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It's Kegging Time 2021.


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3 minutes ago, Stickers said:

IMG_8123.thumb.jpg.b06e4f01f438ff2fe1d6b0643fa9648f.jpg

v2 of the @iBooz2inspired fill line and this was so good to use. just flick the tap and watch it fill.

Good to see my idea is working well for you there Stickers. 

I never flick my Coopers taps either when opening or closing, even though the "flick close" is tempting because that's when they break.  I have 2 spare taps which sit in SP solution waiting their turn for the next brew.  The tap just used gets taken out, disassembled and cleaned and put in the SP solution and goes to the back of the tap and "O" ring queue.

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14 hours ago, ozdevil said:

this is one reason why i set and forget  and not only that, i do the carbonation through the out post  as you also want the co2 to absorb into the liquid  and then once that is done  the head space will fill with co2 to pressurise  , then when ready  switch the gas post to its rightful post connect and drink..

The way i think @stquinto is doing it  is through  the outpost  due to wanting  to do nitro 
with his setup

@stquinto my advice is like @Shamus O'Sean stated leave it on until you are ready  to switch over to nitro and pour
if you already have the equimpent  there.

 

Does it make much difference bubbling it up through the beer? I would have thought the headspace would fill up and pressurise pretty quickly, it won't all absorb into the beer before that happens. 

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6 hours ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Does it make much difference bubbling it up through the beer? I would have thought the headspace would fill up and pressurise pretty quickly, it won't all absorb into the beer before that happens. 

i dont think it makes to much of a great  difference  just making it quicker process for gas to absorb into the beer..

either method works . wether or not with the set and forget method  it gets you drinking beer any quicker  i havent really  taken much notice.   if carb from the out post or in post

i will say the kegs i have getting carbed up now , i am carbing up through the gas posts , but the previous kegs was all kegged through the out posts

 

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1 hour ago, ozdevil said:

either method works . wether or not with the set and forget method  it gets you drinking beer any quicker  i havent really  taken much notice.   if carb from the out post or in post

Bubbling from the bottom is definitely faster to carb the keg. Try the beer out method and you will hear the difference - the gas runs for a LOT longer than just pushing it in the top. Not definitive (I'll check on my next 2 kegs, do 1 via gas post and 1 via beer post) but my guess would be 3 days to carb the beer at serving instead of a week.

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I'll be interested in what you find. I doubt there's that much difference. Just because it can't be heard doesn't mean it isn't still going in on the normal in post. It's not something I'll be trying though because my disconnects aren't interchangeable between the posts and I really can't be bothered changing the lines around. Besides that I usually carbonate mine overnight on high pressure anyway. 

I've also read that bubbling gas up through the beer can scrub some hop flavour and aroma, similar to how throwing dry hops in too early doesn't get the most out of them due to the fermentation gas taking the compounds with it. Don't know how true that is though. 

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15 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

It's not something I'll be trying though because my disconnects aren't interchangeable between the posts and I really can't be bothered changing the lines around. Besides that I usually carbonate mine overnight on high pressure anyway. 

I have a line with beer disc on 1 end and gas on the other to use for daisy-chain keg cleaning - because I use duotights it's a simple matter to just remove the gas disc and plug the line into the manifold. 

I haven't noticed any issue with hops and I am pretty light on them anyway - but I'm not sure how it could be tested? Maybe a Brulosophy trial? 😄 

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3 hours ago, ozdevil said:

i dont think it makes to much of a great  difference  just making it quicker process for gas to absorb into the beer..

@Otto Von Blotto @ozdevil I have got hold of a 'hang down tube' plus diffusing stone for use with the nitro beergas...  Nitro is a 'lazy gas' as me gas expert @Red devil 44 Red advises.... and I can attest to the fact that the nitro beergas takes ages to go into solution... they say that gassing up through this diffusing stone is useful... probs a bit like your oxygen diffuser @Otto Von Blotto Kelsey?

Bubbling through the liquid post to carb up should be faster... but how much faster... and yeah as Kelsey says too maybe would scrub out some of the volatiles which are so beneficial for aroma and ultimately flavour... 

Edited by Graubart
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22 hours ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

@ozdevil and SQ, I forgot about this point. I do not know about Nitro systems. Maybe @Graubart, who I think uses it, could chime in.

Me thinks if you carbonate only with CO2, and then connect up Nitro for serving, the Nitro will not have had a chance to dissolve into the beer.  Maybe you need to carbonate with the Nitro. 

@Shamus O'Sean @ozdevil @stquinto I think I posted a great big diatribe somewhere already on this The Saint?

In summary think brief carb up followed by longer N nitro up and then nitro pour is probs best? But @stquinto the Saint's set-up is a bit diffo to mine... I have beergas N CO2 mix... whereas the Saint I think has the pure stuff?

