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Temperature and time before bottling


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Good day

Greetings from South Africa to my fellow Brewster's. I got a question that's probably been asked frequently, when brewing ales we are advised to leave in fermenter for 7 to 10 days or after 6 days to take a SG reading  and repeat process until SG is steady over 2 days, before bottling. I don't take OG and SG readings as I don't have the cylinders for the hydrometer. My question is if the temperature for an Australian pale ale or a coopers stout drops below 68F (20 celcsius) do we leave it to ferment for double the time 14 to 20 days.

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57 minutes ago, Mozzcat said:

Good day

Greetings from South Africa to my fellow Brewster's. I got a question that's probably been asked frequently, when brewing ales we are advised to leave in fermenter for 7 to 10 days or after 6 days to take a SG reading  and repeat process until SG is steady over 2 days, before bottling. I don't take OG and SG readings as I don't have the cylinders for the hydrometer. My question is if the temperature for an Australian pale ale or a coopers stout drops below 68F (20 celcsius) do we leave it to ferment for double the time 14 to 20 days.

HI bud I'm also from S Africa. I don't think your logic is 100% right but the colder the temp, the longer it will take to brew. I generally leave mine in about 8 to 10 days and also don't take OG and FG reading. I just try keep the FV as warm as I can especially during initial fermentation. Is the krausen completely died down? 

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I am brewing a coopers stout I added the yeast yesterday morning at 27 C and it dropped to 20C this morning  there was no action in the airlock I opened the lid to check if Krausen has formed and it was foamy and when I closed the lid, the air lock went into heavy action and hasn't stopped since then. The temperature went between 20 C and 22 C. today should I leave it for 10 days. 

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10 minutes ago, Mozzcat said:

I am brewing a coopers stout I added the yeast yesterday morning at 27 C and it dropped to 20C this morning  there was no action in the airlock I opened the lid to check if Krausen has formed and it was foamy and when I closed the lid, the air lock went into heavy action and hasn't stopped since then. The temperature went between 20 C and 22 C. today should I leave it for 10 days. 

Temperatures sound fine. Try not to open the lid if u can help it. Don't want an infection. Try keep it at that temp range u mentioned. 10 days will be fine then🍻

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38 minutes ago, Mozzcat said:

Thanks cause I been reading that people leave stouts in the fermentation bucket for 4 weeks to get a higher ABV

Hmm ok. The only way I know how to get higher ABV is add more fermentables ie dextrose or malt powder etc.  U might get a very slight increase but not much. What did u add with the 1.7kg can? 

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1 hour ago, Mozzcat said:

I added a 1kg brown sugar I allways add that to my ales and my friends says it much stronger in alchol than a black label

Lekker man maybe try a 1kg dry malt power or a brew enhancer 2 next time for more body, I find sugar makes a thinner beer. Good luck and let us know once u done🍻

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2 hours ago, Mozzcat said:

Thanks cause I been reading that people leave stouts in the fermentation bucket for 4 weeks to get a higher ABV

ABV is dependent on the amount of fermentable sugars in the wort and when they're gone, they're gone, no matter how long it is left in the fermenter. Time has nothing to do with that. Once bottled/kegged, dark beers are best left for a few weeks/months to mature as they get better over time but ABV doesn't increase. 

To answer an earlier question, no, you don't have to keep it in the fermenter for longer. The best temperature for an ale us in the range of 18-20C and it should certainly be done within 10 days. You should also avoid temps getting above 25C as the yeast will start throwing some potentially unwanted flavours. 

If you add a kilo of brown sugar, your beer gets a lot stronger. More fermentable sugar = higher ABV. At least up to the point where the yeast dies of alcohol poisoning and the sugar remains unfermented.

Do yourself a favour and get a measuring cylinder for the hydrometer. It is the ultimate authority on when fermentation has ceased. If you bottle too early, you risk bottle bombs.

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Ideally it would be good to get a tube for the hydrometer to check when your beer is done. In the absence of the tube you could just leave the CLEANED and SANITISED hydrometer floating in the brew. It will give you accurate SG readings BUT it will most likely be hard to read though the opaque plastic of the Coopers fermenting vessel or if you don't have an opaque vessel like the Coopers ones you'll need to lift the lid, which is not best practice because it can introduce unwanted nasties. So leave reading the hydrometer until something like day 8 or later and keep lid lifting to an absolute minimum.
There's more than one way to skin a @Mozzcat (Ba-boom-tissshhhh!)

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11 hours ago, PintsMeLocal said:

Lekker man maybe try a 1kg dry malt power or a brew enhancer 2 next time for more body, I find sugar makes a thinner beer. Good luck and let us know once u done🍻

Thanks will do 

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11 hours ago, Aussiekraut said:

ABV is dependent on the amount of fermentable sugars in the wort and when they're gone, they're gone, no matter how long it is left in the fermenter. Time has nothing to do with that. Once bottled/kegged, dark beers are best left for a few weeks/months to mature as they get better over time but ABV doesn't increase. 

To answer an earlier question, no, you don't have to keep it in the fermenter for longer. The best temperature for an ale us in the range of 18-20C and it should certainly be done within 10 days. You should also avoid temps getting above 25C as the yeast will start throwing some potentially unwanted flavours. 

If you add a kilo of brown sugar, your beer gets a lot stronger. More fermentable sugar = higher ABV. At least up to the point where the yeast dies of alcohol poisoning and the sugar remains unfermented.

Do yourself a favour and get a measuring cylinder for the hydrometer. It is the ultimate authority on when fermentation has ceased. If you bottle too early, you risk bottle bombs.

So 10 days I will be safe from bottles exploding cause I bottle in glass bottles

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10 hours ago, MUZZY said:

Ideally it would be good to get a tube for the hydrometer to check when your beer is done. In the absence of the tube you could just leave the CLEANED and SANITISED hydrometer floating in the brew. It will give you accurate SG readings BUT it will most likely be hard to read though the opaque plastic of the Coopers fermenting vessel or if you don't have an opaque vessel like the Coopers ones you'll need to lift the lid, which is not best practice because it can introduce unwanted nasties. So leave reading the hydrometer until something like day 8 or later and keep lid lifting to an absolute minimum.
There's more than one way to skin a @Mozzcat (Ba-boom-tissshhhh!)

Thanks 

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11 hours ago, PintsMeLocal said:

Lekker man maybe try a 1kg dry malt power or a brew enhancer 2 next time for more body, I find sugar makes a thinner beer. Good luck and let us know once u done🍻

Yes I will take a picture or video if possible I am new to this group not see how this platform works 

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1 hour ago, Mozzcat said:

So 10 days I will be safe from bottles exploding cause I bottle in glass bottles

It depends on the temperature of the fermentation but generally, yes. If it was below 18, it may take a few days extra, if it is above, a few less. I usually ferment my ales at 18C and by day 8, all is done and dusted. Lagers (using lager yeast and fermenting at 13C), take an extra week, give or take.

You should be fine.

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16 hours ago, Mozzcat said:

Thanks cause I been reading that people leave stouts in the fermentation bucket for 4 weeks to get a higher ABV

Humbug.

Keep it between 18c and about 24c. Bottle in 8-10 days. 10 better.

 

Drink in 3 months. Sheel be right mate.

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