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Dry Enzyme


jackgym
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22 hours ago, Graculus said:

BUT this time he's going to use Dry Enzyme & he's already asked the question does anyone know how to calculate the FG when using the DE.

I thought he'd already made the Lager before and therefore would have an idea of where it would finish.

Yes, I've made the lager before. And yes I know where it'll finish when not using the DE. The spreadsheet tells me this - but what I'm after and I suspect there's not a definitive answer because there seems to be no access to a calculator that would determine an Estimated FG after having added the DE to the recipe above. Sorry if I've confused the issue here in any way. Of course it needs to be factored in that I'm using Dubbya (BMD) and from memory it's attenuation rate is at around 80%. Again apologies for confusing anyone. 

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5 hours ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

As far as taste, the beer was really nice.  From my perspective, I could not tell there was Dry Enzyme in it, but I do not know what Dry Enzyme tastes like.  It just tasted like beer.

Thanks Shamus. I was thinking the beer might lose body and become a little more like a mass produced beer - thinner I guess for want of a better word. 
I was thinking of using it in an Aussie lager style to get a pub like beer for someone who likes that kind of beer.

Good to hear taste wasn’t altered, I was wondering more about mouthfeel I guess.

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7 hours ago, Tone boy said:

Thanks Shamus. I was thinking the beer might lose body and become a little more like a mass produced beer - thinner I guess for want of a better word. 
I was thinking of using it in an Aussie lager style to get a pub like beer for someone who likes that kind of beer.

Good to hear taste wasn’t altered, I was wondering more about mouthfeel I guess.

My tasting notes of the brew I did are here.  Given the low head retention, the mouth feel would benefit from some Carapils.

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On 2/24/2022 at 9:06 AM, Mickep said:

I suspect there's not a definitive answer because there seems to be no access to a calculator that would determine an Estimated FG after having added the DE to the recipe above.

I think you're right as the enzyme breaks normally unfermentable sugars into something the yeast can eat so it very much depends on what is in the brew. I have a feeling the calcs would look like one of those physics blackboards covered with equations, with, at the end, "It should be approximately..." 😄

I had a couple of brews when I 1st began using the enzyme that jumped by more than 2% from the expected ABV but I only bothered tracking it for a while - most beers seem to gain at least 0.010 on the expected FG.

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On 3/2/2022 at 9:59 AM, Journeyman said:

I think you're right as the enzyme breaks normally unfermentable sugars into something the yeast can eat so it very much depends on what is in the brew. I have a feeling the calcs would look like one of those physics blackboards covered with equations, with, at the end, "It should be approximately..." 😄

I had a couple of brews when I 1st began using the enzyme that jumped by more than 2% from the expected ABV but I only bothered tracking it for a while - most beers seem to gain at least 0.010 on the expected FG.

Thanks JM, noted and I will be taking that into consideration next when I make my 6% Aussie Lager - wouldn't want it to accidentally  exceed 7% now would I. 🤣

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  • 1 month later...
On 2/9/2022 at 10:49 PM, Shamus O'Sean said:

What @Pickles Jones says seems to make sense.  The Dry Enzyme works to free up more sugars from your wort.  The Dextrose for priming should be 100% converted by the yeast in your bottles.  I would have thought your bottles would be carbed the same as usual.

I wonder if your yeast may have gone to sleep before fully fermenting out.  Maybe adding the Dextrose at priming revitalised the yeast and, as well as converting the dextrose, it converted a bit more sugar from the brew.  Maybe task a sample from one of the bottles and test it's SG.  If it is less than 1.003, I might be right.  It is a long shot though.

A bottle of the "dry enzyme" brew was sat in the beer cupboard for a while.

Eventually I decided to do as you suggested and sample the gravity.

I put this in the fermenting fridge for a day or so along with a beer I was fermenting at 20C.
Just so it would be at the correct temperature for taking a gravity reading.

As you can see it's not 1.003 any longer. That's quite a drop. Yikes!!

From memory I fermented that for 3 weeks. And it still dropped that much further after bottling.

I did have the last remaining stubby of this at the weekend. Not bad.
But the lemondrop hop was lemony enough for me.
Just a couple of long necks of the stuff left now.

DE.jpg

Edited by Graculus
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