Jump to content
Otto Von Blotto

What's in your fermenter? 2019

Recommended Posts

Hi Baron.

On 10/7/2019 at 12:42 PM, Beer Baron said:

...I used W34/70 and no matter what I do I can never get it as low as what the software predicts. It got down to 1.010 it it was meant to get to 1.006. 

Did you step mash this brew? If not, maybe give it a whirl next time as the practice is known to produce a more fermentable wort.

1.010 is a nice level I reckon anyways. It'll hold the head of the beer for longer than 1.006 will. 😉

Cheers,

Lusty.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Yeah my pilsners never really get below 1.010 but I like them that way. The one currently on tap finished at 1.012. I do a hochkurz mash, which is stepped but not a full step mash. Starts at 63, moves to 72, then mash out. The times held are largely up to the brewer. I usually use 45/25/10. I can change the length of the rest at 63 to influence the FG. Next time I might try 55 minutes to get it a little bit lower.

I use the same technique with ales but with a 70/20/10 timing and slightly higher starting temperature (66/67). I read somewhere a while ago that the rest at 72 aids in head retention and for the most part I've been happy with the results. 

Edited by Otto Von Blotto
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bottling this pale ale tomorrow once CC hits end of day 5.

4.8kg pale malt

.5kg munich

.25kg light crystal

us05

12g warrior @60

20g cascade & 10g Amarillo @30

12g cascade & 6g Amarillo @10

bout 42IBU

dry hopped with 50g centennial on day 7 for 4 days. 

First time I’ve dry hopped for for 4days only and removed the hops. Usually I dry hop on day 4 and just leave the bastards in until I bottle. Loads of flavour but compared to my previous pale, it lacks on aroma. I’d say in terms of all the beers I’ve made thus far, it certainly seems the most balanced. 

E2DF8D0B-39F4-490E-ADA9-BAB72D0B58DD.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a kit n bit on the go in the FV to test out Azacca cry hops. 

Cooper's Mexican cervesa can

1kg ldme

0.5kg wheat DME

250g light crystal

100g carapils

21 ltrs, CCA yeast.

Steeped/sparged grains at 68 degrees. 12 ltr boil with all the ldme.

Boiled for 20 mins with a 20g Azacca cryo addition at 5 mins and 50g at FO/whilpool.

I've got 50g Azacca cryo hops remaining to dry hop with. 

I've got 30g Amarillo and a heap of galaxy on hand too. Should I just use the Azacca Cryo or chuck a bit of the other 2 hops into the dry hop as well?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, karlos_1984 said:

Should I just use the Azacca Cryo or chuck a bit of the other 2 hops into the dry hop as well?

If you're evaluating Azacca I'd use it solo in the dry hop. It might feel like it's missing something without the vegetative matter, but you will get a good sense of what Azacca Cryo brings to the table. Blend it with something else if you use it again. 

Cheers, 

John 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Beerlust said:

Hi Baron.

Did you step mash this brew? If not, maybe give it a whirl next time as the practice is known to produce a more fermentable wort.

1.010 is a nice level I reckon anyways. It'll hold the head of the beer for longer than 1.006 will. 😉

Cheers,

Lusty.

I mashed at 65 for 60 then mashed out at 75 for 10. 
It doesn’t bother me too much that it didn’t drop low enough I just like to hit all of my target or thereabouts just to have the balanced beer that I was after. 

Thanks

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Greeny1525229549 said:

@Bearded Burbler

https://www.brewersfriend.com/yeast-pitch-rate-and-starter-calculator/

I use this calculator mate but plenty of others around. The rates i tend to use different rates for different yeasts based on my preferences. Belgians for example i use a 0.75 but normal pales i use 1.0. For CCA yeast i use 1.25. For a big beer ill use 1.25.

Calculators are not for everyone. Some think pitching rates don't matter all that much but my experience especially with ales and in particular belgian ales tells me it does. 

Gold thanks Greeny and thanks Kelsey @Otto Von Blotto. Good stuff. I have never done such a 'big' OG brew previously so this is good to learn. Always did just use LDME before...

I specifically did the Starter in the Wort itself as I had read about the yeast reproducing itself and generating appropriate enzymes specifically tailored to the fermentables in solution...  so thought it would be best raising my babies in the real thing... but then you guys note that maybe 1080 might be a bit much too... fair enough... for yeast health... understood.  And thanks for the calculator web address Greeny.

1080 not so for other things either... I had to laugh when you lot quoted 1080 hey 😋…  Hopefully the brew don't end up being that severe!?! 

The yeast is absolutely crrrrankin' at the moment so hopefully it all will turn out good. 

