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The Captain!!

What are you growing? 2019

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I have a mate who is a Pilot & he sources stuff for me, they are;

Habenero/Carolina Reaper/Trinidad Scorpio.

Very Hot combination, have to wear gloves/face mask, but individually they aren't thot hot. But it's all good, as you know depending on the dish you only apply the heat to suit your taste.

Cheers

Phil

 

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Yep you used 2 of the hottest by themself chillies in the world in that mix. Glad to say you don't need a pilot mate to source them anymore.  

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Can you believe he is a scardy cat & doesn't like Chilli because it's too hot !!

However good bloke & I will continue to use Chilli in most of the stuff   I cook - not sure about Chilli Beer 😲 

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I'm not much of a gardener and live very close to an excellent greengrocer. However, it annoys me having to cough up $3-5 for a whole lettuce or bunch of parsley when most of the time I only require a few leaves or sprigs. So this week I filled a pot with a punnet of each in the hope I can harvest as I need it.

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Noice,I hate the organic tag and 100% Mark up organic grown gets these days. Teaching my kids to grow food and do things by themselves sure beats dominos an fortnite then wondering why they have no life skills. 

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My chooks will be happy. Stunning flower.

For your viewing pleasure to the other sunflower growers on this forum.

sunflowers.thumb.JPG.229dd81f39762847793b58c1b536a525.JPG

 

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🤗  I just love them.  In my (community) garden the cockies came down and ravaged them as usual.  In the past I have always just pulled them up after the cockies are done but this year, given that they were giving decent shade to other plants I just decapitated them instead.  And one in three responded by producing extra flowers !

 I quizzed the woman who planted them and she said it was just seed we'd collected from last years flowers and no one can really explain why lopping them has produced multiple flowers 🌻I am going to do it again though.  Helianthus Bayswateris. 

 

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1 hour ago, James of Bayswater said:

 it was just seed we'd collected from last years flowers.

My Russian Giants are yet to flower they can be seen behind the early bloomers. They are 2m plus.....

Happy to share seed so long as I can beat the cockies to them!!

The Black Cockies are ripping the pine cones from the pine trees to bits presently for seed for food. May that continue.

Let me know as no issue in posting seed to Victoria. PM me.

Cheers

 

 

Edited by YeastyBoy

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Thanks for the offer Yeasty but we have sunflower seed everywhere !

 That is why I am surprised by the multiple blooms because we have grown Russians season after season, they always grow tall, always one bloom per plant. (When I googled around it seems the Russians hybridized sunflowers to grow tall and have single flowers)  We grow them for that very reason.  They are like beacons and draw people into the garden.  

We also grow Jersualem Artichokes that are also Helianthus (tuberosa) and grow over 2 metres to produce a single daisy like flower.  But none of us has known a sunflower to produce a single bloom then reshoot multiple blooms when the original bloom is removed.   The curious thing is that this year we also planted dwarf sunflowers (which bear multiple flowers) in among the veg this year for the first time.   Cross pollination has been suggested but nah, it doesn't work like that.

The culprits....


31942250_964602707040880_214305434271691
a gaggle of corellas on the fence (new arrivals this year) and a sulphur crested cockie on the compost bin

 

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Harvest of some small figs for the first time. 

I don’t really dig figs but this type is pretty good. 

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CF530AE1-9F8B-4C2D-B11C-BEC2872EC40D.jpeg

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2 hours ago, The Captain1525230099 said:

Harvest of some small figs for the first time. 

Variety Black Genoa?

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Jam on a tree.  I love figs straight from the tree.  They do not keep well so get into them straight off the tree while you can. 

I have tomatoes everywhere.  It has been a huge season in Melbourne.   But the rodents have decimated my corn.  

They never touched it last year, this year they are rife and I see them bolting from the cornfield as I water.  I am at a loss as to what to do about them.  I don't want to poison because we have owls and while they need to lift their game in terms of rodent control I dont want them taking rodents full of poison because it will kill the owl as well.  

My next move is this:

 

rat-trap-2.jpg

 

It is a Nooski rat trap, invented in New Zealand and it does this :

rat-trap-1.jpg

See the green rubber band around its neck.  That kills it dead, chokes it to death, quickly, no escape.   They take the bait and the rubber band snaps tight on their neck.  The rat is usually found a couple of feet from the trap, no blood, no guts just shovel the little stinker in under the passion fruit and reset the trap.  

