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pilotsh

Hey Coopers, is there a list of target temperatures for your cans?

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Dear Coopers,

All of your different base cans have instructions under the label that give a temperature range eg (21-27c), (13-15c) etc but if someone has temperature control, they could set one temperature, but you don't list it. On the forum they say 27C is no good because it would produce funky side flavours, but by listing 21-27C you are indicating that holding 21C would produce a product equally as good as 27C, but I don't think this is the case. Further, others on the forum recommend 18-20C, yet this is below your supplied range in the instructions!

Is there somewhere that you can provide the IDEAL exact target temperature for each of your cans? Maybe consider this the next time you run a label print.

Eg, Pale ale 21C, Lager 14C, Dark Ale xxC, etc.

Surly if we use Coopers products you would like to give us the best chance of getting the best results!?

Thank you in advance!

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It also says on the can to add a kilo of white sugar, it's the worst advice available really.

..No wonder homebrew has a bad reputation at times.

As for temperature control I'd suggest setting you ink bird to the lowest threshold recommend. 

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3 hours ago, pilotsh said:

Dear Coopers,

All of your different base cans have instructions under the label that give a temperature range eg (21-27c), (13-15c) etc but if someone has temperature control, they could set one temperature, but you don't list it. On the forum they say 27C is no good because it would produce funky side flavours, but by listing 21-27C you are indicating that holding 21C would produce a product equally as good as 27C, but I don't think this is the case. Further, others on the forum recommend 18-20C, yet this is below your supplied range in the instructions!

Is there somewhere that you can provide the IDEAL exact target temperature for each of your cans? Maybe consider this the next time you run a label print.

Eg, Pale ale 21C, Lager 14C, Dark Ale xxC, etc.

Surly if we use Coopers products you would like to give us the best chance of getting the best results!?

Thank you in advance!

Coopers is making things as easy for people as possible. They don't assume people have access to a temperature controlled fridge/freezer etc and the yeast they give you is presumed to make decent beer at those temperatures. Simply put, it's for Joe Bloke. You can make beer @27C but you (mostly) make better beer at lower steady temps. 

If you want a temperature range, 18C-21C will (mostly) give you the best results. Higher is ok but I'd stay below 25 if possible in order to avoid the flavours you might not want in your beer. From experience, I can say the beer is a lot better when brewed @18C, rather than 27C.

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1 hour ago, Aussiekraut said:

If you want a temperature range, 18C-21C will (mostly) give you the best results. Higher is ok but I'd stay below 25 if possible in order to avoid the flavours you might not want in your beer. From experience, I can say the beer is a lot better when brewed @18C, rather than 27C.

Which is exactly why I have reached out Directly to Coopers, as their recommendation for brew temperature is 21-27C !!🙄

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52 minutes ago, pilotsh said:

Which is exactly why I have reached out Directly to Coopers, as their recommendation for brew temperature is 21-27C !!🙄

But that's Aussiekraut's point. They're marketing to and making it easy for Joe Average.  Before I had temp control, I brewed beers at 21 and 27, and everything in between. They all came out fine, and for some brewers, that's all they want. 

Yes, temp control will get consistent results if you brew the same beer a lot, but a few brewers I know just want to make beer with as little fuss or gear as possible. They're Coopers main market, I reckon.

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It is the yeasts RANGE, meaning it will be active at those temps. I now comprehend all these forum posts re: 3rd party yeasts that target brewing temps & beer styles. K&K is also K'n'K 2F  ('Kick a Kit to Fit' sometimes)😝

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1 minute ago, JoeB7 said:

It is the yeasts RANGE, meaning it will be active at those temps. 

Yes...... so Coopers says 21-27C, yet on the forum 18-20C for best results. So you can see why a newbie would be TOTALLY confused. 🤔🧐🤓

Which is exactly the opposite of what Coopers want if a newbie is using a Coopers Can......

