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RDWHAHB - What Are You Drinking in 2021?

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pale kit kilo and partial that i did with london yeast and my 2nd go at bulk priming. i'm happy with this

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ok this was from this morning before bed had about 6 gave it 8 hour go at 22 psi last night then turned back without purging to 14 psi so would have soaked up lot gas overnight. Still not happy with flavour so done the hob ball in keg. 49 grams galaxy was what left in one packet sank straight to bottom.

Will give it day or 2 and try fish it out before serve again probably not safe try to dispense with it in there freely.Get feeling the galaxy is older batch doesn't even smell as strong straight from packet out freezer as other hops.

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21 hours ago, Stickers said:

pale kit kilo and partial that i did with london yeast and my 2nd go at bulk priming. i'm happy with this

How did your gravity finish on that one @Stickers? I recently used London on an ESB and finished at 1.016 from memory. Left a bit of maltiness behind...

Looks the goods anyway. Cheers 👍🍻

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1 hour ago, jamiek86 said:

ok this was from this morning before bed had about 6 gave it 8 hour go at 22 psi last night then turned back without purging to 14 psi so would have soaked up lot gas overnight. Still not happy with flavour so done the hob ball in keg. 49 grams galaxy was what left in one packet sank straight to bottom.

Will give it day or 2 and try fish it out before serve again probably not safe try to dispense with it in there freely.Get feeling the galaxy is older batch doesn't even smell as strong straight from packet out freezer as other hops.

Jamie, I assume that is the Mr Beer North West Pale, still looks pretty much drinkable. 

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My dark ale, which is so much better than the apa.... Can't wait to try my apa/dark mix and even more so the ruby porter

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That looks like my kind of drink, nice & full of body, looks good mate. 😀

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Posted (edited)
45 minutes ago, Tone boy said:

How did your gravity finish on that one @Stickers? I recently used London on an ESB and finished at 1.016 from memory. Left a bit of maltiness behind...

Looks the goods anyway. Cheers 👍🍻

i had a bit of the CBFs that weekend and didn't do a FG reading, spreadsheet estimated 1.015 though so sounds about right.

these are the hops i threw at it too

hops.JPG.72d5adfa61338937db47cfde3a85ebdf.JPG

definitely also a lot of maltiness in the final taste. really clear as well given i only fermented for a week (but has been in bottles for 5 weeks)

Edited by Stickers
typo
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Just now, jamiek86 said:

@CLASSIC yes Mr beer and nice just needed more hop flavour 

I am doing mine in the craft FV tomorrow as my others are full however it's always to have a spare Pale hanging around. I am doing POR. Cheers.

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Posted (edited)

couldn't help myself its Mr Beer NW after hob ball of galaxy added to keg it's floating or sinking around in there freely. Poured a glass no loud noise or sounds like trying suck hop ball through. Can see very green and merky but nice and tasty.  might remove it tomorrow arvo should have done all its work by then. don't mind drinking something looks like mud water if taste good. 

brew was also cold crashed in keg so had more sediment at bottom already.

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Edited by jamiek86
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Coopers Brew A IPA side by side taste test - kit yeast versus CCA yeast.

CCA version is on the left. It definitely poured better to create that head. The kit yeast version I had to pour a bit harder to get it like that ie. less foamy.

They both taste good but there's just something about the CCA version I prefer. It seems smoother. The kit yeast version has a sharpness about it but I won't kick it out of the fridge because of it.

Bottom line: the CCA yeast is worth harvesting and improves the beer but you won't be disappointed with the kit yeast either.

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WHAT IS IT - if a lager can eg: Coopers OS Lager is not really a lager cause it uses 'ale' yeast with the kit, than what is it classed as? Does lager have a specific taste due to ingredients, or due to the length of time it takes to lager? 

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49 minutes ago, Barramullafella said:

WHAT IS IT - if a lager can eg: Coopers OS Lager is not really a lager cause it uses 'ale' yeast with the kit, than what is it classed as? Does lager have a specific taste due to ingredients, or due to the length of time it takes to lager? 

