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Kegging video tutorials for beginners.


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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Classic Brewing Co said:

I appreciate your reply, the only issue is, I have 1 x keg, 1 x gas bottle & I have got a brew already in the keg & connected to the gas.

I didn't want to be disconnecting & reconnecting gas bottles.

For that reason it would seem simpler to bottle it.

Cheers.

to be honest Phil  , i thought thats all you had and thought how the heck are going to do this if you have a keg already on the hop

so what i mentioned  save that in the bank when you have 4+ kegs lol  i can see you having 20 kegs full by the end of the year

if you have only 1  keg   and is in use 

how was you going to store the stout in the keg  to store  , unless you magicly get a keg by the time your stout is ready

Edited by ozdevil
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44 minutes ago, ozdevil said:

to be honest Phil  , i thought thats all you had and thought how the heck are going to do this if you have a keg already on the hop

so what i mentioned  save that in the bank when you have 4+ kegs lol  i can see you having 20 kegs full by the end of the year

if you have only 1  keg   and is in use 

how was you going to store the stout in the keg  to store  , unless you magicly get a keg by the time your stout is ready

Another keg is not the issue, I can get one here in 2-3 days, the Stout is only a few days in the FV.

My question was can I, when it's ready simply store it in a new keg without doing anything else.

Bottling it is also not an issue.

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9 minutes ago, Classic Brewing Co said:

Another keg is not the issue, I can get one here in 2-3 days, the Stout is only a few days in the FV.

My question was can I, when it's ready simply store it in a new keg without doing anything else.

Bottling it is also not an issue.

simple answer is yes you can.

my origional response to you was the best way to look after your beer and getting benifit from it

its totally up to you how you look after that keg.


disconnecting a gas bottle for 5-10 minutes to purge oxygen out of the keg   is not difficult Phil

but to give you the worse case and what you want to hear!

yes you can  keg and store with out doing anything with it.


i'm sure you want the best for your beer Phil   , so i try to give the best solution i know, if others give you better then mine i will also learn as well.


I am very sorry for trying to help you Phil, i guess i am not in the  "A Grade Team"   


 


 

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1 hour ago, ozdevil said:

i get your thoughts  with a smaller amount but i would treating the 19l as a bottle  and would carbonate  with sugar to your desired level  at room temp.

your really wasting time  using a small amount of sugar  just  to remove oxygen  , its just easier with co2  from the start and your not wasting that much by doing so to be honest

using your thoughts you have to wait until  that sugar converts to co2    before removing it and that could take a good couple of days and in the mean time you have created an oxygenated beer (not that i think you would)  and you have to remember  in a few days to purge that oxygen out as it wont happen straight away

co2  straight in purge  and place a blanket of co2 in headspace job done in a 1 minutes flat from putting lid on the keg.


Prime the keg to carbonate by priming sugar by all means  

Hi Oz.
I'm using those 8l plastic kegs. They're basically a big bottle. I have 12 of them but only 3 tap heads. It's been simpler for me to just prime the bottles/kegs a little, pop the lid on and store like a bottle until I'm ready to drink them. I haven't been fully priming them because I'm trying to minimise sediment.
If I was to fully carbonate them I'd use 60 - 80g sugar but I'm only using 30-40g. The CO2 tank will do the finishing carbonation.
To purge them with CO2 it's a fiddly job because I have to put a tap head on each full keg - tap heads I don't have.

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44 minutes ago, Classic Brewing Co said:

Another keg is not the issue, I can get one here in 2-3 days, the Stout is only a few days in the FV.

My question was can I, when it's ready simply store it in a new keg without doing anything else.

Bottling it is also not an issue.

Should be right. I have a Choc Milk Porter maturing in a keg. It's been sitting there for 2 months now. All I did was hook it up to gas for a few minutes and burped it a few times to get as much oxygen out as I can, then left it at room temp. It'll probably go in the kegerator in a few weeks when I get back. Then I'll chill it down and once cold, I'll gas it up as per normal. 

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7 minutes ago, Aussiekraut said:

Should be right. I have a Choc Milk Porter maturing in a keg. It's been sitting there for 2 months now. All I did was hook it up to gas for a few minutes and burped it a few times to get as much oxygen out as I can, then left it at room temp. It'll probably go in the kegerator in a few weeks when I get back. Then I'll chill it down and once cold, I'll gas it up as per normal. 

Thankyou  Aussiekruat  , this was my original point but adding the priming sugar ready to go when Phils ready to put the keg on.

@all
if you have access to a 2nd keg  and want to store   wether in  fridge or room temp do your maths and prime  so it is ready for when you want it on tap and give the beer its best advantage


 

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My advice to you @Classic Brewing Co would be the same as @ozdevil and @Aussiekraut. Just purge the keg, don't be concerned about connecting and disconnecting a gas line as it just takes a few seconds and is what the disconnects are designed to do very easily. The stout sitting in a purged keg will be fine stored either in a fridge or at room temperature.

