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I've had a request to make a Southwark Old Stout. I dredged up an old post with a nice sounding recipe. Question is, what do I do with the roasted barley? I'm guessing it's a partial mash but what temp and for how long?

 

1.7kg OS Stout kit

1.5kg TC Amber Malt

300g Roasted Barley

1kg Dextrose

 

Made to 20 litres and fermented with a lager yeast.

 

Edit:

Now I've had a sleep on it, perhaps the OS Stout kit will produce too high a bitterness level...

 

Another option might be:

 

1.7kg OS Dark Ale beer kit

1.5kg TC Dark Malt

300g Roasted Barley

1kg Dextrose

 

made to 20 litres and fermented at 15C with a lager yeast. [biggrin]

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Looking at some of the Coopers Recipes you could just crack the roast barley and do a cold steep overnight in the fridge.  Strain off the grains and boil the liquid for 5- 10 minutes to kill any nasties.  Cool before adding to your fermenter.

To my tastes, both of your options would produce a nice beer.

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50 minutes ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

Looking at some of the Coopers Recipes you could just crack the roast barley and do a cold steep overnight in the fridge.  Strain off the grains and boil the liquid for 5- 10 minutes to kill any nasties.  Cool before adding to your fermenter.

I'd agree. I think you treat the barley as a steep - as you would any grains the Coopers recipes often use. I guess a mini mash is another term for the same thing?

I've just done a 'brown' ale with the Dark as the base, Amber malt, the resulting beer is much nearer a Porter than a Brown, quite dark and roasty. I think the barley would put the Dark into Stout territory if you're worried about bitterness.

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5 hours ago, Lab Cat said:

I guess a mini mash is another term for the same thing?

Nah, mini mash involves a malt with enzymes

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9 hours ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

Looking at some of the Coopers Recipes you could just crack the roast barley and do a cold steep overnight in the fridge.  Strain off the grains and boil the liquid for 5- 10 minutes to kill any nasties.  Cool before adding to your fermenter.

To my tastes, both of your options would produce a nice beer.

Ive gone very close to this with the dark ale I made the first time with Coopers comm yeast. Used the whole can of malt instead of half by mistake. It was very yummy....well it's all gone anyway, say no more!

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I'm thinking you have to mash the roast barley, but you sure can just steep dark chrystal malt.

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LHBS recommended either boiling water steep with cracked grains or cold water steep with cracked grains overnite

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8 hours ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

These are the Coopers recipes that use Roasted Barley

I'll just go with the Mister Sinister recipe instructions. Looks like I'm going to have to ramp up a W34/70 starter for this and a fairly large one too. I've got the harvest from my previous starter plus the split trub from the lager. Should be able to get something going from that

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Mixed up 200g dextrose in 2L and pitched the harvested yeast from the lager starter into that. it's not looking great. Is that amount of dextrose too much?

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13 minutes ago, UncleStavvy said:

Mixed up 200g dextrose in 2L and pitched the harvested yeast from the lager starter into that. it's not looking great. Is that amount of dextrose too much?

That should be fine.  It might take a while to see much activity.

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i'll bottle the stout tomorrow but wont start the new brew until the starter is ready

 

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On 7/4/2020 at 12:17 AM, Shamus O'Sean said:

These are the Coopers recipes that use Roasted Barley

The Irish Red Ale & Spirit of ANZAC recipes are older recipes in the DIY database, & only involve small amounts of roasted grain.

There has been evidence released in more recent times that cold steeping roasted grains over longer periods can reduce astringency based issues that surface in the final beer when hot steeping these types of grains. So much so that quite a few commercial breweries now separately cold steep their roasted grains away from the main mash & then combine this separately created wort with the main mash wort at the beginning of boil.

I would suggest this is why the more recent DIY recipes that involve roasted grains additions are now suggested to be cold steeped overnight. 😉

Cheers & good brewing,

Lusty.

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1 hour ago, Beerlust said:

The Irish Red Ale & Spirit of ANZAC recipes are older recipes in the DIY database, & only involve small amounts of roasted grain.

Probably more about getting a bit of colour in the brew too, rather than flavour, and or aiming for a dark beer.  Although you could get the colour from a cold steep too.

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50 minutes ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

Probably more about getting a bit of colour in the brew too, rather than flavour, and or aiming for a dark beer.  Although you could get the colour from a cold steep too.

Yes, that too. 👍

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