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Gus96

Chill method, Ok or not

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Yesterday I was a bit time poor when putting my Coopers Artisan Reserve together, so I cheated a bit and mixed up the recipe steps. While I think it shouldn't matter much I thought I would get an opinion from some of you here.

https://www.diybeer.com/au/recipe/coopers-artisan-reserve.html

While waiting for my DME to boil and adding hops, I put the remaining DME and kit into the FV stirred it up with a few litres of water. Then when my hop boil was done I strained it into the FV without chilling like the recipe calls for, then topped FV with chilled water to 23 litres. I managed to hit 18.5 degrees (recipes suggests 18 deg).

Pitched 2 x W34/70 dry and before I had finished cleaning up all the gear (less than an hour) I heard the lovely gloop gloop sound (yes, I still use an airlock).

So what I want to know is does anybody think the different chill method will affect the DME and hop boil in any adverse way. It certainly chilled it down quicker than the boil pot in the ice cold sink method.

Cheers

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Posted (edited)

I doubt it. Should be fine.

I also doubt the airlock was bubbling due to any fermentation activity. The yeast wouldn't be anywhere near getting fermentation underway less than an hour after pitching it. 

 

Edited by Otto Von Blotto
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While you may doubt that fermentation has started I could see that it had through the clear lid.

and this is how it looks 18hrs later

 

20190630_110755.jpg

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Nothing is impossible but that would be extremely unusual if it had actually started fermenting under an hour after pitching it unless it was an active starter, but it wasn't. Foam on top that early would likely be still there from when it was mixed up, or it's simply the yeast foaming a bit when it rehydrated in the wort. 

18 hours I'd expect activity so that's pretty normal.  

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21 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Nothing is impossible but that would be extremely unusual if it had actually started fermenting under an hour after pitching it unless it was an active starter, but it wasn't. Foam on top that early would likely be still there from when it was mixed up, or it's simply the yeast foaming a bit when it rehydrated in the wort. 

18 hours I'd expect activity so that's pretty normal.  

Yeah no way it starts that fast from a dry yeast.

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There was no foam on top when I pitched and I know what to look at when fermentation starts, and that activity is a kruasen forming. 

I may not have the amount of experience of some of you, only 80 odd brews but I knw what I seen. 

 

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Not in less than an hour after direct pitching dry yeast. It just doesn't happen. The yeast can create a bit of foam as it rehydrates that might look like a krausen forming but it's not krausen that early on.

The picture after 18 hours definitely is though. 

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I don't think you'll have any negative impact by straining it into the FV straight away. It was mixed in with cool water to make it up to the correct temp anyway, so there won't be any unwanted extra bitterness extracted from the hops by doing what you did. You may have lost a bit of flavour/aroma by doing so. Generally, when the pot is sat in a sink of ice/water to cool for 15-20 mins, that time will allow for more flavour and aroma to be obtained out of the hops. 

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thanks Karlos, it did steep for about 5 mins after I took it off the boil while I faffed around getting ready to pour it into the FV. time will tell I suppose.

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