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Posted (edited)

I know there is at least one Coopers Employee on the forum, because they spruiked the Fruit of the Woods the day it was released.... but I may need to go straight to the brewery to get this one answered.... from the horses mouth.

If there are any Coopers staff on the Forum please save me the trouble and help many others on your own forum platform at the same time!

🙏

Edited by pilotsh

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Posted (edited)

Newbies don't want to wait ( or have the experience) so a broad ferment temp is less discouraging to first timers... it's a marketing ploy to show how a beer can be punched out quickly.

I understand what the K&K is about, and I mostly do them. Have liked partial mashing with some success, but time & space  and $$$ restricts the hobby brewer. I prefer a slow ferment because;

1) I'm lazy

2) I'm busy

3) I don't have kegs

4) I'm poor 

Edited by JoeB7
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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Ocean's of Ale- said:

It also says on the can to add a kilo of white sugar

Well then Coopers Marketing Stuffed that one up, because surely they meant to say add a box of Coopers Brew Sugar or Coopers Dextrose or Coopers Brew Enhancer 1 to it!.....🙄🤨🤔

😁😋🤦‍♂️ all at once.

Edited by pilotsh
italics

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Hi JoeB7, if 18-20 is BETTER for the ferment, why didn't Coopers list 18-27 as the temperature range?! Surely that would be even MORE forgiving for the newbies and their marketing...

 

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Posted (edited)

@Coopers DIY Beer Team - See above 

[QUOTE/]

 

Hey, wait, Shamus do you work for the Coopers Team!?

*Confused by curve ball from left field*

Edited by pilotsh

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Just now, pilotsh said:

Hey, wait, Shamus do you work for the Coopers Team!?

*Confused by curve ball from left field*

No.  But that name seems to attract the attention of who I think are Coopers Reps on the Forum.  Maybe it's a complete sham?

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HOW do you control ferment temp as a first timer??? Really? I have been told why my brew wasn't ideal because of controlling ferment temp. There's a reason why brew folks on this forum have almost IDEAL ferment fridges.

DO NOT RELY UPON CAN YEAST FOR A PERFECT BREW.

Don't complain your Hyundai doesn't drive like a Audi, until you've driven a Ferrari

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Ah, excellent, please, yes join this question. You can see how even I could be confused by their instructions as they say 21-27, and experienced brewers here say 18-21C!

I mean last night for the first time my heat belt kicked on at 19.2C like I programed it to. As 19.9C is the target temp but then the can had 21-27 at a target temperature. I can brew at any temperature down to about 19C, but I'd like to know what one temp is the target? Hope it makes sense!

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Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, JoeB7 said:

HOW do you control ferment temp as a first timer??? Really?

Easy. I have an InkBird, with a heat belt, and our apartment sits at about 18-20C (we like to save electricity by not over heating unnecessarily).

So I COULD let the FV sit at ambient and it would be 19-20. But then can instructions say maintain between 21-27. So I programmed my heat belt to turn on at 19.2C, thinking I am already stretching the Coopers instructions.

"Simple". See? 😀🤦‍♂️

Edited by pilotsh

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@pilotsh

I'm on these forums to sit at the foot of those wise, sageful brewers of old. If you buy Ikea furniture for the first time & throw the instructions away...good luck. These forums are what re-writes Ikea instructions IMHO

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5 minutes ago, pilotsh said:

Easy. I have and InkBird, with a heat belt, and our apartment sits at about 18-20C (we like to save electricity by not over heating unnecessarily).

So I COULD let the FV sit at ambient and it would be 19-20. But then can instructions say maintain between 21-27. So I programmed my heat belt to turn on at 19.2C, thinking I am already stretching the Coopers instructions.

Simple. see? 😀🤦‍♂️

Bro do the experiment 👏👏

You are one step closer to answers than I am

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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, pilotsh said:

Ah, excellent, please, yes join this question. You can see how even I could be confused by their instructions as they say 21-27, and experienced brewers here say 18-21C!

I'm afraid you're the only one confused, despite many posts clarifying it.

