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BREW DAY!! WATCHA' GOT, EH!? 2019

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RIS day again....

 

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BeerSmith 2 Recipe Printout - http://www.beersmith.com
Recipe: RIS
Brewer: Grumpy
Asst Brewer: 
Style: Imperial Stout
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (30.0) 

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Boil Size: 28.50 L
Post Boil Volume: 25.19 L
Batch Size (fermenter): 21.00 L   
Bottling Volume: 19.60 L
Estimated OG: 1.120 SG
Estimated Color: 79.3 EBC
Estimated IBU: 80.0 IBUs
Brewhouse Efficiency: 65.00 %
Est Mash Efficiency: 74.8 %


Ingredients:
------------
Amt              Name                                             Type          #          %/IBU         Volume        
5.02 g           Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) (Mash)                  Water Agent   1          -             -             
3.43 g           Calcium Chloride (Mash)                          Water Agent   2          -             -             
1.03 g           Salt (Mash)                                      Water Agent   3          -             -             
0.73 g           Chalk (Mash)                                     Water Agent   4          -             -             
0.56 g           Baking Soda (Mash)                               Water Agent   5          -             -             
5.00 kg          Pale Malt, Maris Otter (5.9 EBC)                 Grain         6          41.5 %        3.26 L        
2.00 kg          Brown Malt (128.1 EBC)                           Grain         7          16.6 %        1.30 L        
1.50 kg          Smoked Malt (Weyermann) (3.9 EBC)                Grain         8          12.4 %        0.98 L        
1.00 kg          Rye Malt (Weyermann) (5.9 EBC)                   Grain         9          8.3 %         0.65 L        
0.75 kg          Oats, Flaked (2.0 EBC)                           Grain         10         6.2 %         0.49 L        
0.20 kg          Caraaroma (Weyermann) (350.7 EBC)                Grain         11         1.7 %         0.13 L        
0.20 kg          Chocolate Rye (Weyermann) (482.6 EBC)            Grain         12         1.7 %         0.13 L        
0.20 kg          Light Crystal (45.0 EBC)                         Grain         13         1.7 %         0.13 L        
0.10 kg          Chocolate Malt (Thomas Fawcett) (1000.8 EBC)     Grain         14         0.8 %         0.07 L        
0.10 kg          Roasted Malt (Joe White) (1199.7 EBC)            Grain         15         0.8 %         0.07 L        
1.00 kg          Sugar, Table (Sucrose) [Boil] (2.0 EBC)          Sugar         16         8.3 %         0.63 L        
50.00 g          Chinook [13.20 %] - Boil 60.0 min                Hop           17         43.4 IBUs     -             
40.00 g          Super Pride [13.90 %] - Boil 60.0 min            Hop           18         36.6 IBUs     -             
1.0 pkg          Irish Ale (Wyeast Labs #1084) [124.21 ml]        Yeast         19         -             -             


Mash Schedule: BIAB, Medium Body
Total Grain Weight: 12.05 kg
----------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

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seems to be going okay. No superpride so i used some topaz i didn't know i had, i wll throw in some mosaic resin too, i have 5mL so that should push the ibus.

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Bloody hot in the garage today for brew day, 40+, put down an ag English beer garden ale, cubed and in the spare room till tomorrow 😓

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57 minutes ago, John304 said:

Bloody hot in the garage today for brew day, 40+, put down an ag English beer garden ale, cubed and in the spare room till tomorrow 😓

Tell me about it Johnno. I squibbed the mash in the shed at 40 odd, and grabbed a 15L cube of 'Extra Pale Ale Citra' from my LHBS. 

Cheers

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Brew day tomorrow, I'm calling it ANZUS pale ale. Usual APA malt bill with Vic Secret, Waimea and Rakau hops in varying amounts at 10 minutes, flameout and cube, as well as a small FWH of Cascade to get the IBU to around 39. Will ferment with 1056 at 18 degrees. Mashing around 65 to try to make it a little less chewy. Predicted OG 1.051 in 25 litres for an ABV around 5.3%. FG around 1.010. 

I'll do a dry hop and probably a small keg hop as well. Had a look at my keg kids and there is a little eyelet thing on the underside so I can hang the tea strainer balls from that. 

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7 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Brew day tomorrow, I'm calling it ANZUS pale ale. Usual APA malt bill with Vic Secret, Waimea and Rakau hops in varying amounts at 10 minutes, flameout and cube, as well as a small FWH of Cascade to get the IBU to around 39. Will ferment with 1056 at 18 degrees. Mashing around 65 to try to make it a little less chewy. Predicted OG 1.051 in 25 litres for an ABV around 5.3%. FG around 1.010. 

