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wilfw

Kit yeast

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There used to be a sticky thread giving details of the yeast supplied in each individual Coppers kits. I can't find it now. Can anyone please enlighten me on what type of yeast is supplied with the Brew A IPA and the Family secret Amber Ale?

Or has the information been removed because it is considered a secret? ūüėģ

Edited by wilfw

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Thanks for that. The information hasn't been updated to include the new range of Thomas Cooper selection kits. It was only idle curiosity really so no great problem.

Edited by wilfw

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7 minutes ago, MitchellScott said:

Is this what you are looking for?

 

Exactly, many thanks.

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So is the Yeast which is used in theThomas Cooper Selection series marked as 'A' and described as "various ale yeasts" actually a superior yeast to that supplied in the Original Series kits marked as 'Ac' and described as Coppers ale yeast ?

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Superior?  

Just different,  nobody outside Coopers actually knows what strain it is with the different kits. 

My only issue with supplied dried yeast is quantity and how well the LHBS has stored it,  yeast is a living organism and will degrade over time depending on temp and time. 

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1 minute ago, Mark D Pirate said:

Superior?  

Just different,  nobody outside Coopers actually knows what strain it is with the different kits. 

My only issue with supplied dried yeast is quantity and how well the LHBS has stored it,  yeast is a living organism and will degrade over time depending on temp and time. 

They are yeasts that match the kits so yes maybe not superior but better than a one for all.

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No. The ones marked "A" are just third party yeasts repackaged by Coopers. Which they are is a trade secret, so you don't know what exactly you are getting. Makes it difficult to design a recipe with because you don't know the typical attenuation rate. 

Coopers ale yeast doesn't get a lot of respect but I think it is unjustified. Yeast all have their characteristics and uses. I think it is a superb yeast for kits because:

- it is flavour neutral, so is useful in a wide variety of styles.

-it is very tolerant of dry pitching, and under pitching.

- it has a short lag phase and quickly dominates a brew.

- is not overly attenuative, so it leaves a bit of mouthfeel in the high adjunct beers beginners tend to make, and in low gravity brews.

- it is more tolerant of warm fermentation temperatures (up to 25C) than most ale yeast.

On the flip side it has difficulty carbonating bottles when the ambient temperature is below 18C, but that is true of many ale yeast, with Nottingham being a notable exception. 

Cheers,

Christina.

Edited by ChristinaS1
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19 hours ago, ChristinaS1 said:

Coopers ale yeast doesn't get a lot of respect but I think it is unjustified. Yeast all have their characteristics and uses. I think it is a superb yeast for kits because:

- it is flavour neutral, so is useful in a wide variety of styles.

-it is very tolerant of dry pitching, and under pitching.

- it has a short lag phase and quickly dominates a brew.

- is not overly attenuative, so it leaves a bit of mouthfeel in the high adjunct beers beginners tend to make, and in low gravity brews.

- it is more tolerant of warm fermentation temperatures (up to 25C) than most ale yeast.

On the flip side it has difficulty carbonating bottles when the ambient temperature is below 18C, but that is true of many ale yeast, with Nottingham being a notable exception. 

+1 

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Thanks everyone for those interesting replies, food for thought indeed.

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