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pilotsh

"Sodium Percarbonate" vs "Sodium Percarbonate Oxyper"

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I bought 100% sodium percarbonate (definitely) and another of what I thought was also 100% sodium percarbonate, but it arrived and the label says "Sodium Percarbonate oxyper" coated with Solvay. Are they both the same? Are they both no-rinse?

One thing I've wondered is why SPC is said to be no rinse: when I use Napisan for laundry soaking up to now it is slimy as buggery and I have to wash hands for ages to stop the sliminess. How can that be no rinse!?

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Posted (edited)

Not sure pure sodium percarbonate is no rinse. 🤔 I don't have any experience with pure sodium percarbonate. Not available in my area, only online, which makes it very expensive.

Napisan is not pure sodium percarbonate.  If it is slimy, then one of the other ingredients might be sodium carbonate.

Cheers,

Christina. 

Edited by ChristinaS1

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B1: The sodium percarbonate oxyper bottle says it is no-rinse.
 

B2: The 100% sodium percabonate bottle says nothing as it is just labelled from the factory with contents 100% SPC

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I rinse both 100% sodium percarbonate and Oxy-san cleaners that have about 35% sodium percarbonate.  The 100% sodium percarbonate is easier to rinse.  The Oxy-san is slimy like Napisan and harder to get rid of.

I am not sure about this "sodium percarbonate oxyper" you mention.  It does sound like it has other ingredients.  Maybe it is much like Napisan.  If I was just using it for cleaning I would be rinsing.

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Yeah I will probably rinse. Since I clean in my bath and then my brew station, err I mean the washing machine top, is 2 meters away 🙂

 

681EA528-156C-468C-AFD2-ECB154B08E0E.png

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38 minutes ago, pilotsh said:

I will probably rinse

Especially if you sanitise with something else.

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At this stage, I just plan on using SPC, hot water (on hard plastics not PET), a microfibre cloth and my brain (ie rinsing things like bottles straight away so gunk does not dry).

Things that can handle it I will rinse off with a freshly boiled kettle. 

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The label of the Sodium Percarbonate Oyxper says it has the "properties" of sodium carbonate (aka washing soda). Not sure if some of the contents list is cut off or not, but if is actually contains sodium carbonate, it will be slimy and should be rinsed. 

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Technically it is no rinse because it only breaks down to oxygen and sodium carbonate. But it does feel slimy which is why I rinse it. I'm not too particular about how well it's rinsed, at least in fermenters. Usually just a double rinse in hot water is good enough to get rid of it. I make sure it's gone from kegs though, because the oxygen left behind could cause problems with the beer.

I also found nappy soakers a pain to rinse, but they contain about 60-70% sodium carbonate which is the reason for them creating more suds along with being extra slimy. 

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Maybe the label ran out of room for the full description,

found this on my 25kg bag.

20200414_164336.jpg

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Thanks for this. It actually calls it two different things, but I can see I won't get the Oxyper one again, as it is Sodium Carbonate, not pur Sodium Percarbonate. Good to know, thanks!

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Posted (edited)

Sodium percarbonate and sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate are just two alternative names for the same chemical. The individual grains are coated with an inert substance to avoid it going "slack" if exposed to a damp environment.

I've bought perc labelled both ways - same stuff. The supermarket products like Vanish Preen contain fillers and detergents as well and definitely need rinsing.

When perc has done its thing, what's left is just Sodium Carbonate which is old fashioned washing soda which you can buy from supermarkets. The peroxyhydrate name is there to let people know what is going on during its use - i.e. they end up with washing soda - which isn't all that clear from the basic name of percarbonate.

It could leave a salty taste in beer, I always rinse it then treat whatever vessel or utensil with phosphoric acid.
 

Edited by Bribie G
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