Jump to content
dosdan

Coopers Real Ale vs Aust. Pale Ale

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

I've brewed RA 4 times now, trying different yeasts, L/DME, hops additions and brew temps to reduce the strange "greenish" taste. But it's still there, so I'm permanently switching to Aust. Pale Ale (brewed 3 or 4 times so far) which I find a lot better tasting.

Does anyone know what hops are used in RA  (and in OzPA, if you know)?

Is RA supposed to emulate a commercial beer? If so, which one?

Dan.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by dosdan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, dosdan said:

I've brewed RA 4 times now, trying different yeasts, L/DME, hops additions and brew temps to reduce the strange "greenish" taste. But it's still there, so I'm permanently switching to Aust. Pale Ale (brewed 3 or 4 times so far) which I find a lot better tasting.

Does anyone know what hops are used in RA  (and in OzPA, if you know)?

Is RA supposed to emulate a commercial beer? If so, which one?

Dan.

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Dan,

I know for a fact Coopers Pale Ale has Pride of Ringwood Hops, I have their fact sheet, but not sure about the other one.

Cheers

Phil

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, dosdan said:

Is RA supposed to emulate a commercial beer? If so, which one?

Dan.

Hi Dan. No, it is not supposed to emulate a commercial beer. PB2, the former moderator of the forum, once explained how it was named: Coopers pumped the IBUs up higher than what was common for the day. This was long before IPAs became popular. 

I use the APA kit as a base for most of my recipes. Great kit with a nice yeast (ale/lager blend). 

Cheers,

Christina.

 

Edited by ChristinaS1
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Dan,

I find the APA kit a good one too. I haven’t tried the Real Ale kit yet so can’t really comment on why that particular kit would give a “greenish taste”. 
I have had what I describe as a green or apple cider flavour before in other kits though. Some things you may like to consider:

1) some yeasts can give off an ester that is described as green apple. Try keeping your brew at a constant temperature, and at the lower end of its recommended range. This is especially important in the first couple of days. This will help reduce esters overall. Also leave the brew in the fermenter for a couple of days after fermentation appears “finished”. 
2) Try a different yeast. US05 and Nottingham are both fairly neutral ale yeasts in my view (others may have a different view - it is subjective I guess). 
3) Reduce the amount of sugar or dextrose in your recipe. I’m not sure if you use table sugar or dextrose in your recipe. In my experience excessive amounts of sugar can seem to promote an apple cider like taste (which does seem to fade a little over time). I stick to a max of 250g dextrose these days. 
4) Time. How long are you letting your beer age for before consuming? I know Coopers say “after two weeks” but I age mine for four weeks at the absolute minimum. They’re better after 8 weeks though. Time can help reduce that “green” young beer taste. 
 

Keep brewing and try different things. There’s plenty of help available from the brewers on this forum. 
Best of luck. TB

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use RA as a base for many of my beers and I use Nottingham yeast - never had anything I'd describe as 'greenish' from them. I've started recently using APA as a base for my XPA clones and I'm undecided as to which I prefer.

I think @Tone boymight have you covered - check process and timings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wiki has an interesting entry on the origin of the term 'Real Ale' ...

REAL ALE

Real ale is the name coined by the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) for "beer brewed from traditional ingredients, matured by secondary fermentation in the container from which it is dispensed, and served without the use of extraneous carbon dioxide".

Cask and bottle conditioned beers are referred to as real ale by CAMRA, as both fit its description of beers served from a container in which they have undergone secondary fermentation.

