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It's Kegging Time 2019

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@Bearded Burbler  I am starting to regret buying a 6L keg. It is nice for travelling, being impervious to light, but I already had bottles (green ones, not impervious to light). The little kegs are expensive.

Personally I can't see me ever needing a 9.5L keg.

Cheers,

Christina.

Edited by ChristinaS1
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I use a 10 litre keg for blending surplus of two ale batches so I don't have to faff around bottling it, but otherwise they're all 19 litre. 

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Yeah for me the attractive thing is that I don't have to muck about with any liquid lines and flooded fonts and dedicated fridges.... I just get a mini-keg that takes part of the brew - stick it into the fridge - and then don't have to worry about how long the line needs to be to ensure that the pressure is right.. I can do just yeast driven secondary ferment as @PB2 suggest... so other than a top-up of C02 as you pour my keg is already primed with fizz.... so serve straight out of the keg... as a beginner... no argument about whether I bought the right lines or not or my crimping is crrrrap… ah well maybe it is not that hard?

See I was thinking I start with this little 'picnic keg' type thing... just to have a splash into the world of kegging... and then after that maybe if that all goes well then go into the bigger deal?

I guess I am cautious... took me an age to take the big splash into doing AG 😋

Plus would be nice to pick up a keg and go off to a 'do' and rip the keg out and start pouring?!

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19 hours ago, Bearded Burbler said:

Yeah for me the attractive thing is that I don't have to muck about with any liquid lines and flooded fonts and dedicated fridges.... I just get a mini-keg that takes part of the brew - stick it into the fridge - and then don't have to worry about how long the line needs to be to ensure that the pressure is right.. I can do just yeast driven secondary ferment as @PB2 suggest... so other than a top-up of C02 as you pour my keg is already primed with fizz.... so serve straight out of the keg... as a beginner... no argument about whether I bought the right lines or not or my crimping is crrrrap… ah well maybe it is not that hard?

See I was thinking I start with this little 'picnic keg' type thing... just to have a splash into the world of kegging... and then after that maybe if that all goes well then go into the bigger deal?

I guess I am cautious... took me an age to take the big splash into doing AG 😋

Plus would be nice to pick up a keg and go off to a 'do' and rip the keg out and start pouring?!

Honestly kegging is piss easy once you have the right information.

There are quite a few calculators for you to work out your serving pressure and line length. Clamping lines with stepless clamps is nearly impossible to screw up and once its all done you don't have to worry about it again.

For me, my kegs sit at about 2C, serving pressure is 12PSI and my line length is 4.5m of 5mm ID line. Simplez 😛

Cheers, Mitch.

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I have fairly long lines as I like my beers, most of them, highly carbonated, I think about 2 1/2 meters but they could be 3, I forgot. But it all depends on the system and how you like the beer, but it is better to go longer with the lines and then you can cut them as you work out how you like the beer, but Mitchell is spot on, easy peasy.

I keep my regulator around 19-20psi and I have the flow control taps which helps reduce the foam from the high carbonation. But it is all personal preference. I have to say, nothing beats attaching some tubing and a bottling wand to the fermenter sticking it in the keg and drinking a beer.

Good conversation Mitchell and Bearded Bubbles.

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Thanks Brewers!

Appreciate the input and discussion - pure gold.

And really like the practical idea of a longer line and work your way back if need be.

I do like well carbed brew so prolly would follow the high carb pathway and flow control taps... all really really good info.

Good stuff.

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19-20psi? Are you storing them at 15 degrees? 😂

Mine sits at about 10psi since the beer is pretty much at 0. Lines are a bit over 2m long, 5mm ID. Flow control taps. The cold temp prevents too much foaming, and since I generally don't chill my glasses it does warm up a few degrees once the glass is full. Besides, I don't like warmer beer 😜

I over carbonated the last keg, although because it was just serving pressure the whole time it didn't foam everywhere when I poured it. Just excessive bubbles and head when it sat for a few minutes. I'll drop the gauge down to about 12/13psi for the next keg which should get about 10-11psi in the keg. Now I know what temperature they sit at it's easy to set the pressure right.

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1 minute ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

19-20psi? Are you storing them at 15 degrees? 😂

Haha, I actually never measured the temp in the kegerator so maybe...hahaha. nah it seems pretty cold I just like it hella carbed, what can I say.  I have done 10psi, 12 psi and always wanted more carbonation, for some beers, so I used to do 15psi but the last 3 kegs have been at 19-20psi and I like it. I might try the next batch at 15psi, again and see if I truly notice a difference or I am just wasting gas and not the free kind we all make.

