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MitchBastard

Banana-Rama

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Me Pilsner I bottled tonight has the banana thing going on. Not so much in the taste department but aroma which I guess will in turn influence the overall taste... it didn’t have this happening before cold crash... 

 I know it can decrease with ageing., yeah?

My question being..... how long generally does the banana take to mellow out. I was planning on giving this guy a decent 2 month lager so I’m in no rush to drink it just would like to know if I should expect a banana split in November when I crack em open. 

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I so wanna bag out lagers again............. please, it’s too easy.............🤪

Just another reason lagers are sh!t.🤪

sorry Mitch, couldn’t help myself. Kelsey will chime in soon enough. He loves the sh!t.

Edited by The Captain!!
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I think this is more a case of hate the player not the game.....the player didn’t aerate his wort.

 

ps don’t hate me. 

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I'm gonna channel Billy Birmingham here captain...puss off ya dopey borstard... 😂

I can't remember if I've had that banana thing in any lagers I've done, perhaps a hint of it when I check FG but it doesn't appear at all when the beer is ready to drink. Perhaps some time is all it needs? 

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The banana taste would be from the production of the ester Isoamyl Acetate.

It will fade over a long period of time. However storing the beer for a long time may also change the taste in other ways and other esters may also be produced.

Regardless of that, I have always found the taste of a beer at bottling different to when it has carbonated and also conditioned a little. Hopefully in a couple of months it isn't so pronounced.

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On 9/12/2019 at 11:04 PM, The Captain!! said:

I so wanna bag out lagers again............. please, it’s too easy.............🤪

Just another reason lagers are sh!t.🤪

I have to say that i am also in the same boat at Kelsey when it comes to lagers ... there is a certain satisfaction that comes with making a great lager that just is not there when making an ale ... lagers take time, good process and there is no-where to hide when making them as they are crisp, clean and refined ...  ales are really of little challenge throw in the hops of choice, seriously one could make a "clean the freezer ale" where all the left over hops in the freezer are used.  Select a yeast and ferment at temp ranges 18-26 and if you keg you could be drinking that ale in 7 days minimum ... lagers take time and the reward when done right is so very very satisfying. Then getting to the point where you can reproduce it at will is a credit to the brewer ...  I still use kits and bits but know when i have hit the mother load as the rewards are so so good, a rice lager clone or Beer Lao (thanks for the recipe Greeny) I made comes to mind a partial mash it was wonderful ...  I have made some ripper lagers and some not so good and you can tell. My ales are all pretty much the same the hops may vary and the base may change from bitter, real ale, APA or IPA  but they are bomb proof there is no challenge because the errors are hidden in the flavour profile .... cant hide errors in a lager they are so bloody obvious but when you make a ripper you know it . Making good lager is an art form. If I wanted to know how good a craft brewer was I would try his lager 1st that would tell you. By-pass the never ending bank of taps with  NEIPA, Saison, XIPA, Pacific ales, CCCPA and other ales with hop concoctions which assault the palate and head to the 1 lonely lager tap sitting at the end of the bank and try the lager 1st because less is more and it will tell you how much pride the brewer takes in his process.       

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I agree with you @MartyG1525230263 on a number of your points however not the point in which lagers taste any good.

However rewarding it is to brew a lager and taste the crispness and taste of that is your experience. My experience with lagers is that I may well be sensitive to some compounds brought on by lager strains of yeast that do not taste right to me. Some of these beers even make me feel quite ill. Maybe that those compounds are at a higher level in those beers I don’t know. 

I have had hop bomb lagers too that still do not cover up this taste that I get.

A good constructed ale in my opinion absolutely demolishes any lager I have ever tasted. 

I constantly taste lagers in the hope that one day I will find the one that blows my mind. However I have not found one yet. 

My comments about lagers are absolutely tongue in cheek and I mean no offence to anyone that does like drinking a bucket of turd they like to call beer. Ha ha ha. 

I am looking forward to a well earned “masked by hops” ale when I get home. It’ll be clean, dry, refreshing and flavourful. 

 

Edited by The Captain!!
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@The Captain!! you may not recall but we have chatted before about your issues with the chemistry of the lager flavour profile ... it is a shame ... I suppose your situation is in the same boat as those unfortunate souls who have hypersensitivity to capsaicin and will never experience the delights of spicy Asian foods ...  

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4 hours ago, The Captain!! said:

I agree with you @MartyG1525230263 on a number of your points however not the point in which lagers taste any good.

However rewarding it is to brew a lager and taste the crispness and taste of that is your experience. My experience with lagers is that I may well be sensitive to some compounds brought on by lager strains of yeast that do not taste right to me. Some of these beers even make me feel quite ill. Maybe that those compounds are at a higher level in those beers I don’t know. 

I have had hop bomb lagers too that still do not cover up this taste that I get.

A good constructed ale in my opinion absolutely demolishes any lager I have ever tasted. 

I constantly taste lagers in the hope that one day I will find the one that blows my mind. However I have not found one yet. 

My comments about lagers are absolutely tongue in cheek and I mean no offence to anyone that does like drinking a bucket of turd they like to call beer. Ha ha ha. 

I am looking forward to a well earned “masked by hops” ale when I get home. It’ll be clean, dry, refreshing and flavourful. 

Beers taste good or bad based on how they are constructed. It's not the yeasts' fault.

The battle with lager strains is that they are typically more malt friendly than ale strains. I've found they have a somewhat dampening effect on hops used in the boil.

The question is, how far do you want to push?

I have a brew I'm developing that is coming along nicely, but not quite there yet. Close though. The refinements from using a lager strain with this brew are noticeable & make for a very delicious experience.

When I reach the levels I'm looking for from a batch, I'll send you one Capt.

Save yourself some time & start printing those "The Captain Loves Lager" T-shirts now. 😜

Lusty.

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2 hours ago, Beerlust said:

 It's not the yeasts' fault.

But it’s the one and only explanation possible! It’s the yeast alright. 

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Just now, The Captain!! said:

But it’s the one and only explanation possible! It’s the yeast alright. 

Keep telling yourself that bud.

...and the Captain X-Files begins...

...the truth is out there!

🤣

Cheers,

Lusty.

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1 hour ago, The Captain!! said:

But it’s the one and only explanation possible! It’s the yeast alright. 

Just to be openly fair Capt, you're right. The yeast is the stumbling block because you have to fight against its natural tendencies.

As mentioned in my earlier post, lager yeast strains have some refinements that for the most part ale strains do not. I learned this from brewing pseudo-lagers with recommended ale strains. Sure they are clean, but they lack some of the malt friendly refinements of a lager strain. So my thought process from that was/is to try & develop typical liked ale traits in the lager yeast fermented space.

What do you guys think about that approach?

Cheers,

Lusty.

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