In the meantime, if you see a sign like the below, don't eat the dead animals ; )

 

image.png.45a7256d420ca3fdd9fb1dd675c05c13.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Yeah my pilsners never really get below 1.010 but I like them that way. The one currently on tap finished at 1.012. I do a hochkurz mash, which is stepped but not a full step mash. Starts at 63, moves to 72, then mash out. The times held are largely up to the brewer. I usually use 45/25/10. I can change the length of the rest at 63 to influence the FG. Next time I might try 55 minutes to get it a little bit lower.

I use the same technique with ales but with a 70/20/10 timing and slightly higher starting temperature (66/67). I read somewhere a while ago that the rest at 72 aids in head retention and for the most part I've been happy with the results.  

The ol' Hochkurz mash eh...

Mmmmm…. does sound quite "hi-brew-tech" there mixed in with the English words.... and suspect it is a great technique and no critique there... it's just the name itself auf Deutsch purely means "High-short" so it sounds a bit funny really 😋

But it all makes sense.... I guess you are mashing at a high temp for only a short period...  hence Highshort:

image.thumb.png.fde7c81cdb2fd49088a7d07c1756e5f8.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Bearded Burbler said:

The ol' Hochkurz mash eh...

Mmmmm…. does sound quite "hi-brew-tech" there mixed in with the English words.... and suspect it is a great technique and no critique there... it's just the name itself auf Deutsch purely means "High-short" so it sounds a bit funny really 😋

But it all makes sense.... I guess you are mashing at a high temp for only a short period...  hence Highshort:

image.thumb.png.fde7c81cdb2fd49088a7d07c1756e5f8.png

That's exactly what it means. I figure it must be something they invented that differed from whatever the standard mash schedule was. 

As for the yeast thing, I've read similar things but I reckon as long as the starter is all malt it's fine. It doesn't have to be grown in the same wort as the batch to perform well in it. I've also read that unhopped wort is better for yeast starters, and obviously low OG means lower ABV to mess with them. I find consistency gets consistent results, every batch is fermented with yeast grown in the same 1.037 ish wort calculated to provide me with approximately my desired pitch rate, under the same conditions other than temperature which doesn't really matter anyway. And every fermentation behaves as expected as a result. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

That's exactly what it means. I figure it must be something they invented that differed from whatever the standard mash schedule was. 

As for the yeast thing, I've read similar things but I reckon as long as the starter is all malt it's fine. It doesn't have to be grown in the same wort as the batch to perform well in it. I've also read that unhopped wort is better for yeast starters, and obviously low OG means lower ABV to mess with them. I find consistency gets consistent results, every batch is fermented with yeast grown in the same 1.037 ish wort calculated to provide me with approximately my desired pitch rate, under the same conditions other than temperature which doesn't really matter anyway. And every fermentation behaves as expected as a result. 

Gold. Sounds good. 

And the level of hopping was not severe... that time will come ; )

Maybe around Day 7 as @MitchBastard did above...  I will pound the poor old yeasties with hoppage then... hopefully most of them will have gone to sleep so they do not suffer too badly from a CCC Overdose 😆

They are certainly partying on as we speak!  The Froth-Krausen-Fest has gone up another inch since yesterdee arvo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Beer Baron said:

I mashed at 65 for 60 then mashed out at 75 for 10. 
It doesn’t bother me too much that it didn’t drop low enough I just like to hit all of my target or thereabouts just to have the balanced beer that I was after. 

Thanks

Give the step mash a go next time you brew this beer. For an AG brewer it is really good experience & your setup will easily do it. There are a few guys here on the forum that have step mashed & understand the practice in a physical sense more than I (Kelsey & Hairy come to mind) & can give you some great tips & advice on how to do it well. To do it with the same recipe specs you have for this current brew will be a great learning curve for your own knowledge moving forward. As a brewer it's a nice tool to know how to use in your bag of tricks. 😎 

It can add a little more overall time to your mash, but is worth it in many of the situations the step mash is traditionally used for. If you are the type that might like to enter a lager or pilsner beer in a competition, using this process above a standard mash regime can be the difference between winning a category & maybe getting a place.

The great part about it for you Baron is you won't need the hacksaw to make the shift for this one! 😜 🤣

Cheers & good brewing,

Lusty.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Lab Rat said:

Just bottled the Coopers Chubby Cherub.....which I'm assuming is Little Creatures Pale...and looks more like a light amber.

Perfect representation of the traditional American style.

I'm enjoying this right now from the keg. Terrific.

Cheers,

Lusty.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Beerlust said:

Perfect representation of the traditional American style.

I'm enjoying this right now from the keg. Terrific.