Coopers temp range is based on the yeasts they put in the cans. There's a mix of strains in some of these - some are mixes of lager and ale yeast. They've maximized their kit yeast for ease of use without temp control. You just have to keep the FV in that range.

Is it "Ideal" for a given beer style, as people post on here? Probably not. But it makes a half decent beer. That's the whole point of their instructions.

I've used Coopers yeast and brewed at the appropriate temp for the kit and style, and that works too. That's "ideal", but few beginner brewers are set up to do it.

Edited by Lab Cat
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Posted (edited)

So why isn't the ideal temperature within their range?

I guess I am asking Coopers to provide a specific target, for those that can achieve/aim for it. A range is fine, but also provide a specific target. And as you have just pointed out Lab Cat (thank you) the range is fine, but is it wrong of me to think the ideal would be within the range???!?? (genuine question) 🙂

When a pilot takes a plane to an airport, do you want them to land on the centerline of the runway, or one wheel just off the dirt, or just within the airport fence?

When you catch a bus, do you want it stop in front of the bus stop, or 20 meters away from the stop, or just open the door as they drive down the next street down?

When you are on a boat, do you expect them to park at the dock, or give you a life vest and swim the last 5 meters.....

Obviously with my examples I am being facetious, but it's the point I am trying to ask Coopers an answer for, with respect. They make the can, they provide the yeast. If the best temperature is 19C, why do they give 21-27C as a range? Surley, at a minimum, they would then list the range as 18-27C???

I hope I make sense. A bullseye is in the middle of a target, not a separate circle next to where you are aiming!

👍🤓

Edited by pilotsh
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@Lab Cat basic point is not hard to grasp really.

If you know what yeast you have. Control your temperature. Ale 17 - 20 is good. Lager 12 - 14. 

There's no rocket science here. Coopers aren't going to give exact temps because every beer style needs it's own temp. 

Steam beer for example. A lager brewed at ale temperatures. So on.

For basic brewing see my above temperatures as many experienced home brewers have mentioned.

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I have brewed without a temperature control fridge. It's a battle and hard work. Especially in summer.

Home brewers of all ages and experience need to control the temperature of their wort. Your beer will love you. You will love your beer. The rest will easily follow.

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46 minutes ago, pilotsh said:

So why isn't the ideal temperature within their range?

I guess I am asking Coopers to provide a specific target, for those that can achieve/aim for it. A range is fine, but also provide a specific target. And as you have just pointed out Lab Cat (thank you) the range is fine, but is it wrong of me to think the ideal would be within the range???!?? (genuine question) 🙂

When a pilot takes a plane to an airport, do you want them to land on the centerline of the runway, or one wheel just off the dirt, or just within the airport fence?

When you catch a bus, do you want it stop in front of the bus stop, or 20 meters away from the stop, or just open the door as they drive down the next street down?

When you are on a boat, do you expect them to park at the dock, or give you a life vest and swim the last 5 meters.....

Obviously with my examples I am being facetious, but it's the point I am trying to ask Coopers an answer for, with respect. They make the can, they provide the yeast. If the best temperature is 19C, why do they give 21-27C as a range? Surley, at a minimum, they would then list the range as 18-27C???

I hope I make sense. A bullseye is in the middle of a target, not a separate circle next to where you are aiming!

👍🤓

You're being silly. Home brewing is not rocket science. You already know that following Coopers cans instructions will not give you the tastiest beer. As mentioned they are designed for a beginner or someone who just wants to drink a beer they have made.

There's probably dozens of fantastic brewers here that started off with Coopers cans and a bag of sugar and now are beer artists. 

My point. Coopers cans give you a canvas. You supply the paint, brushes and hard work.

 

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1 hour ago, pilotsh said:

When you catch a bus, do you want it stop in front of the bus stop, or 20 meters away from the stop, or just open the door as they drive down the next street down?

 

As a public transport bus driver for over 20 years I'm still not sure of the answer to this. 😄 

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