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My First Coopers Lager

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I’ve just bottled my first Coopers Lager.....which is also my very first home brew. I left the wort in the FV for 7 days after FG was achieved at 1012 so a total of approx 12-13 days. Now I’ve bottled the brew with the 30 PET bottles which came with the Coopers DIY Kit. My question is, is the yeast with the Coopers Lager kit a lager or ale yeast? Just wondering if I need to keep the bottles for the next  few weeks for bottle fermentation above 18 degrees or I don’t need to control the inside temperature? Looking forward to tasting my first brew. 🍺

 

 

 

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That kit has Ale Yeast with it.

Yes you'll have to try and keep the bottles around 18 degrees or so for a couple of weeks for the yeast to do it's job.

And welcome to the world of homebrewing. A whole new world will be opening up to you.

I made this kit about 5 years ago. Even though I brewed in January and had trouble keeping it cool,
when I tried the first bottle I realised it was far better than the stuff I brewed 30 years ago.
I've now got temperature control and although I'm far from an expert I think my beer tastes great.
Most of the time that is. Had a couple of dodgy ones lately.
 

Edited by Graculus
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@Brew Bro as it is an ale yeast included the beer probably won't taste like a true lager. Keep that in mind when you first try it. A lot of newbies think they've made a dud but in fact they haven't. They've actually made an ale.

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Cheers Muzzy

nice to meet you. I like a cold lager in summer. Do you know of a good lager yeast I could try with my next Coopers Lager extract kit? Seems odd that Coppers would supply an ale yeast with their Lager kit?

 

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9 minutes ago, Brew Bro said:

Cheers Muzzy

nice to meet you. I like a cold lager in summer. Do you know of a good lager yeast I could try with my next Coopers Lager extract kit? Seems odd that Coppers would supply an ale yeast with their Lager kit?

 

Hey there Brew Bro.  Welcome aboard!

Yeah the Ale Yeasts are easier to deal with - and although it is not a true lager - it is a nice brew and your next one will be better ; )

If you can cop Ales - I would brew an Ale next - as it is easier to get closer to "the truth" that way haha...

If you are serious about Lager - then W34/70 is a great yeast that is pretty well behaved... but it is good to be able to brew cool... hard core brewers are down around 10degC in their brew fridges... I think you can get away with 15-17 degC.... you probably will need to take it up for a DiAcetyl rest around 20 for a few days and then bring it back down.... then probably good to cool it down for yeast clean up - and then go again at 15-17 for the secondary ferment in the bottle - then lager them cold for a cuppla months...  So true Lager brewing has a somewhat complex temperature regime to follow... therefore that introductory kit having an ale yeast. 

If you want to brew good beer - also consider using a tin of Coopers Liquid Malt AS WELL AS the Lager Kit... plus maybe consider tossing in a kilo of BE2 or BE3 as well....

There is good information to be had via John Palmer How to Brew book... which has an early version on the web for free...

Cheers and good brewing!

image.thumb.png.e2971a4cea91f1950bb9ddf4c88108c1.png

 

Edited by Bearded Burbler
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17 minutes ago, Brew Bro said:

Cheers Muzzy

nice to meet you. I like a cold lager in summer. Do you know of a good lager yeast I could try with my next Coopers Lager extract kit? Seems odd that Coppers would supply an ale yeast with their Lager kit?

 

Hi Brew Bro.
The consensus is Coopers include an ale yeast with the Lager kit because most new home brewers will unlikely have temperature control. Lager yeast ferments at lower temps, ale yeast is a bit more forgiving if stable temperatures are hard to achieve. Many brewers, myself included, have a fermenting fridge and thermostat controller (Inkbird) which allows us to set temps to what suits.
There are quite a few lager yeasts you can buy separately from your local home brew store or online. However that's not completely necessary. If you're prepared to spend a couple of bucks extra, the premium Coopers tins have lager yeast included with them e.g. Coopers European Lager, Thomas Cooper Gold Crown Lager. 
One other odd thing Coopers do with the complete DIY Beer kit is include a box of Brew Enhancer 1. The Lager tin label recommends it should be brewed with BE2. Go figure.