It depends on the yeast if it’s a lager yeast it’s a lager if it’s ale it’s an ale although some ale yeast when fermented cool can taste like lager but are still an ale. So it’s the yeast. The OS Lager is not a lager unless you substitute kit yeast for a proper lager yeast. Why do they do that because the beginner brewer probably doesn’t have temp control and less chance of being stuffed up eg too hot if brewed in shed around summer time. Lager when fermented correctly is a nice crisp clean beer and improves with time as it is lagered in cool conditions. Some people don’t like lagers as they can take a while to ferment although apparently fermenting lagers under pressure at a higher temperature won’t give off as many esters from the yeast and speeds up fermentation. Haven’t tried it though don’t have a spunding valve at this time.

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6 hours ago, MUZZY said:

Coopers Brew A IPA side by side taste test - kit yeast versus CCA yeast.

CCA version is on the left. It definitely poured better to create that head. The kit yeast version I had to pour a bit harder to get it like that ie. less foamy.

They both taste good but there's just something about the CCA version I prefer. It seems smoother. The kit yeast version has a sharpness about it but I won't kick it out of the fridge because of it.

Bottom line: the CCA yeast is worth harvesting and improves the beer but you won't be disappointed with the kit yeast either.

IMG_20210605_004905.jpg

They both look good to me Muzzy, I am yet to try yeast experiments other than dry pitching. Today's brew Mangrove Jack's Classic Bitter with a pack that contains 250gg Cracked Crystal, LME,  Band dried Light Malt, Dextrose, Goldings Hops.

I am going to hydrate the kit yeast before pitching to see any difference so who knows I will step up to that method also.

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8 minutes ago, RDT2 said:

It depends on the yeast if it’s a lager yeast it’s a lager if it’s ale it’s an ale although some ale yeast when fermented cool can taste like lager but are still an ale. So it’s the yeast. The OS Lager is not a lager unless you substitute kit yeast for a proper lager yeast. Why do they do that because the beginner brewer probably doesn’t have temp control and less chance of being stuffed up eg too hot if brewed in shed around summer time. Lager when fermented correctly is a nice crisp clean beer and improves with time as it is lagered in cool conditions. Some people don’t like lagers as they can take a while to ferment although apparently fermenting lagers under pressure at a higher temperature won’t give off as many esters from the yeast and speeds up fermentation. Haven’t tried it though don’t have a spunding valve at this time.

RDT2 it is interesting how to class a beer, for example I found this statement on another site----->   'Ale is not a style of beer, and nor is lager, and the defining quality is nothing more than the species of yeast used for fermentation – and beyond this, almost anything goes.' 

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1 hour ago, Barramullafella said:

WHAT IS IT - if a lager can eg: Coopers OS Lager is not really a lager cause it uses 'ale' yeast with the kit, than what is it classed as? Does lager have a specific taste due to ingredients, or due to the length of time it takes to lager? 

Lager by definition is beer brewed at cool temperatures using slow acting yeast. So I guess the answer is both, ingredients and time.

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52 minutes ago, CLASSIC said:

I am going to hydrate the kit yeast before pitching to see any difference so who knows I will step up to that method also.

I've never really understood why people hydrate dry yeast, unless of course they are trying to increase the amount of cells pitched. Isn't the yeast going to get pretty well hydrated once it's pitched in 23 litres of wort anyway?

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7 minutes ago, MUZZY said:

I've never really understood why people hydrate dry yeast, unless of course they are trying to increase the amount of cells pitched. Isn't the yeast going to get pretty well hydrated once it's pitched in 23 litres of wort anyway?

Well for what it's worth I probably would rather do that anyway as it saves more work & I have never had a problem with that method, so I am just as happy to continue with it.

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5 minutes ago, CLASSIC said:

Well for what it's worth I probably would rather do that anyway as it saves more work & I have never had a problem with that method, so I am just as happy to continue with it.