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1 hour ago, Aussiekraut said:

Should be right. I have a Choc Milk Porter maturing in a keg. It's been sitting there for 2 months now. All I did was hook it up to gas for a few minutes and burped it a few times to get as much oxygen out as I can, then left it at room temp. It'll probably go in the kegerator in a few weeks when I get back. Then I'll chill it down and once cold, I'll gas it up as per normal. 

OK thanks, sounds fine. Cheers.

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Posted (edited)

@Classic Brewing CoSome sound advice here from @ozdevil

In short:

  • Fill your keg with beer, connect gas bottle and set regulator to 30psi.
  • Fill the keg with gas until it's at pressure.
  • Release the pressure by pulling on the pressure release valve.
  • Repeat the fill and release process a couple of times to purge oxygen out of the headspace.
  • Finally - fill with gas until full at 30psi.
  • Disconnect the gas bottle and store your keg somewhere temperature stable.
  • When it comes time, don't forget to carbonate your beer before you connect to your tap to serve. Your beer must be cold. You can either do this quickly at high pressure by agitating the keg (the "rock and roll" method) or over the course of a week with the keg connected to gas at lower pressure whilst stored in the fridge. 

If you have one of these gas connects on your bottle:

kl09010_-_ball_lock_with_check_valve1.jp

You have the advantage that it makes noise when the gas is flowing through it which assists you to know when your keg is up to pressure.

If you can get another gas bottle (yes I know more $$) then you can use one for serving that is permanently attached to your fridge and the other for purging and carbonating.

Cheers!

 

Edited by Dustin Frothman
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1 hour ago, Dustin Frothman said:

@Classic Brewing CoSome sound advice here from @ozdevil

In short:

  • Fill your keg with beer, connect gas bottle and set regulator to 30psi.
  • Fill the keg with gas until it's at pressure.
  • Release the pressure by pulling on the pressure release valve.
  • Repeat the fill and release process a couple of times to purge oxygen out of the headspace.
  • Finally - fill with gas until full at 30psi.
  • Disconnect the gas bottle and store your keg somewhere temperature stable.
  • When it comes time, don't forget to carbonate your beer before you connect to your tap to serve. Your beer must be cold. You can either do this quickly at high pressure by agitating the keg (the "rock and roll" method) or over the course of a week with the keg connected to gas at lower pressure whilst stored in the fridge. 

If you have one of these gas connects on your bottle:

kl09010_-_ball_lock_with_check_valve1.jp

You have the advantage that it makes noise when the gas is flowing through it which assists you to know when your keg is up to pressure.

If you can get another gas bottle (yes I know more $$) then you can use one for serving that is permanently attached to your fridge and the other for purging and carbonating.

Cheers!

 

Hi Dustin,

Thanks for your response, I intend to have 4 Taps & 4-5 kegs, ATM I have just the one, the Stout won't be ready for a while so this time I will probably just bottle it until I can get the rest of the gear installed. I also have a couple of No Chill Cubes so there is another option for the next couple of AG brews.

Cheers.

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49 minutes ago, Classic Brewing Co said:

Hi Dustin,

Thanks for your response, I intend to have 4 Taps & 4-5 kegs, ATM I have just the one, the Stout won't be ready for a while so this time I will probably just bottle it until I can get the rest of the gear installed. I also have a couple of No Chill Cubes so there is another option for the next couple of AG brews.

Cheers.

Good idea.

Considering that stouts are usually best aged a little, you’d probably not want to take up a keg for 6 months whilst you’re waiting for it to be ready to drink.

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16 minutes ago, Dustin Frothman said:

Good idea.

Considering that stouts are usually best aged a little, you’d probably not want to take up a keg for 6 months whilst you’re waiting for it to be ready to drink.

Correct I was thinking that, sometimes it's nice to grab a bottle of stout that is a few months old, what am I talking about - sometimes !!

 

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On 5/11/2022 at 7:25 AM, MUZZY said:

I don't know how long it will last but have you considered using just a small amount of priming sugar to create CO2 and remove oxygen in the keg? Then it won't need to be refrigerated or on gas.

I undershot the OG on my first two AG attempts so to compensate the lack of booze I made sure I put priming sugar in the keg (dissolved in water). That should give an extra 0.5% kick which can be necessary after a hard day working/SWMBO, or kid grief.... whatever.

I put a layer of CO2 in as well. I then leave the keg in the boiler room at around 23° for two weeks, like I would with bottles.

My fridge is a bit small and can only fit two 19 litre cornies. It should be able to fit three 10 litre kegs though, so I'll have to drill though the third tap, this one for the nitro bottle.

I still haven't completely mastered the beer line length and the pour is inconsistent. Plenty more tinkering around to do...

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2 hours ago, Dustin Frothman said:

Good idea.

Considering that stouts are usually best aged a little, you’d probably not want to take up a keg for 6 months whilst you’re waiting for it to be ready to drink.

That long ? Damn, I was hoping a month or so... 😰

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