Edited by MUZZY
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30 minutes ago, Bearded Burbler said:

Hey there Brew Bro.  Welcome aboard!

Yeah the Ale Yeasts are easier to deal with - and although it is not a true lager - it is a nice brew and your next one will be better ; )

If you can cop Ales - I would brew an Ale next - as it is easier to get closer to "the truth" that way haha...

If you are serious about Lager - then W34/70 is a great yeast that is pretty well behaved... but it is good to be able to brew cool... hard core brewers are down around 10degC in their brew fridges... I think you can get away with 15-17 degC.... you probably will need to take it up for a DiAcetyl rest around 20 for a few days and then bring it back down.... then probably good to cool it down for yeast clean up - and then go again at 15-17 for the secondary ferment in the bottle - then lager them cold for a cuppla months...  So true Lager brewing has a somewhat complex temperature regime to follow... therefore that introductory kit having an ale yeast. 

If you want to brew good beer - also consider using a tin of Coopers Liquid Malt AS WELL AS the Lager Kit... plus maybe consider tossing in a kilo of BE2 or BE3 as well....

There is good information to be had via John Palmer How to Brew book... which has an early version on the web for free...

Cheers and good brewing!

image.thumb.png.e2971a4cea91f1950bb9ddf4c88108c1.png

 

Cheers mate

I’ll try the Coopers Pale Ale extract kit next, I’ve got some of the real ones in the fridge so might be fun to compare by DIY brew the commercial brew 👍

 

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16 hours ago, Bearded Burbler said:

Hey there Brew Bro.  Welcome aboard!

Yeah the Ale Yeasts are easier to deal with - and although it is not a true lager - it is a nice brew and your next one will be better ; )

If you can cop Ales - I would brew an Ale next - as it is easier to get closer to "the truth" that way haha...

If you are serious about Lager - then W34/70 is a great yeast that is pretty well behaved... but it is good to be able to brew cool... hard core brewers are down around 10degC in their brew fridges... I think you can get away with 15-17 degC.... you probably will need to take it up for a DiAcetyl rest around 20 for a few days and then bring it back down.... then probably good to cool it down for yeast clean up - and then go again at 15-17 for the secondary ferment in the bottle - then lager them cold for a cuppla months...  So true Lager brewing has a somewhat complex temperature regime to follow... therefore that introductory kit having an ale yeast. 

If you want to brew good beer - also consider using a tin of Coopers Liquid Malt AS WELL AS the Lager Kit... plus maybe consider tossing in a kilo of BE2 or BE3 as well....

There is good information to be had via John Palmer How to Brew book... which has an early version on the web for free...

Cheers and good brewing!

image.thumb.png.e2971a4cea91f1950bb9ddf4c88108c1.png

 

BB,

I have only done 4 lager brews so far -  two with S23 and two with W-34/70. Using basically the same ingredients each time bar the yeast. The W-34/70 is the winner hands down IMHO.  It ferments in half the time and the aroma and flavor of the beer in my opinion is superior to the beers which had the S23 yeast pitched in it. That's obviously just my opinion but to my mind the difference is quite distinct. I'm going to ditch the LDME on the next brew and go Liquid as well. Thanks for all the advice mate

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16 hours ago, MUZZY said:

Hi Brew Bro.
The consensus is Coopers include an ale yeast with the Lager kit because most new home brewers will unlikely have temperature control. Lager yeast ferments at lower temps, ale yeast is a bit more forgiving if stable temperatures are hard to achieve. Many brewers, myself included, have a fermenting fridge and thermostat controller (Inkbird) which allows us to set temps to what suits.
There are quite a few lager yeasts you can buy separately from your local home brew store or online. However that's not completely necessary. If you're prepared to spend a couple of bucks extra, the premium Coopers tins have lager yeast included with them e.g. Coopers European Lager, Thomas Cooper Gold Crown Lager. 
One other odd thing Coopers do with the complete DIY Beer kit is include a box of Brew Enhancer 1. The Lager tin label recommends it should be brewed with BE2. Go figure.