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2 hours ago, Journeyman said:

I have a line with beer disc on 1 end and gas on the other to use for daisy-chain keg cleaning - because I use duotights it's a simple matter to just remove the gas disc and plug the line into the manifold. 

I haven't noticed any issue with hops and I am pretty light on them anyway - but I'm not sure how it could be tested? Maybe a Brulosophy trial? 😄 

Yeah I don't have any of that stuff 🤣. If you're light on hops you probably won't notice a difference, but I do like to brew reasonably Hoppy ales so whatever I can do to avoid losing their influence is a good thing. My situation is different too I suppose, I don't really need beer carbonated earlier on serving pressure because I don't use the method that often anyway. When I do it's usually a lager I'm not drinking for a while so it doesn't matter how long it takes. 

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2 hours ago, Graubart said:

I have got hold of a 'hang down tube' plus diffusing stone

I've got one of these attached to a lid with a gas post on it. I think I'm going to have to pull it apart as last time I had beer come out of the PRV or post - I think. Came to find beer on the fridge floor and it traced back to the lid but NOT the lid o-ring - that was clean.

But with a beer disc on the line to the manifold it works as good if not better.

I started using 30 psi to begin until I can't hear gas, then gas off for a few hours then 30 psi a couple more items then dial it back to 12 psi for serving pressure. Not sure about the saving in time due to the 30 psi bit but the head is certainly better than just SP - finer bubbles and longer lasting even a couple of days in.

Edited by Journeyman
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Ok, I now have my manifold and inline regs set up and all works a treat. The only annoying thing is that the regulators don't seem to have a pressure release valve, so in order to reset them, you have to disconnect the gas line on the out port. I need to drop the serving pressure a little as I get a fair bit of froth but in order to do so, I need to disconnect the gas line on all regs. That may not be a big issue, once the Kegerator is in its final place, the board with the regs and manifold is wall mounted and I have my tool to easily release duotight connectors. But for now, is there such a thing like an "inline PRV"? Like something I can put in behind the reg to release the pressure? Or can I release the pressure on the disconnect? That'd be easier and less prone to causing a gas leak than disconnecting the lines every time I need to adjust pressure down.

This kegging rabbit hole is just as deep as the one for brewing 🙂 Since I bought the Kegerator, I currently have put in my 3rd order with Kegland. Every time I think I am set, something else comes around the corner 🙂 

The good thing is, I like not bottling and just walking up to the Kegerator and pour a beer 🙂 

7D4666B9-8A6A-44A2-97C5-A5A856793FAA.thumb.jpeg.b753c52915bc0f2764df5c4f528047a7.jpeg

Edited by Aussiekraut
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4 minutes ago, Aussiekraut said:

Ok, I now have my manifold and inline regs set up and all works a treat. The only annoying thing is that the regulators don't seem to have a pressure release valve, so in order to reset them, you have to disconnect the gas line on the out port. I need to drop the serving pressure a little as I get a fair bit of froth but in order to do so, I need to disconnect the gas line on all regs. That may not be a big issue, once the Kegerator is in its final place, the board with the regs and manifold is wall mounted and I have my tool to easily release duotight connectors. But for now, is there such a thing like an "inline PRV"? Like something I can put in behind the reg to release the pressure? Or can I release the pressure on the disconnect? That'd be easier and less prone to causing a gas leak than disconnecting the lines every time I need to adjust pressure down.

This kegging rabbit hole is just as deep as the one for brewing 🙂 Since I bought the Kegerator, I currently have put in my 3rd order with Kegland. Every time I think I am set, something else comes around the corner 🙂 

The good thing is, I like not bottling and just walking up to the Kegerator and pour a beer 🙂 

7D4666B9-8A6A-44A2-97C5-A5A856793FAA.thumb.jpeg.b753c52915bc0f2764df5c4f528047a7.jpeg

I'm yet to do this as i mainly brew ipas and pale ales and the odd stout but i intend to do what youhave here

however I would try releasing the prv on the keg you want to change pressure and turning the gas handle on the manifold to off  to that keg so that you dont have to upset the other kegs

 

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24 minutes ago, ozdevil said:

I'm yet to do this as i mainly brew ipas and pale ales and the odd stout but i intend to do what youhave here

however I would try releasing the prv on the keg you want to change pressure and turning the gas handle on the manifold to off  to that keg so that you dont have to upset the other kegs

 

That did the trick, thanks. Thought of all sorts of things but not this 🙂

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Aussiekraut said:

That did the trick, thanks. Thought of all sorts of things but not this 🙂

 

 

how good are those manifolds mate  , no need for prvs in the inline regs after all lol

your becoming a kegging expert rather quickly  

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On 8/20/2021 at 12:17 AM, Shamus O'Sean said:

No dumb questions.