Don't hate, appreciate. 🤣

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Just now, Otto Von Blotto said:

If I had mine up there the bloody beer would be as fizzy as Coke, way over the top 😂

For you Mate, for you. We all have different tastes and preferences. But as I say that, I am drinking one, I could dial back the carbonation to probably 15psi and not notice but it is nice, very nice and cold.

I used to do 15psi, so maybe I am going a little high, I will do the next batch at 15psi and if I cannot really tell I will gladly say I was over the top...But until then.....appreciate the bubbles and ignore my dirty glass.

20190930_205545.jpg

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I’ve set mine at 1 bar which is about 14 psi, personally I think my gauge is wrong or not calibrated. 

Could be something to consider 

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One thing to remember is if you have check valves in your system you'll generally lose about 2psi across them. 

So for my system I have the reg set to 14psi to achieve approx 12psi in the keg. 

Cheers. 

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I have two check valves on each line, the manifold ones of course as well as another one that sits in the line between the regulator and manifold, a remnant of my original setup of t piece connectors, but a bit of added insurance in case the manifold ones fail for some reason, although I've never had beer go back up the gas line. I dunno whether it increases the pressure drop off, but I just set it where it gives me decent enough carbonation without being too high like on that last keg. For the temperature, it's as I mentioned above.

I know everyone has their taste, but I can't enjoy beer that is too highly carbonated. The fizz and bite just dominates everything too much. But, some people scoff at my kegs being stored at 0, however it works for me. 

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9 hours ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

I have two check valves on each line, the manifold ones of course as well as another one that sits in the line between the regulator and manifold, a remnant of my original setup of t piece connectors, but a bit of added insurance in case the manifold ones fail for some reason, although I've never had beer go back up the gas line. I dunno whether it increases the pressure drop off, but I just set it where it gives me decent enough carbonation without being too high like on that last keg. For the temperature, it's as I mentioned above.

I know everyone has their taste, but I can't enjoy beer that is too highly carbonated. The fizz and bite just dominates everything too much. But, some people scoff at my kegs being stored at 0, however it works for me. 

All personal preference mate, as long as you're enjoying them that's all that matters. 

You are a big lager brewer and I also like my lagers rather cold however my ales I'd prefer a tad warmer and that's majority of what I brew so when testing a cup of water in the fridge it's generally around 2-2.5C and by the time it hits the glass it's around 4-5C.

I might also mention that lowering my fridge temps a little has solved my excess head problem when pouring which is good 🙂

Mitch. 

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Yeah, mine are about 2-4 degrees by the time the glass is full, just depends if it's a first pour or subsequent pours, size of the glass, whether or not I'm running the font fan etc. but in this climate they warm up as I drink them anyway so I still get the flavour. Last batch I found the flavour at its best about a quarter of the way into the glass down to about the last quarter when it warmed up a bit too much. 

Planning to keg the pilsner on Thursday, I'll quick carb it overnight so it's ready for Saturday. 

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I actually have no idea what temperature my fridge is or what pressure I serve my beer at. 

It’s cold and it’s at the carb level I like!!

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Posted (edited)

… now who was saying this is all so easy? 😝

I got five different people saying five different things is best....

just jarkin'...

am learning from the discussion!  Thank you... 

But I am enjoying this bottled brew with perfect carbonation right now and being able to choose whatever brew I wanted this afternoon from the range of bottles ; )

Just joshing... I would like to get to the Keg Nirvana at some stage.

Edited by Bearded Burbler
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As long as you can have a beer. The ends justify the means.

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I think it just reinforces the point that you just have to set it up in a way that gives you what you want. 

But I still think 5 litre kegs are a waste of time, especially if you only end up moving to bigger ones anyway. 😜

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7 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

I think it just reinforces the point that you just have to set it up in a way that gives you what you want. 

But I still think 5 litre kegs are a waste of time, especially if you only end up moving to bigger ones anyway. 😜

I totally agree with the first sentence. 

I have a 5L keg and it’s for camping. It’s a great size

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For those situations yes they would be good, but not for a home kegging setup. Just makes the process longer and more complicated than necessary. 

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I am going to start camping now.

10 minutes ago, Beer Baron said:

I have a 5L keg and it’s for camping. It’s a great size
 

 

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Don’t know about camping, but I got a lawn chair to put between this thread and the no-chill one 🥊🤼‍♀️

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RIGHT! 

That's it.  5L is a rubbish size.  I have been convinced. 

OK.  I am getting one of these instead then... mmm or maybe I should get 7. 

image.png.f752059093f2f465d44d45d0d3395dfe.png

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