Hey Muzzy,

Have you had a crack at either the Coopers Euro Lager or the Thomas Cooper Gold crown? I'm looking for a new Lager to try above and beyond the OS Coopers lager I've been using. TIA

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1 hour ago, Mickep said:

BB,

I have only done 4 lager brews so far -  two with S23 and two with W-34/70. Using basically the same ingredients each time bar the yeast. The W-34/70 is the winner hands down IMHO.  It ferments in half the time and the aroma and flavor of the beer in my opinion is superior to the beers which had the S23 yeast pitched in it. That's obviously just my opinion but to my mind the difference is quite distinct. I'm going to ditch the LDME on the next brew and go Liquid as well. Thanks for all the advice mate

Welcome to the True Believers M and try a partial some time too.... I wouldn't ditch the dry for liquid but suggest - as well as - not instead of - but will have more ABV...

Luvyerwork and Good Brewing. 

BB

PS I did both Euro n GC - both were nice - and improved w a bit of cold lagering. Would suggest tho now being a crusty old all grainer - a partial w 500g of milled malted wheat in either/both - for improved mouthfeel, head, and head retention...

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19 hours ago, MUZZY said:

@Brew Bro as it is an ale yeast included the beer probably won't taste like a true lager. Keep that in mind when you first try it. A lot of newbies think they've made a dud but in fact they haven't. They've actually made an ale.

Thanks for the heads up for my first home brew

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19 hours ago, Graculus said:

That kit has Ale Yeast with it.

Yes you'll have to try and keep the bottles around 18 degrees or so for a couple of weeks for the yeast to do it's job.

And welcome to the world of homebrewing. A whole new world will be opening up to you.

I made this kit about 5 years ago. Even though I brewed in January and had trouble keeping it cool,
when I tried the first bottle I realised it was far better than the stuff I brewed 30 years ago.
I've now got temperature control and although I'm far from an expert I think my beer tastes great.
Most of the time that is. Had a couple of dodgy ones lately.
 

 

19 hours ago, MUZZY said:

Hi Brew Bro.
The consensus is Coopers include an ale yeast with the Lager kit because most new home brewers will unlikely have temperature control. Lager yeast ferments at lower temps, ale yeast is a bit more forgiving if stable temperatures are hard to achieve. Many brewers, myself included, have a fermenting fridge and thermostat controller (Inkbird) which allows us to set temps to what suits.
There are quite a few lager yeasts you can buy separately from your local home brew store or online. However that's not completely necessary. If you're prepared to spend a couple of bucks extra, the premium Coopers tins have lager yeast included with them e.g. Coopers European Lager, Thomas Cooper Gold Crown Lager. 
One other odd thing Coopers do with the complete DIY Beer kit is include a box of Brew Enhancer 1. The Lager tin label recommends it should be brewed with BE2. Go figure.

Hi, I've put all the PET bottles in a cardboard box from the Copers DIY kit covered with a towel. At night I use my heating belt over the top of the towel and partially close the top of the box, to keep the brew warm, but not to over heat, seems to be a cheap temperature control cupboard. 

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Hi, I've put all the PET bottles in a cardboard box from the Copers DIY kit covered with a towel. At night I use my heating belt over the top of the towel and partially close the top of the box, to keep the brew warm, but not to over heat, seems to be a cheap temperature control cupboard. 

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19 hours ago, Graculus said:

That kit has Ale Yeast with it.

Yes you'll have to try and keep the bottles around 18 degrees or so for a couple of weeks for the yeast to do it's job.

And welcome to the world of homebrewing. A whole new world will be opening up to you.