  • Yes, fill head space with CO2.
  • Yes, purge the O2.
  • No, Stout will not go off just sitting there (as long as keg is clean and sanitised).
  • Yes, fill to 12 psi.
  • No, do not remove the CO2 cylinder, or at least keep checking it and topping up as necessary.  If you just fill to 12 psi and then disconnect the CO2 cylinder, I think the beer will start to absorb the CO2 and the pressure in the keg will drop.  It will probably drop to a point where it will not force itself into the beer.  Many folks just set and forget.  Seven days at 12 psi and it will be ready.

@Shamus O'Sean, @ozdevil @Graubart @Otto Von Blotto cheers for all the advice fellas. @Graubart you have mentioned the nitrate in another post, I remember.

I ended up carbonating it to about 12/15 PSI last Wednesday, turned off the gas as I was out of town till Saturday, then put in a N2 bulb, shook it up a bit, and served it on Saturday evening.

I reckon the keg was under carbonated. The head didn't last much and although the beer was fine, it reminded me more of a Murphy's than a Guinness - it was missing some bitterness. Next time I'd probably do a hop tea and stick some in. I've got a recipe for Guinness that uses Target but elsewhere I've read that EKG is used.

Since I decommissioned an old fridge (I replaced it with a freezer so SWMBO was OK about it) I can go for it properly. But my SodaStream option is not scalable, I'll need to get a proper cylinder.

@Graubart - do you use the CO2/N2 blend for other beers or just for stout ? I can souce either CO2 or a blend locally, just wondered how many tanks you'd need.

Anyway, if you served one like this in Ireland you might end up wearing it 🤣

guinness_1.jpg

guinness.jpg

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13 hours ago, stquinto said:

@Graubart - do you use the CO2/N2 blend for other beers or just for stout ? I can souce either CO2 or a blend locally, just wondered how many tanks you'd need.

Yep

Beergas that I have I believe is 80:20... but also 75:25 and 55:45 N to CO2 exists ovewr here AFAIK...

And yes

a) different gas cylinder

b) different regulator

c) different tap

And yes I can use the Nitro blend to pour CO2 gassed up beers through normal taps...

But usually stick to using the gas I used to gas-on-up to pour-on-down...   : )

I do often try to run a few Nitro's though other than just Stout..  like a Caffrey's/Boddingtons or Creamy Rye... that sort of thing... to make use out of the second bottle and equipment.  (When my brewing vs consumption is working properly that is 😬)

image.thumb.png.96046ee80c7ea9b287c32d2d21561608.png

HTH

 

 

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I think they messed up the title of that Guinness recipe. The nitro one that is served everywhere is a dry stout, the extra stout is about 6.5% ABV and tastes somewhat different. 

Also I doubt a hop tea will add much in the way of bitterness, they need to be boiled for a time, half an hour or more usually to get a good amount from them. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thought I had better give this kegging time thread a bit of a bump before it is lost to the deep dark archives.

Kegged my second batch of a Coopers Sparkling Ale clone this arvo via my beer filter setup because I was so impressed with its outcome when last kegging done from the Fermzilla.  That time a very clear beer was able to be poured just 1 day after kegging so very keen to see the differences with the two Sparkling Ale kegs as I can compare with the first one done a month or so back which was not filtered.

Will post a pick of this beer when I pour a test glass tomorrow night.

Kegging via filter a Coopers Sparkling Ale Clone - resized.jpg

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On 8/24/2021 at 3:23 PM, Graubart said:

Yep

Beergas that I have I believe is 80:20... but also 75:25 and 55:45 N to CO2 exists ovewr here AFAIK...

And yes

a) different gas cylinder

b) different regulator

c) different tap

And yes I can use the Nitro blend to pour CO2 gassed up beers through normal taps...

But usually stick to using the gas I used to gas-on-up to pour-on-down...   : )

I do often try to run a few Nitro's though other than just Stout..  like a Caffrey's/Boddingtons or Creamy Rye... that sort of thing... to make use out of the second bottle and equipment.  (When my brewing vs consumption is working properly that is 😬)

image.thumb.png.96046ee80c7ea9b287c32d2d21561608.png

HTH

 

 

Oh mate that's the bomb right there, looks fantastic.

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quick cO2 regulator question.. is it normal for the high pressure in a bottle to fluctuate depending on temperature? my bottle is in a brick shed so get pretty cold at times and the low pressure sits around 550-600psi. now we've had a couple of nice days i've noticed the pressure moves up to more like 750psi later in the day.

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5 minutes ago, Stickers said:

quick cO2 regulator question.. is it normal for the high pressure in a bottle to fluctuate depending on temperature? my bottle is in a brick shed so get pretty cold at times and the low pressure sits around 550-600psi. now we've had a couple of nice days i've noticed the pressure moves up to more like 750psi later in the day.

Yep, the warmer the bottle is the more gas comes out of the liquid inside the bottle.  @Red devil 44 is the gas expert here so will call him in to confirm.

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