If you think Sierra Nevada, which LC is based on, then it makes sense. Will have to buy a bottle of both and compare. Long time since I've had either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Lab Rat said:

If you think Sierra Nevada, which LC is based on, then it makes sense. Will have to buy a bottle of both and compare. Long time since I've had either.

They are similar, but different beers. The Sierra Nevada started the trend but the style has evolved way past the initial recipe that they still hold true & continue to brew.

The LCPA & another that the DIY recipe is derived from is based on a more modern evolution of the style more commonly brewed across the USA today (IMHO).

Cheers,

Lusty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dunno about advice on doing it well, but I can certainly give you advice on how to completely eff up a step mash 😂 it's why I've never bothered with a full one since and just do what I mentioned in the earlier post. It works well with my urn and the beers turn out great. I don't really think the full step mash is necessary with today's well modified malts anyway, it was more something that was needed with less modified malts. 

I wouldn't mind trying a proper decoction mash though, just need a long handled spoon or something to scoop the grains out. It'd be interesting to compare the malt flavour; in my current recipe I use melanoidin malt to mimic the decoction flavour, but if I do a proper one I'll leave that out. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

I wouldn't mind trying a proper decoction mash though

I wouldn’t mind doing this also

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a bit different to the one I usually brew which contains magnum and Perle in the boil and gets really close. Might have to give it a go though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, porschemad911 said:

Speaking of Sierra Nevada pale ale, they recently released a home brew recipe on their blog: https://sierranevada.com/blog/pale-ale-homebrew-recipe/

No need for guesswork clone recipes now, although this one will take some tweaking for each person's setup. 

Cheers, 

John 

Great thanks. It's an AG, but I can see what Coopers were doing there, replicating the pale and caramel malts with the light and amber malt tins. I thought SN had Cascade, cascade and more cascade. Cooper CC description suggests they were going for something like a SN/Little Creatures style

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, porschemad911 said:

Speaking of Sierra Nevada pale ale, they recently released a home brew recipe on their blog: https://sierranevada.com/blog/pale-ale-homebrew-recipe/

I sampled this for the very first time just a few months ago.  Despite it's legendary status I actually thought it was quite unremarkable!  But it does look similar to some of the clone recipes I've seen.  The recipe gives the hop addition weights (leaf), and percentages for the grain but I notice it doesn't actually mention the batch size. 🤔  I assume it's the usual 23Litres.

Edited by BlackSands

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BlackSands said:

I assume it's the usual 23Litres.

Most likely 19l / 5 US gal as that seems to be the standard over there. It would definitely take a few rounds of taste, tweak and re-brew to get the end result right.

Cheers, 

John 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My current "Southern Hemi" Pale Ale using the Coopers Commercial Ale yeast is pretty much done fermenting. Current SG is 1.012. The krausen has dropped out already so I just threw the dry hop of Riwaka & Galaxy in. Currently very noticeable aromas from the yeast, so no doubting it's a Coopers yeast fermented beer. SG sample tasted of light tropical flavours, crisp, dry finish with a light spicy note from the Warrior bittering addition.

I will expect the hopping notes to become more prominent after cold crash as right now the yeast is still in suspension controlling a lot of the flavour & aroma profile. I'm interested to see how the aromatics of the Galaxy & Riwaka stand up to it.

Cheers & good brewing,

Lusty.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My "Bassstard 1080 IPA" seems to be skipping along with the USO5 Yeasty Boys seeming to be going well and the aromas smelling great... hopefully the froth and bubble indicates Yeast happiness after their severe plunge into the harsh world of high OG?

image.png.dd25940ff20c17651da9f91e85a5cc01.png

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi @Coopers DIY Beer Team and other brewers

I am doing the Coopers Vintage Ale '19 tomorrow (Saturday). There is a difference in the hop steep instructions between what is on the website and what is printed on the recipe that came in the ROTM pack.  The recipe has 1x25g Mosaic and 2x25g Cascade hops.  The website version says to add "half the Mosaic and half of one of the Cascade hops" to the hop steep.  But the printed version in the pack says " half of the Mosaic and half of the Cascade hops" to the hop steep.

Can I get some clarification:  Is it 12.5g of Cascade or 25g of Cascade in the hop steep?  It may not make a world of difference.  Either way I still think it will produce a good beer, especially because I will be temperature controlling this baby at 18°C.

Thanks Shamus

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bearded Burbler said:

My "Bassstard 1080 IPA" seems to be skipping along with the USO5 Yeasty Boys seeming to be going well and the aromas smelling great... hopefully the froth and bubble indicates Yeast happiness after their severe plunge into the harsh world of high OG?

image.png.dd25940ff20c17651da9f91e85a5cc01.png

Looks great mate. Nice krausen. Take it easy when you start drinking it 🙂

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...