I made this kit about 5 years ago. Even though I brewed in January and had trouble keeping it cool,
when I tried the first bottle I realised it was far better than the stuff I brewed 30 years ago.
I've now got temperature control and although I'm far from an expert I think my beer tastes great.
Most of the time that is. Had a couple of dodgy ones lately.
 

Hi, I've put all the PET bottles in a cardboard box from the Copers DIY kit covered with a towel. At night I use my heating belt over the top of the towel and partially close the top of the box, to keep the brew warm, but not to over heat, seems to be a cheap temperature control cupboard.

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hello all I've only just got into brewing again after years absent. there used to be a spot on this web page that said what yeasts were used in tins. Coopers golden crown lager has true lager yeast? didn't notice the rotten egg smell when brewed and bottled this last month or is it a half/ half? what about TC 86 days pilsner thats my next planned brew.

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2 hours ago, Bearded Burbler said:

Welcome to the True Believers M and try a partial some time too.... I wouldn't ditch the dry for liquid but suggest - as well as - not instead of - but will have more ABV...

Luvyerwork and Good Brewing. 

BB

PS I did both Euro n GC - both were nice - and improved w a bit of cold lagering. Would suggest tho now being a crusty old all grainer - a partial w 500g of milled malted wheat in either/both - for improved mouthfeel, head, and head retention...

Thanks BB, I'll have a crack at the 500 grams of milled malted wheat, I've been using Crystal malt in the last couple and it's made a huge difference. Thanks for the heads up re: the Liquid malt too.

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20 hours ago, MUZZY said:

Hi Brew Bro.
The consensus is Coopers include an ale yeast with the Lager kit because most new home brewers will unlikely have temperature control. Lager yeast ferments at lower temps, ale yeast is a bit more forgiving if stable temperatures are hard to achieve. Many brewers, myself included, have a fermenting fridge and thermostat controller (Inkbird) which allows us to set temps to what suits.
There are quite a few lager yeasts you can buy separately from your local home brew store or online. However that's not completely necessary. If you're prepared to spend a couple of bucks extra, the premium Coopers tins have lager yeast included with them e.g. Coopers European Lager, Thomas Cooper Gold Crown Lager. 
One other odd thing Coopers do with the complete DIY Beer kit is include a box of Brew Enhancer 1. The Lager tin label recommends it should be brewed with BE2. Go figure.

hello muzzy I never noticed the rotten egg smell with golden crown lager unless lots changed in past few years since I brewed isn't this the case with lager yeast?

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45 minutes ago, Mickep said:

Thanks BB, I'll have a crack at the 500 grams of milled malted wheat, I've been using Crystal malt in the last couple and it's made a huge difference. Thanks for the heads up re: the Liquid malt too.

Ah mate you are ahead of me already - crystal malt is the biz for non-mashers as it has already been mashed in the grain by the maltster - so you only really need to steep - great stuff Mick.

Yeah have a go at mashing the 500g of milled wheat malt - 63 degrees for 40 minutes would prolly be enough... then you probably should boil it also to drop out proteins... mash probably best done in a BIAB bag from your LHBS - I use SS basket now - but had a nice big food grade nylon bag from Bris LHBS that was onlyl $25...  I do suggest you get food grade brewing bag mate... do the mash - pull out the grains then boil for 40 or an hour if you can....

However, there are other partial kings on this site that may know better @Beerlust Lusty or @BlackSands Sandman and @Shamus O'Sean Shamus might provide info on partialling.... 

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56 minutes ago, jamiek86 said:

hello all I've only just got into brewing again after years absent. there used to be a spot on this web page that said what yeasts were used in tins. Coopers golden crown lager has true lager yeast? didn't notice the rotten egg smell when brewed and bottled this last month or is it a half/ half? what about TC 86 days pilsner thats my next planned brew.

Welcome back and welcome aboard Jamie !!  ; )

I have brewed a few Lagers and Pilseners in my time - mostly cooler temps - and must say I don't always get that rotten egg smell that often - think once or twice - but normally not... mostly been using W34/70...  doing a di-acetyl rest as well... then cool back down to cleanup... 

