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On ‎6‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 10:45 PM, Lab Rat said:

But what you write isn't dot point, they're ellipses - used to signify when you omit certain words or phases from a passage you're quoting. They aren't used for general punctuation.

Dear Laboratory Rattus rattus,

I choose to disagree.

I would suggest that the innovative and unconventional utilisation of the punctuation1 marks '...' is associated with an informal and engaging style of writing inextricably linked to a 'stream of consciousness' paradigm that allows writer and reader to engage in a virtual conversation that provides both informative and amusing anecdotes while communicating scientific and practical knowledge inextricably linked to the delivery of synergistic, positive, and heavily-subscribed successful brewing community outcomes.

I remain your humble brewing servant,

Dr Burbler

____________________________

1 Truss, Lynne. Eats, shoots & leaves: The zero tolerance approach to punctuation. Penguin, 2004.

 

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Hahaha BB dunno wot u just said but impressive 😂👍🍺

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1 hour ago, Bearded Burbler said:

Dear Laboratory Rattus rattus,

I choose to disagree.

I would suggest that the innovative and unconventional utilisation of the punctuation1 marks '...' is associated with an informal and engaging style of writing inextricably linked to a 'stream of consciousness' paradigm that allows writer and reader to engage in a virtual conversation that provides both informative and amusing anecdotes while communicating scientific and practical knowledge inextricably linked to the delivery of synergistic, positive, and heavily-subscribed successful brewing community outcomes.

I remain your humble brewing servant,

Dr Burbler

____________________________

1 Truss, Lynne. Eats, shoots & leaves: The zero tolerance approach to punctuation. Penguin, 2004.

 

Very good Burbs. Of course Ms Truss never said anything of the sort. I think you've channelled Don Watson instead.

Course people think I'm being a #@%$. I should have realised that giving advice on following correct steps, getting things right, even being a bit of a pedant is totally fine if that's your thing - so long as you're talking about brewing, not words.

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1 hour ago, Lab Rat said:

Very good Burbs. Of course Ms Truss never said anything of the sort. I think you've channelled Don Watson instead.

Dearest Ratticus,

I believe you have missed the point entirely. 

I did not quote Ms Truss. 

If you look closely, I footnoted the word 'punctuation' to the Truss 2004 citation to provide an indication of my understanding of the current philological conflicts rampant in current society with the ongoing evolution of written English viewed through Ms Truss's tryste with this beautiful language. 

At this juncture, I would suggest that the time to move on is now well overdue.  

And I do subscribe to the maxim barba non facit philosophum.

Bearded Burbler

 

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Hey guys , I did a lager after my first Aussie  Pale ale that turned out awesome , my first ever Home brew , so I was super stoked... I did the lager and had to come back to the other house and totally forgot about the brew I put down , it had been in the fermenter for a total of 20 days , OG was 1038 and FG was 1010 , giving me 3.65% before bottling ... just wondering what the ideal time is for lagers to sit in the fermenter and would 20 days be ok still ? 

 

Cheers , 

Jack 

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If it's the lager that came with the brewing kit then it's actually an ale and you should bottle it now. 

Proper lagers are generally done fermentation and cleanup in a couple of weeks. At this point they're either bottled or slowly dropped down to around 3-4 degrees, either in the fermenter or another vessel. They sit at this temperature for at least a month but preferably 2-3 months, before being consumed, known as lagering. If bottled, they're allowed to carbonate before being stored cold (lagered). 

With mine, I do the slow drop in the fermenter, leave for a couple of weeks then transfer to a keg and continue lagering. 

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Sorry guys, I need to ask it one more time.....

Tomorrow will mark 7 days since I made my brew, so I am going to take a gravity reading (it has been fermenting at 18.4 degrees).  After reading this thread, I need to up it to 22 degrees and take another gravity reading.  But I am unclear as to which I do first.  Do I take the reading tomorrow, up the temperature and then take another reading in 2 days?  Or do I up the temperature before taking the first reading and then take another reading 2 days later?

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Posted (edited)
52 minutes ago, EWildcat7 said:

Sorry guys, I need to ask it one more time.....

