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MitchBastard

Time is your friend

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It gets thrown around a bit that leaving some brews to age or what not really helps their quality. Well, yesterday I found a solitary euro lager I bottled on the 21/2/19. It was the Oktoberfest recipe (slightly modified) from the recipe section. 

Upon Initially drinking them once carbed, they tasted pretty good but there was a slight twang, the “homebrew” flair we all know and dislike, at the back of your tongue. Certainly drinkable and I plowed through 20ltrs fairly quickly. 

The lone lager, after 4 months in the bottle, was god damn fantastic and I’m quite annoyed I only had one left. Not an inkling of twang, it was crisp, clear and I could have sworn I was drinking a Heineken. 

Moral of this story for those of us on the greener side of brewing......we’ll I don’t have one but just thought I’d share. 

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Along with temp control one of the most important things for most brews. Last night I drank a Vanilla Stout that I bottled Aug 2016. Absolutely sensational.

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24 minutes ago, Cerveja said:

most important things for most brews.

I would say some. My NEIPA would not have benefitted from ageing, but my ESVA sure did.

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Yep, hop forward beers drink up. Other beers, chill. Maybe that's the mantra?

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It's definitely style dependent. They all have their optimal ageing time, and they all vary from weeks to months to years. 

On the subject of lagers, I too have noticed improvement over time stored cold. A few of them have been tapped pretty much as soon as they were kegged and they definitely improved over the month or so they lasted. 

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13 hours ago, Cerveja said:

Along with temp control one of the most important things for most brews. Last night I drank a Vanilla Stout that I bottled Aug 2016. Absolutely sensational.

Was there any vanilla left in it at all?

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15 hours ago, The Captain!! said:

Was there any vanilla left in it at all?

There was actually. Was really smooth with a great flavour. I've also got quite a bit of RIS I bottled nearly 5 years ago. Like drinking a fruit cake 🍻

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I try and put a six pack away from each batch for a later tasting just for this reason and keep notes on change / improvements.

I also found the Oktoberfest  improved after 4 to 6 months later.

Yesterday I had a couple of stubbies of a brew that I had written off as a fail 10 months ago, a definite improvement in carbonation and head retention. The back story to this was the first time using a yeast slurry and it appeared the brew failed to ferment with no krausen at all and no signs of activity hence a double pitch, left in the FV for 3 weeks then bottled it (FG 1005). After trying one every other month with a bland flat no taste experience I almost tossed it a few times. But I had space so left it and always had three in the fridge.

While it is no where near a good beer it's drinkable and it got better with age. 

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I put aside a few bottles of a porter that i brewed in May 2018.  I did enter this beer into the NSW State Homebrew comp and it scored a solid 76 out of 100 and I thought it was pretty good after 3 months in the bottle.

 

Fast forward to 12 months in the bottle and the beer is even better!  I had heard how dark beers improve over time, but this is so much richer and the different malt flavours have blended almost perfectly.  I really need to work on the schedule that the fellow brewers on here have: brew dark beers in summer to drink in winter.  Brew saisons and lagers in winter to quench the thirst in the heat of summer.  And hoppy pales/IPAs in between to drink fresh.

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4 hours ago, joolbag said:

I put aside a few bottles of a porter that i brewed in May 2018.  I did enter this beer into the NSW State Homebrew comp and it scored a solid 76 out of 100 and I thought it was pretty good after 3 months in the bottle.

 

Fast forward to 12 months in the bottle and the beer is even better!  I had heard how dark beers improve over time, but this is so much richer and the different malt flavours have blended almost perfectly.  I really need to work on the schedule that the fellow brewers on here have: brew dark beers in summer to drink in winter.  Brew saisons and lagers in winter to quench the thirst in the heat of summer.  And hoppy pales/IPAs in between to drink fresh.

Enter the beer into another comp!!

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