Jump to content
Aussiekraut

Ok, here's a question for the history buffs

Recommended Posts

Pretty much all the IPAs out there are made with "fruity" hops like Citra, Galaxy, Willamette, Amarillo, Centennial etc. and all taste like fruit baskets, with Citrus, Peach and Apricot being the predominant flavours. Let's reflect a little on the IPA. The India Pale Ale, brewed as an extra hoppy beer, made to last the journey from the UK to India, back in the 19th century. The preservative properties of the hops ensured the beer would still be good after potentially 6 months at sea, subjected to varying temperatures during the journey, etc.

Considering all the aforementioned hops are a product of the 20th century, what hops did they use for IPAs back in the day? What did the beers taste like? Does anybody brew IPAs the way they were brewed back in the day? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably EKG or other locally grown hops. Those IPAs aren't really hoppy like the modern American ones, they're just more bitter and heavier versions of English pale ales. At least that's my understanding of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I quite liked this one - Their website says it uses Fuggles as a nod to the original recipe.

This was a good one too.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love an English IPA. Malty and bitter, so yummy.

Quote


Recipe: Bramling IPA
Brewer: Grumpy
Style: English IPA
TYPE: All Grain

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------

Batch Size (fermenter): 21.00 L   
Estimated OG: 1.069 SG
Estimated Color: 29.8 EBC
Estimated IBU: 59.7 IBUs

Ingredients:
------------
Amt              Name                                             Type          #          %/IBU         Volume        
5.00 kg          Pale Malt, Maris Otter (5.9 EBC)                 Grain         1          82.0 %        3.26 L        
1.00 kg          Munich, Light (Joe White) (17.7 EBC)             Grain         2          16.4 %        0.65 L        
0.10 kg          Roasted Malt (Joe White) (1199.7 EBC)            Grain         3          1.6 %         0.07 L        
75.00 g          Bramling Cross [6.30 %] - Boil 60.0 min          Hop           4          45.8 IBUs     -             
3.65 g           Brewbrite (Boil 10.0 mins)                       Fining        5          -             -             
75.00 g          Bramling Cross [6.30 %] - Steep/Whirlpool  20.0  Hop           6          13.9 IBUs     -             
1.0 pkg          Liberty Bell (Mangrove Jack's #M36)              Yeast         7          -             -             

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Theere are a couple of recipes in the recipe section for the style.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah IPA these days just means is a hop forward beer or has hops in it more than your “average” beer. 

Ibreally enjoy a good modern English IPA when they are done right but I also enjoy the Americans versions too. I like variety 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Aussiekraut said:

...Considering all the aforementioned hops are a product of the 20th century, what hops did they use for IPAs back in the day? What did the beers taste like? Does anybody brew IPAs the way they were brewed back in the day? 

More likely something like Fuggle or a predecessor of it if I had to have a guess. Something quite earthy/woody I would think.

On a forum I used to frequent, a guy actually went to great lengths in an attempt to re-create what the English based workers etc. would have received in India from these boats after the long trip from England to India. He brewed an old English IPA recipe, barrelled it, & then placed it in the boot of his car for 3 months (I think? 🤔) to let it bounce around & cop all sorts of temp swings much like they would have in those days on the journey. Pretty cool I thought.

I really like British IPA's, particularly in colder months of the year when more malt presence makes for nicer drinking (I reckon). In the warmer months the more hop forward IPA's are really nice, but I still like them with some decent bitterness.

Cheers,

Lusty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Probably EKG or other locally grown hops. Those IPAs aren't really hoppy like the modern American ones, they're just more bitter and heavier versions of English pale ales. At least that's my understanding of it.

That's how I see it. The modern fruity, citrus-focussed hops of modern brewing are not those used 100+ years ago. AFAIK, the modern hop-forward style started with Sierra Nevada.

Even today, the traditional English pale or IPA is not a fruity hop beer. It's a different style altogether.They are more traditional Ales, which balance strong ABV and bitterness

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

I quite liked this one - Their website says it uses Fuggles as a nod to the original recipe.

I think I saw that one before at Dan's or somewhere. Gonna keep an eye open. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Shamus O'Sean said:

 

This one I've seen a few times as well but never picked one up.

I should for history lessons 🙂 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/14/2019 at 10:21 AM, Aussiekraut said:

Pretty much all the IPAs out there are made with "fruity" hops like Citra, Galaxy, Willamette, Amarillo, Centennial etc. and all taste like fruit baskets, with Citrus, Peach and Apricot being the predominant flavours. Let's reflect a little on the IPA. The India Pale Ale, brewed as an extra hoppy beer, made to last the journey from the UK to India, back in the 19th century. The preservative properties of the hops ensured the beer would still be good after potentially 6 months at sea, subjected to varying temperatures during the journey, etc.

Considering all the aforementioned hops are a product of the 20th century, what hops did they use for IPAs back in the day? What did the beers taste like? Does anybody brew IPAs the way they were brewed back in the day? 

I used to work for Schweppes and was told the sugar in the soft drinks was a natural preservative in them. I wonder if the sugar in beer is also, although the sugars are fermented?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really, there is obviously residual sugar that isn't fermented but it's in far lower levels than it is in soft drinks, as well as being a different type of sugar. The alcohol and hops do most of the preserving. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a hold of Mitch Steele's IPA book, it's a great read that looks at a bunch of old brewing records (amongst other resources). 

Cheers, 

John 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, MUZZY said:

I used to work for Schweppes and was told the sugar in the soft drinks was a natural preservative in them.

the natural preservation of sugar is the osmotic potential of high sugar environments ... that is why jams and syrups have no bacterial infections as the sugar content is huge and the bacterial cells are basically destroyed due to the cellular liquid leaving the cell due to osmosis ... but the high sugar environment is great for fungi, yeasts and moulds as they have sell walls which stop the degradation of the cell ... that is a very simplistic explanation but it will do ...   

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I reckon Shepherd Neame IPA is a great English IPA, bloody love it!

Pretty sure it only has 'traditional' English hops in it (EKG?)..

Get it every now and again from Dans, for research purposes.

Cheers

James

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, The Captain!! said:

+1 for Shepard Neame IPA

+1 from me too. Dans had a 3 (x  500ml) for $18 a few weeks back so I grabbed half a dozen. Still got 1 left and I'm smacking my lips just thinking about it. Very moreish beer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...