The Nooski mouse trap can be bought for $10 and the rat trap for $16 and the rubber bands are around 70 cents each.  Each trap will last indefinitely.   No danger to pets or other wildlife.  Brilliant.

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Good luck with the rat infestation James.  I'm struggling at the moment and saw a massive one bolting out of my compost bin the other day.  I was too slow with the metal rod to whack it.

 

I also don't want to use poison as it is a last resort for me.  The rats are too clever for the conventional traps, even the modernised ones that can't take your finger off.

 

I've seen the Nooski but never splashed out on it.

 

I was thinking of making a bucket trap with a rolling bottle smeared with peanut butter.  Rat climbs up ramp, hits the rolling bottle, loses footing and falls into the water to drown.

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21 minutes ago, joolbag said:

I was thinking of making a bucket trap with a rolling bottle smeared with peanut butter.  Rat climbs up ramp, hits the rolling bottle, loses footing and falls into the water to drown.

Great idea, I reckon they are clever enough to learn how to swim in that time ha ha ha

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All the reports on the Nooski have been good.  I was hoping others here might have tried them.

If I can't beat them with traps then I don't think we can plant any more corn.  Its a real shame because corn has been one of our most successful crops and every year we have a corn-fest and every year our cornfield has got bigger but this year we haven't harvested a single ear from around 40 plants.  

The thing is the rats will thrive on being corn fed.  I have to break the cycle, otherwise all I am doing is raising a crop to feed the buggers.

My original plan was to replace the corn with a broad bean forest over winter to replenish the ground.  Broad beans are delicious and they are also excellent green manure - and rat habitat 😠

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I use a Rat Zapper at home. It's battery powered and electrocutes them when they walk into it to get the bait - usually a couple of dog biscuits. 

It's good. No mess, no poison and I can chuck the dead rat out for the kookaburras or other birds to eat without worrying about harming them.

Nooski sounds like a good deal too though.

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Thanks Popo.  The Zapper would do the trick.  

The only trouble is that its a community garden and we have a limited budget.  $75 is a reasonable price for the Zapper but I reckon the Treasurer will go with the cheaper option.  

Being a public space  the Zapper is the sort of thing that is likely to get knocked off.  So might the Nooski I suppose but it is cheaper to replace.

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Nooski night one in compost bin. Untouched. I guess there is too much food in the compost bin that is more attractive and accessible than crawling into a tube for dog biscuits. Have moved it outside the bin and added peanut butter for extra attractant

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I was hoping you’d get one too joolbag. Sounds like a ripper of an idea.

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I agree Joolbag.  The compost maybe too much of a smorgasbord.  Please keep us posted.  The Nooski reads like a good idea but there is nothing like a live trial.

I raised the idea of deploying a couple of Nooskis in the garden and my volunteers all pull faces at me.  Everyone's a Buddhist these days.  They are rats for godsake.   If worst comes to worst I am going to plant a patch of catnip around the cornfield and see what happens.   Mind you cats are barely  ahead of rats on my black list but at least they don't eat my corn.

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7 minutes ago, The Captain!! said:

Grew some rosella this year.

made some Jam today. 

You should of saved some for Benny's Rosella Saison recipe. A beautiful looking beer with the hue from those hibiscus flowers. 😎

Nice job on the jam though. 👍

Cheers,

Lusty.

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11 minutes ago, Beerlust said:

You should of saved some for Benny's Rosella Saison recipe. A beautiful looking beer with the hue from those hibiscus flowers. 😎

Nice job on the jam though. 👍

Cheers,

Lusty.

Oh petal............ I have only used about half the amount on the actual flowers that are on the bushes.

Im actually thinking of a brut rather than a saison, as id like to give some away, and most of my mates don't really like saison. 

Not real sure about hops with this though. I was thinking nelson and something else. Any suggestions?

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4 minutes ago, The Captain!! said:

...Im actually thinking of a brut rather than a saison, as id like to give some away, and most of my mates don't really like saison. 

Not real sure about hops with this though. I was thinking nelson and something else. Any suggestions?

Brut/Saison, almost the same thing to me. Brut is just a trendier name atm using a similar french yeast strain with high attenuation.

The colour in Benny's Saison was the feature to me. Really beautiful & not like anything I had seen before. Certainly not a hue I think could be created with any grain I know of.

The only thing I said the beer could have done with was an aroma to match the beautiful colour he had created. 

ufEB5Vc.jpg

Look at the gorgeous colour of Benny's Rosella Saison. Quite outstanding. What would you want the aroma of it to be?

Cheers,

Lusty.

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