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karlos_1984

No fermentation

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I did a small biab on the stove last week. Cubed it for 4 days before transferring to the FV, and pitched harvested US-05 yeast. The OG was 1050.

2 days later I had zero signs of fermentation. I used a sanitised spoon and stirred in a packet of kit yeast in attempt to get something happening. Checked again this morning, still nothing. I've given the FV another swirl to try and get something happening. 

The FV is in my fermentation fridge set to 18 degrees. 

What else can I do to salvage this beer? I've never had this happen before. It's only a 10.5 litre batch but I'm not getting my hopes up.

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Not yet. Waiting for the trub to settle down after swirling it and I'll take another sample. 

The reharvested yeast had been in the fridge for a couple weeks. I posted about it on another thread. The kit yeast was prob 12 months old in the packet but it's been in the fridge the whole time.

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Yeah got to be really really careful with slurry particulary if not using it in a timely manner. Its very variable in my experience to such an extent that i dont use it anymore for ales. Ill make a starter from the slurry so i have an idea of the number of cells going in.

Lagers i still use slurry as i pitch the whole slurry. Overpitches wont affect lagers like they do ales

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Think you have covered all options to get it going.

Maybe it is still in lag phase? Leave it alone & give it a few more days & see it boots up.

Thankfully it was a 10 litre batch rather than 20 plus batch?

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A couple of weeks shouldn't be a problem for the slurry. When you take the sample, if it hasn't moved then throw the kit yeast in. No use waiting another few days, that's just giving bacteria and other crap more chance to infect it.

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What Otto said - gravity tells the story. It doesn't have to look like it's fermenting, to be fermenting.

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Well, there's no way the kit yeast would have dropped it by 18 points in half a day. That's why I suggested taking a reading before doing anything. It is odd that there weren't any visible signs, but best to check with a hydrometer first. 

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The only device which will tell you for sure that you have fermentation is the hydrometer it is king ...  Measure OG for the baseline then measure again a couple of days after pitching to see if you have action . When there is action put that sample as is with the hydrometer and measuring cylinder  in the ferment fridge and just keep checking it to monitor progress. Simples ...  

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1 hour ago, MartyG1525230263 said:

The only device which will tell you for sure that you have fermentation is the hydrometer it is king ...  Measure OG for the baseline then measure again a couple of days after pitching to see if you have action . When there is action put that sample as is with the hydrometer and measuring cylinder  in the ferment fridge and just keep checking it to monitor progress. Simples ...  

This is what I normally do.

 

Just had another thought. I wonder if my mash temp dropped too much, not converting enough sugars?

My mash temp was about 67 degrees, but when I checked it after 60 mins it'd dropped down to below 60. Could this be part of the issue perhaps?

Edited by karlos_1984
Stupid autocorrect

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Yeah well 1050 is what the hydro said. I usually add 5 points to whatever the reading is as it's out of calibration in 20 degree water.

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Would there be any benefit of raising the temp from 18 to 21 degrees then? Seems to have stalled at about 1032.

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Dunno. Hydrometer hasn't moved in 2 days. This brew is 1 of 2 in my fermentation fridge at the moment. The other one is finished and I plan on bottling it tomorrow afternoon. Once the finished brew is out of the fridge I'll raise the temp up to 21 degrees and give this dud one another stir/shake up and see if anything gets going again. It's not looking good though. Bit of a kick in the guts as it's only my 2nd AG attempt and the extra time n effort not paying off just gives ya the shits. 

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I am sorry to hear about your troubles, especially after all that hard work with your second all grain batch.

What was your pitching temp? Any chance it was below 18C? If so, that might explain the extra long lag time. If the ambient temp in the fridge was 18C, it would take several hours for the wort to hit 18C. 

US-05 has a long lag time at the best of times. Personally I have stopped using it but, if I were to, I would start it off with the temperature probe attached to the FV and set it to 20C, in an attempt to reduce the lag time, then reduce to 18C at the first signs of fermentation.

Cheers,

Christina.

Edited by ChristinaS1

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Curious.   Though your mash wasn't ideal I think as others have said 1.050 indicates good conversion and I suspect you've probably ended up with a highly fermentable wort if the mash temperature was at the low end much of the time.   BTW, what base grains were used?  If for some reason you have ended up with a somewhat unfermentable wort you could try adding alpha amylase.  A packet of the enzyme is cheap enough and I can testify that they do work, though you may end up with a drier beer than initially intended.

You initially pitched 2-week old reharvested yeast, then later a packet of kit yeast followed by yet another packet of kit yeast.  It's very hard to believe it's a yeast problem but if some reason it is, I guess you could also try adding some yeast nutrients.   

🤓

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1 hour ago, BlackSands said:

....I guess you could also try adding some yeast nutrients.   

It would be better to add some aka ghost cells, and also yeast hulls, which absorb excess fatty acids, which may be inhibiting the yeast. You can make your own by boiling a bit of yeast for a few minutes. Use whatever kind you have, whether brewer's yeast or bread  yeast. Dose is about 0.5g/L. 

Cheers,

Christina.

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