I'm hardly knowledgeable enough to say, "Don't do it." There might be genuine merit in it. I've just never understood why it's done, unless, as I mentioned, they're trying to increase cells first to avoid an underpitch. This is just my thinking but to decrease the risk of introducing something foreign to the brew I'd just pitch another sachet of kit yeast. I have quite a few surplus. Maybe those that do it don't have surplus dry yeast.

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17 minutes ago, MUZZY said:

I'm hardly knowledgeable enough to say, "Don't do it." There might be genuine merit in it. I've just never understood why it's done, unless, as I mentioned, they're trying to increase cells first to avoid an underpitch. This is just my thinking but to decrease the risk of introducing something foreign to the brew I'd just pitch another sachet of kit yeast. I have quite a few surplus. Maybe those that do it don't have surplus dry yeast.

I agree with ya Muzzy. I see it as the less contact with the wort and yeast the less chance of infection. 

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12 minutes ago, MUZZY said:

I'm hardly knowledgeable enough to say, "Don't do it." There might be genuine merit in it. I've just never understood why it's done, unless, as I mentioned, they're trying to increase cells first to avoid an underpitch. This is just my thinking but to decrease the risk of introducing something foreign to the brew I'd just pitch another sachet of kit yeast. I have quite a few surplus. Maybe those that do it don't have surplus dry yeast.

Cheek Peak Brewery have this on their website, I just thought I would give it a go but as you say I have a few packets in the fridge spare & dry pitching yeast works so whether it is a better idea or going to greatly change your brew, why make more work for yourself. The Yeast Supremes won't agree but I am willing to accept other opinions, I am thinking it would make more difference to an AG brew. 

The most consistent method to ensure your dry yeast is at its peak and ready for fermentation is by correctly rehydrating your yeast. Follow these next steps for effective rehydration…

YEAST REHYDRATION

STEP 1

PREPARE 250ml OF BOILED WATER INTO A CLEAN SANITISED JAR.

STEP 2

COVER OPENING OF JAR WITH CLING WRAP AND LEAVE TO COOL TO 35-40°C.

STEP 3

SANITISE THE OUTSIDE OF YOUR DRY YEAST PACKET. OPEN AND SPRINKLE INTO YOUR PRE-PREPARED WATER. GIVE THE JAR A LIGHT SWIRL.

STEP 4

LEAVE FOR 15 MINUTES IN A WARM AREA OUT OF DIRECT SUNLIGHT.

STEP 5

AFTER 15 MINUTES GIVE THE JAR A GOOD SWIRL AND ADD A SMALL AMOUNT OF YOUR WORT (~10-15 ml) INTO THE JAR.

STEP 6

LEAVE FOR A FURTHER 15-20 MINUTES. AFTER THIS TIME, YOUR YEAST SHOULD BE VISIBLY ACTIVE.

STEP 7

AT THIS POINT, PITCH THE ENTIRE VOLUME OF YEAST SLURRY INTO YOUR FERMENTER.

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2 hours ago, CLASSIC said:

The most consistent method to ensure your dry yeast is at its peak and ready for fermentation is by correctly rehydrating your yeast. Follow these next steps for effective rehydration…

STEP 6

LEAVE FOR A FURTHER 15-20 MINUTES. AFTER THIS TIME, YOUR YEAST SHOULD BE VISIBLY ACTIVE.

Sorry to be a kill joy guys and gals but can we continue the discussion about yeast re-hydration over on the yeast thread (where I have posted my comments) and keep this one for photos of the tasty and glorious beers (presume they are tasty). ha ha..

https://community.diybeer.com/topic/15597-yeast-thread-2021/

Cheers - AL

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I am trying a Coopers Draught with LME but I made a mistake & added Dark LME, looks  a strange for a draught but the flavour is there, this is one I dry hopped & quite frankly I reckon the brews I have done with infusion are much hoppier,  this was Goldings & I can hardly taste them. Overall it is drinkable, may improve, only bottled 13th May.

Cheers

Phil

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