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Hay Benny, I work in the medical field too, nothing to stressful though, just a painter in a hospital. And before you ask NO I haven't got to the end and started again. After 10 years I still haven't got till the end. And it's the same with brewing ...you never get to the end of learning this wonderful craft. ENJOY[happy]

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Hey guys, haven't been on in a while and thought I would give you an update :)

I bottled my brew last Friday and it went perfectly, the brew tasted fine and smelt fine. Its been sat in bottles, in the box the kit came in since then. Its warm up here about 25*C, I heard as long as it was over 18*C it would be fine?

 

Cant wait to try some of this :D

 

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Also I love Newcastle Brown Ale (the older kind from a few years back before it seemed to change) so if anyone can recommend something like this ill love you forever :P

 

Nut Brown

 

Not a newcastle clone, but this brown ale is my favourite extract receipe at the moment.

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