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Logz1620

Cold Crash, Bottling, Carbing

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Posted (edited)

Hi guys. 
just chasing opinions from experience. 
Seeing if you guys notice any difference in carbonation levels after coldcrashing ya brew and bottling straight away whilst still cold or letting temp increase abit before bottling and putting in carb drops or priming. 
cheers

Edited by Logz1620

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I have always bottled while cold so it's a No from me. Letting it warm seems a bit odd, as you just spent all that time cooling it - as it warms it will wake up the yeast and provide you with the challenge of getting the lid on before the beer foams out the top. 😄

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I haven't crashed for a while now, but can't recall any difference. In theory, there shouldn't be one. The residual yeast still has to reach temperature before it starts bottle fermentation.  How long it takes shouldn't have any effect on the end result. Crashing, especially during winter where storage will be colder, will just make it take longer.

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Cheers guys. 
I bottle cold straight after crash and find it ok and always leave 3-4 weeks minimum in the bottle. But had recently read that some guys allow it to get warm again before bottling as they thaught it carbed better so thaught would ask. 

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1 hour ago, Lab Cat said:

I haven't crashed for a while now, but can't recall any difference. In theory, there shouldn't be one. The residual yeast still has to reach temperature before it starts bottle fermentation.  How long it takes shouldn't have any effect on the end result. Crashing, especially during winter where storage will be colder, will just make it take longer.

It's not so much the ferment that's the issue as that dropping sugar drops into the brew can cause the CO2 in solution to exit dramatically. 😄

 

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1 hour ago, Logz1620 said:

Cheers guys. 
I bottle cold straight after crash and find it ok and always leave 3-4 weeks minimum in the bottle. But had recently read that some guys allow it to get warm again before bottling as they thaught it carbed better so thaught would ask. 

@Lab Cat raises a good point about temps though. Most of the comments about secondary ferment in the bottle talk about storing the bottles at ambient temps. Unless it's in the lounge room that can be a problems in cooler months. It really needs to be up over 20° to make sure of a good carb level, for at least the first few days if not the 2 weeks.

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3 minutes ago, Journeyman said:

It's not so much the ferment that's the issue as that dropping sugar drops into the brew can cause the CO2 in solution to exit dramatically. 😄

 

I think you overestimate the properties and reaction time of beer yeast. I bottle from 'warm', usually 22C. I even did a bulk prime last time and left the beer to settle for about 45min. Never an incident yet. It remains theory until it happens.

4 minutes ago, Journeyman said:

It really needs to be up over 20° to make sure of a good carb level, for at least the first few days if not the 2 weeks.

I usually have to bring my bottles inside in the winter months. Garage is too cool and the yeast doesn't get going again for long enough. I've had beer take 3+ weeks to carb.

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2 minutes ago, Lab Cat said:

It remains theory until it happens

Try recarbing a PET bottle that didn't firm up - the 'theory' turns to example rather abruptly. 😄

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I dont see the point cold crashing and then letting it warm. Isn't putting it in the bottle and letting it warm the same thing? Anyway. If you bottle warm it will not foam. I bottle some yeasts ( mainly S04 and some saisons ) warm sometimes and never an issue. Bottling then waiting sometime and then opening it and throwing in a carb drop is a totally different thing.

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Didn't notice any difference really. In winter I'd make lagers because lager yeast can ferment at lower temperatures than ale yeast, so it doesn't need to be 18 or above for it to work. At a guess the bottles probably sat around 13-15 degrees in winter and always carbonated after 2-3 weeks.

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Posted (edited)

I bottle mine cold can’t see how it would make a difference other than the first couple of hours it takes to get to ambient temp and then it’s job on for the yeast. It’s probably quicker as it would take longer for the fermenter to cool then the smaller bottles smaller volume etc. My pilsners also had very little visible yeast/sediment in the bottom of the bottle and carbed fine. I just have to leave the bottles out for a bit otherwise the condensation from the bottle warming up causes the shelf to warp. 

Edited by RDT2

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This may answer my lack of carbonation in my cerveza, just not leaving it long enough, let’s go another week, as nice as the beer is it’s just not the same with out a nice fizz to it

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18 hours ago, Journeyman said:

dropping sugar drops into the brew can cause the CO2 in solution to exit dramatically

That's the most understated fact I've ever seen. I LOL"d

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I CC @ 4c and then bottle right away.

storing them warm during the first 2 weeks after been bottled is where the carbonation really comes from.

(especially in winter in Victoria) i keep the bottles in the boxes i got with the bottles, then keep them in the warmest rooms in the house, under a blanket. After a week, already have firm bottles. Having central heating helps!

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7 hours ago, RepSpec said:

(especially in winter in Victoria) i keep the bottles in the boxes i got with the bottles, then keep them in the warmest rooms in the house, under a blanket. After a week, already have firm bottles. Having central heating helps!

Ha. If I kept my bottles in the warmest room in the house, I would soon enough be living with them - and not the lovely wife. 

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16 hours ago, Yuley said:

Ha. If I kept my bottles in the warmest room in the house, I would soon enough be living with them - and not the lovely wife. 

I've had 3 milk crates of carbonating bottles stacked up next to the computer( covered with a towel just in case) and not a word from management. I think it helps that I've been doing the floors lately too. No woman will argue with a man while he's vacuuming🤣

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18 hours ago, Yuley said:

Ha. If I kept my bottles in the warmest room in the house, I would soon enough be living with them - and not the lovely wife. 

There’s a story of a bloke who used to be at my work where he kept them under his bed and they started detonating in the middle of the night. I don’t know if he is still married or not🤭

He was old school and retired now, I knew him but didn’t know the story till later it was typical him he loved a drink, I laughed and laughed when I heard about it🤣😂

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2 hours ago, UncleStavvy said:

No woman will argue with a man while he's vacuuming

I beg to differ...

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25 minutes ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

You must be doin' it wrong

You've not seen my wife argue.

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I vacuum once every six months.  But I do a sh1t hot job, getting into every nook and cranny.  She does it twice a week for the rest of the year.  I do not complain about the bits she misses the fifty times she does it while I don't. (Actually I do, but it is to no benefit - An argument I will not win).

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On 5/17/2020 at 3:10 PM, Journeyman said:

Try recarbing a PET bottle that didn't firm up - the 'theory' turns to example rather abruptly.

The difference is the amount of C02 in solution after a brew has fully finished fermenting is minimal. Most of my ales when I am transferring them to a keg have no signs of carbonation at all.

After the beer has attempted to be carbed in a bottle then yeah that's a whole different kettle of fish.

Mitch.

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2 hours ago, MitchellScott said:

After the beer has attempted to be carbed in a bottle then yeah that's a whole different kettle of fish

Was planning on long term storage of a stout I made months back so only carbed with one drop. Of course curiosity got too much and I cracked one open at 2 weeks and it was flat as. Attempted to add another drop to the single drop bottles......did not go well

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One drop is about right for stout - they aren't a highly carbed beer. But you do need to wait, it's a set down beer. I wouldn't go trying to get more sugar in them.

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5 hours ago, Lab Cat said:

One drop is about right for stout - they aren't a highly carbed beer. But you do need to wait, it's a set down beer. I wouldn't go trying to get more sugar in them.

Agreed.  I was really surprised at how carbonated my Russian Imperial Stout was after more than 12 months in the bottle.  I only carbonated it to half the normal level.  It was not over carbed, but not under carbed either.  Just about right really.

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