I'll do a dry hop and probably a small keg hop as well. Had a look at my keg kids and there is a little eyelet thing on the underside so I can hang the tea strainer balls from that. 

what size are your kegs ovb do you bottle the left overs? Sounds a good one, creative. 

Lucky for the Z or you'd be in the shit.

Edited by grogdog
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1 hour ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Brew day tomorrow, I'm calling it ANZUS pale ale. Usual APA malt bill with Vic Secret, Waimea and Rakau hops in varying amounts at 10 minutes, flameout and cube, as well as a small FWH of Cascade to get the IBU to around 39. Will ferment with 1056 at 18 degrees. Mashing around 65 to try to make it a little less chewy. Predicted OG 1.051 in 25 litres for an ABV around 5.3%. FG around 1.010. 

I'll do a dry hop and probably a small keg hop as well. Had a look at my keg kids and there is a little eyelet thing on the underside so I can hang the tea strainer balls from that. 

Quick question about mashing if I may. What difference does the mash temp have on the final product. I understand you need to mash between mid to high 60s to extract the sugars from the malt but I have seen many brewers comment on why they are mashing at a certain temp. Some say it will be more fermentable , you above state less chewy. 

In lay Mans terms , what will the final beer taste like when you mash at a certain range and the benefits of doing so 

 

cheers

 

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1 hour ago, grogdog said:

what size are your kegs ovb do you bottle the left overs? Sounds a good one, creative. 

Lucky for the Z or you'd be in the shit.

19 litres. I have a 10 litre keg that I usually use for the leftovers, blending a couple of different batches in the one keg. It's out of action at the moment though with a leaking PRV. Might just steal a 19 litre one for the meantime until I fix it.

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1 hour ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Brew day tomorrow, I'm calling it ANZUS pale ale. Usual APA malt bill with Vic Secret, Waimea and Rakau hops in varying amounts at 10 minutes, flameout and cube, as well as a small FWH of Cascade to get the IBU to around 39. Will ferment with 1056 at 18 degrees. Mashing around 65 to try to make it a little less chewy. Predicted OG 1.051 in 25 litres for an ABV around 5.3%. FG around 1.010. 

I'll do a dry hop and probably a small keg hop as well. Had a look at my keg kids and there is a little eyelet thing on the underside so I can hang the tea strainer balls from that. 

Prepare to be converted to keg hopping!!!!

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56 minutes ago, PaddyBrew2 said:

Quick question about mashing if I may. What difference does the mash temp have on the final product. I understand you need to mash between mid to high 60s to extract the sugars from the malt but I have seen many brewers comment on why they are mashing at a certain temp. Some say it will be more fermentable , you above state less chewy. 

In lay Mans terms , what will the final beer taste like when you mash at a certain range and the benefits of doing so 

 

cheers

 

Basically the lower the mash temp the lower the FG is. It does depend somewhat on what the makeup of the malt bill is, but that's the basic idea. As an example, I mashed a stout at 63-64 degrees and it still finished around 1.015, but this pale ale should be around the 1.010 mark. 

The time has a small effect on it too. Mashing at 67 degrees for 90 minutes will produce a slightly more fermentable wort than mashing it for 60 minutes would.

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1 hour ago, Greeny1525229549 said:

Prepare to be converted to keg hopping!!!!

Looking forward to seeing how it goes!

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1 hour ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

Basically the lower the mash temp the lower the FG is. It does depend somewhat on what the makeup of the malt bill is, but that's the basic idea. As an example, I mashed a stout at 63-64 degrees and it still finished around 1.015, but this pale ale should be around the 1.010 mark. 

The time has a small effect on it too. Mashing at 67 degrees for 90 minutes will produce a slightly more fermentable wort than mashing it for 60 minutes would.

 Cheers.  So if it’s a lower fg,it means a higher abv?

 

does it make any difference to the mouth feel of the beer ?

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23 minutes ago, PaddyBrew2 said:

 Cheers.  So if it’s a lower fg,it means a higher abv?

 

does it make any difference to the mouth feel of the beer ?

Not always, it depends on the OG. If you have two beers that started at the same OG and finished at different FGs, the one that finished lower will have a higher ABV. But a beer that starts at 1.045 and finishes at 1.005 will be the same ABV as one that starts at 1.050 and finishes at 1.010 because the difference between OG and FG is the same. 