The fundamental distinction between real and other ales is that the former are not filtered and the yeast is still present and living in the container from which the real ale is served, although it will have settled to the bottom and is usually not poured into the glass. The natural carbon dioxide is lost during filtration so filtered beer has to be artificially re-carbonated. This can make the beer very 'gassy'. Because the yeast is still present and alive in real ale, a slow process of secondary fermentation continues in the cask or bottle on the way to the consumer, allowing the beer to retain its natural carbonation. Another distinction is that real ale should be served without the aid of added carbon dioxide, or "top pressure" as it is commonly known. Common dispensing methods are the handpump, or "by gravity" direct from the cask. Electric pumps are occasionally seen, especially in the Midlands and Scotland. Water pumps, powered by mains water pressure, were the traditional means of dispensing draught beer in Scotland but this method is discontinued.

The expression "real ale" has been heavily promoted by CAMRA to attract the attention of the media in the UK. The term was coined in the 1970s, when there were very few independent breweries left, and most production had gone over to filtered and pasteurised ales served under carbon dioxide pressure ("keg beer").

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campaign_for_Real_Ale

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Thirsty Jim said:

Wiki has an interesting entry on the origin of the term 'Real Ale' ...

REAL ALE

Real ale is the name coined by the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) for "beer brewed from traditional ingredients, matured by secondary fermentation in the container from which it is dispensed, and served without the use of extraneous carbon dioxide".

Cask and bottle conditioned beers are referred to as real ale by CAMRA, as both fit its description of beers served from a container in which they have undergone secondary fermentation.

The fundamental distinction between real and other ales is that the former are not filtered and the yeast is still present and living in the container from which the real ale is served, although it will have settled to the bottom and is usually not poured into the glass. The natural carbon dioxide is lost during filtration so filtered beer has to be artificially re-carbonated. This can make the beer very 'gassy'. Because the yeast is still present and alive in real ale, a slow process of secondary fermentation continues in the cask or bottle on the way to the consumer, allowing the beer to retain its natural carbonation. Another distinction is that real ale should be served without the aid of added carbon dioxide, or "top pressure" as it is commonly known. Common dispensing methods are the handpump, or "by gravity" direct from the cask. Electric pumps are occasionally seen, especially in the Midlands and Scotland. Water pumps, powered by mains water pressure, were the traditional means of dispensing draught beer in Scotland but this method is discontinued.

The expression "real ale" has been heavily promoted by CAMRA to attract the attention of the media in the UK. The term was coined in the 1970s, when there were very few independent breweries left, and most production had gone over to filtered and pasteurised ales served under carbon dioxide pressure ("keg beer").

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campaign_for_Real_Ale

That's what I would call Real Ale.

I used to work with a couple of blokes who had quite a bit to do with CAMRA.
This was probably early 80's though.
Looking back now there were some awful beers available around that time in pubs.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/10/2021 at 8:55 PM, ChristinaS1 said:

Hi Dan. No, it is not supposed to emulate a commercial beer. PB2, the former moderator of the forum, once explained how it was named: Coopers pumped the IBUs up higher than what was common for the day. This was long before IPAs became popular. 

I use the APA kit as a base for most of my recipes. Great kit with a nice yeast (ale/lager blend). 

Cheers,

Christina.

 

 

On 6/10/2021 at 5:35 PM, CLASSIC said:

Hi Dan,

I know for a fact Coopers Pale Ale has Pride of Ringwood Hops, I have their fact sheet, but not sure about the other one.

Cheers

Phil

 

Pride of Ringwood is used for bittering in the kettle for all Coopers DIY brews. Hop oils appropriate to style are added post-evaporation at the canning stage.  

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the CAMRA definition all bottle conditioned home brew is real ale. If you brew a Coopers Real Ale kit and bottle condition it, it is a Cooper Real Ale real ale. If you put it in a keg and force carbonate it, it is just a Coopers Real Ale. 😄 

Regarding the greenish taste @dosdan, are you keeping your fermentation temps 18-20C? Are pitching enough yeast? If you are using LME or DME instead of a box of Coopers Brew Enhancer, you will need more than the 7g of yeast that comes with the kit. Even a pack of Mangrove Jack's yeast may struggle if the OG is much above 1.050. 

Cheers,

Christina. 

Edited by ChristinaS1
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...