Brewed Euro and GC and cannot remember bad smells - but cannot remember whether did with W34/70 or the tin yeast - or both... was a little while ago and have since skipped off to join the mighty ship HMAS AllGrainer ; )

@Otto Von Blotto Kelsey you brew a few nice Pilseners mate - do you get the rotten egg smell often?  I must say I have not experienced it that regularly but read and heard people talking of it...

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1 hour ago, Brew Bro said:

Hi, I've put all the PET bottles in a cardboard box from the Copers DIY kit covered with a towel. At night I use my heating belt over the top of the towel and partially close the top of the box, to keep the brew warm, but not to over heat, seems to be a cheap temperature control cupboard.

It does cost money but a lovely Inkbird temp controller does come in handy for such applications...  or other similar brands etc

image.png.be6c27158130c1503f397882c4fb2a7e.png

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1 hour ago, jamiek86 said:

hello all I've only just got into brewing again after years absent. there used to be a spot on this web page that said what yeasts were used in tins.

First post on this thread has the yeasty details..

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18 minutes ago, Bearded Burbler said:

Ah mate you are ahead of me already - crystal malt is the biz for non-mashers as it has already been mashed in the grain by the maltster - so you only really need to steep - great stuff Mick.

Yeah have a go at mashing the 500g of milled wheat malt - 63 degrees for 40 minutes would prolly be enough... then you probably should boil it also to drop out proteins... mash probably best done in a BIAB bag from your LHBS - I use SS basket now - but had a nice big food grade nylon bag from Bris LHBS that was onlyl $25...  I do suggest you get food grade brewing bag mate... do the mash - pull out the grains then boil for 40 or an hour if you can....

However, there are other partial kings on this site that may know better @Beerlust Lusty or @BlackSands Sandman and @Shamus O'Sean Shamus might provide info on partialling.... 

 
 
 

Okay BB , thanks mate. Great stuff. Got a few different size brew bags from a place called Triple J brewing. I think one of them will suffice for the boil. It says its food grade. Thanks so much for all your help. 

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12 minutes ago, Bearded Burbler said:

Welcome back and welcome aboard Jamie !!  ; )

I have brewed a few Lagers and Pilseners in my time - mostly cooler temps - and must say I don't always get that rotten egg smell that often - think once or twice - but normally not... mostly been using W34/70...  doing a di-acetyl rest as well... then cool back down to cleanup... 

Brewed Euro and GC and cannot remember bad smells - but cannot remember whether did with W34/70 or the tin yeast - or both... was a little while ago and have since skipped off to join the mighty ship HMAS AllGrainer ; )

@Otto Von Blotto Kelsey you brew a few nice Pilseners mate - do you get the rotten egg smell often?  I must say I have not experienced it that regularly but read and heard people talking of it...

thanks for your reply bearded burbler I brewed the Golden Crown at 24 degrees like suggested on tin thinking it had ale yeast I know 18 or 20 is better but I haven't got out container that add water too with iceblocks yet as not quite hot enough. so 24 is what it happened to sit on for most of time fermenting. I remember years ago I tried the euro lager and got the rotten egg smell and read upon some posts on here and PB2 was telling other people asking same question it was normal. Is PB2 still around I used to read alot on here but never had account. After 2 years absent I feel like noob again

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21 minutes ago, Stickers said:

First post on this thread has the yeasty details..

thanks so just assuming the Golden crown not listed same as pilsner will try brew it lower next time

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4 hours ago, jamiek86 said:

thanks so just assuming the Golden crown not listed same as pilsner will try brew it lower next time

Hey Jamie, the Golden Crown Lager definitely comes with a lager yeast. So brew around 12C if you can.

PS PB2 retired, gee, it must be nearly a year ago.  He was a great source of knowledge and support on the Forum.  @Coopers DIY Beer Team have taken on his role.  Not sure if the "Team" is just one person or not.  They provide a good level of support.  Look out for their posts.

Edited by Shamus O'Sean
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