Tomorrow will mark 7 days since I made my brew, so I am going to take a gravity reading (it has been fermenting at 18.4 degrees).  After reading this thread, I need to up it to 22 degrees and take another gravity reading.  But I am unclear as to which I do first.  Do I take the reading tomorrow, up the temperature and then take another reading in 2 days?  Or do I up the temperature before taking the first reading and then take another reading 2 days later?

Regardless of what you're planning to do with the temperature your hydrometer is your guide.   After 7 days your brew is likely at FG already. Take a reading now and then check it again over the next few days.  If the reading remains stable then it's done.  Ramping up the temperature during this time is optional - particularly for ales.  The 'clean-up' phase happens fairly quickly at ale fermentation temperatures anyway - a day or two, but some like to bump the temp up a bit during this time "just to be sure".  It's a somewhat different situation however when brewing lagers at low temperatures. 

When you're satisfied FG has been reached you then have the option of cold crashing for a while, or bottling straight away.   You may also want to consider finings to help with clarity. 

Edited by BlackSands
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just took the a gravity reading and noticed a few things:

- 1.017 - is that a little high to be  FG?  I guess I will know in 2 days when I take another sample

- I tasted it and it was bitter, just as Shamus said his was

- I let it sit for a half hour before taking the reading because of the head in the tube.  After the reading, when I dumped out the sample, there was a good amount of sediment left in the tube.  So I will definitely be cold crashing this one!

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3 hours ago, EWildcat7 said:

just took the a gravity reading and noticed a few things:- 1.017 - is that a little high to be  FG?  

I would suspect it needs to go a little longer...  what was your OG reading?

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1 hour ago, Bearded Burbler said:

I would suspect it needs to go a little longer...  what was your OG reading?

I didn't do one - I don't really care about ABV, so I didn't think OG was necessary

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1 hour ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

It's not but it can help estimate what the FG should be.

when I take another reading tomorrow, I should know whether I am ready to cold crash or have to leave it longer

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I currently have a beer on tap that finished at 1.020. Most would say it's too high, not finished etc. but given it started at 1.086 and is made up of significant amounts of specialty grains, that FG is expected. 

The FG is affected by the makeup of the wort, the OG and the yeast strain used. 

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Yep my porter that’ll be going in the FV shortly I’m expecting that thing to finish around 1.020. That’s as dry as it’ll get. 

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NEIPA has been at 1.016 three days running, will give it another day or 2 then bottle.

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4 minutes ago, ozlizard said:

NEIPA has been at 1.016 three days running, will give it another day or 2 then bottle.

What OG she start out at OzLizz?

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1.055, so should be just over 5%. Just managed to free up enough bottles by drinking my APA, things you gotta do hey?

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3 minutes ago, ozlizard said:

1.055, so should be just over 5%. Just managed to free up enough bottles by drinking my APA, things you gotta do hey?

Nice

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Posted (edited)
On 6/15/2019 at 5:17 PM, EWildcat7 said:

- 1.017 - is that a little high to be  FG?  I guess I will know in 2 days when I take another sample

1.013 today - so my reading from a few days ago was NOT the FG

and much less sediment in the sample

Edited by EWildcat7

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20 minutes ago, EWildcat7 said:

1.013 today - so my reading from a few days ago was NOT the FG

and much less sediment in the sample

How many points lower since the OG 30+ ish ?

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8 minutes ago, MartyG1525230263 said:

How many points lower since the OG 30+ ish ?

I didn't take a OG reading because I don't really care to calculate the ABV

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1 hour ago, EWildcat7 said:

I didn't take a OG reading because I don't really care to calculate the ABV

I find OG invaluable ... 1st it tells me that the wort is well mixed particularly when I do a double brew of 46L ... second I know most of my beer move around 30-34 points so the OG gives an idea what the FG will be ... OG is not necessary but very helpful  ...  

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 I only take OG readings when I deviate from my regular K & K recipes because it only varies a few points from brew to brew and they all finish around the same. I do take FG readings though to make sure its done before cold crashing.

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