Yes, generally lower FG leads to a thinner mouth feel. I find it a bit more refreshing in this kind of weather so that's why I'm mashing this one tomorrow a bit lower. The English ale I did on Monday I mashed about 64-65 as well for the same reason.

Edited by Otto Von Blotto
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On 1/16/2019 at 9:10 AM, Greeny1525229549 said:

+1. Do pretty much the same. But try to pitch around 20 then let it go from there.

@porschemad911 @Ben 10 I am reporting in on my saison that is in my brewfridge but not being temperature controlled for this experiment.

 

I reported (I think) that krausen dropped after approx two and a bit days. Gravity was 1.006 but I expect it to go lower with OG of 1.045.

 

Given bulk of fermentation is over I expected to see a drop in temp in the brew. We are in the midst of a heatwave, but still, night time lows have been about 20-22C. Well the fermenter is hovering around 29.5C, even overnight it doesn't drop below 29C. It appears this yeast is a hot one and keeps going and going and going.

 

The sample I tried on day 3 wasn't superb. I hope and suspect that Belle will clean up after itself, so will leave this a few days after it reaches FG.

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On 1/16/2019 at 7:29 PM, Titan said:

Man of many words 🤣

...to the point of riddles.

It's like, "I CBF posting anything, but I really should say something". 😜

😁

Lusty.

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On 1/16/2019 at 7:24 PM, Ben 10 said:

made that esva

Bold claim calling it "Extra Special" when you haven't even tasted it yet. 😜

Best of luck with it mate. It looked really inviting. 😎

Cheers,

Lusty.

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39 minutes ago, joolbag said:

@porschemad911 @Ben 10 I am reporting in on my saison that is in my brewfridge but not being temperature controlled for this experiment.

 

I reported (I think) that krausen dropped after approx two and a bit days. Gravity was 1.006 but I expect it to go lower with OG of 1.045.

 

Given bulk of fermentation is over I expected to see a drop in temp in the brew. We are in the midst of a heatwave, but still, night time lows have been about 20-22C. Well the fermenter is hovering around 29.5C, even overnight it doesn't drop below 29C. It appears this yeast is a hot one and keeps going and going and going.

 

The sample I tried on day 3 wasn't superb. I hope and suspect that Belle will clean up after itself, so will leave this a few days after it reaches FG.

Belle should finish around 1000 to 1002 @joolbag. Let it keep going. 

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HI Joolbag.

1 hour ago, joolbag said:

@porschemad911 @Ben 10 I am reporting in on my saison that is in my brewfridge but not being temperature controlled for this experiment.

 

I reported (I think) that krausen dropped after approx two and a bit days. Gravity was 1.006 but I expect it to go lower with OG of 1.045.

 

Given bulk of fermentation is over I expected to see a drop in temp in the brew. We are in the midst of a heatwave, but still, night time lows have been about 20-22C. Well the fermenter is hovering around 29.5C, even overnight it doesn't drop below 29C. It appears this yeast is a hot one and keeps going and going and going.

 

The sample I tried on day 3 wasn't superb. I hope and suspect that Belle will clean up after itself, so will leave this a few days after it reaches FG.

The great thing about brewing a Saison is you don't need temperature control. It is a beer that can be brewed under ambient conditions (even during our hot months here in AUS).

I admit I've not ever tracked an uncontrolled temp brew inside a brew fridge before but I can only assume it would not allow much dissipation (for a better word) of exothermic heat being generated by the yeast due to the insulation properties of the fridge. Saison yeasts produce exothermic heat in bucket loads for longer primary fermentation periods than standard yeasts due to their high attenuation. So by placing your Saison brew in a brew fridge you are effectively retaining heat as it's produced & not allowing ambient fluctuations to limit the rise in temperature being created exothermically from the yeast while it is actively fermenting.

Get your pitching temp right & then allow the brew to free-rise under ambient conditions with these beers. I always check the 7 day weather forecast before beginning the primary ferment on one of these brews as the ambient conditions will have some influence. If the weather looks like a stinker for a few days early then start your brew wort at a lower temperature prior to pitching the yeast to allow for the obvious accelerated temp rise.

Expect a bit of funk in your brew Joolbag. Funk is good though in a Saison.

tumblr_mg9y63XtrS1qh59n0o1_250.gif

Disco Stu (Bring back the funk) would be proud. 😉

A little planning ahead, be smart early, & they are one of the easiest beers to make as a home brewer (IMHO).

Cheers,

Lusty.

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