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Worthog

Citra Pale Ale Midstrength AG

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This AG Midstrength Pale Ale is the pick of my summer brews and will be on the xmas table for lunch.

Batch 67: Citra PA Mid

  • 21L
  • 3.6kg Maris Otter
  • 400gCarapils
  • 15g Simcoe@FWH
  • 20g Cascade@17m
  • 25g Citra@FO
  • 11g US-05 rehydrated
  • 25g Citra Dry Hop (3 days)
  • OG: 1.032
  • FG: 1.007
  • 3.7% ABV
  • Bottle: 6/12/18

Allmost 3 weeks in the bottle, head and carb great, mouthfeel very good, light honey color (Maris), and drinking rather early the Citra dry hop is sensational, supported by the more subtle fruit characters of Simcoe and Cascade. Malt/hop balance could not be better.

A satisfying hot xmas day midstregth drinker.

Cheers

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90m@62c. Mash out 78c. No sparge. 24L start for 14L finish in the no-chill cube. Cooled in trough to 40c then left ambient o/night.

Cheers

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I will have to add something like this to my list. All the low alcohol beers I have made have been Miles or Amber Ales and mashed high. But sometimes you just want an easy beer to throw back in summer.

I was at the basketball yesterday watching the Kings choke against Melbourne and I had a James Squire Mid River. Everyone bags out the James Squire beers but this was a really pleasant and refreshing beer.

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Nice looking drop WortHog. 😎

Nice use of malt types, & a very likeable & well constructed hop schedule.

Well done & enjoy!

Cheers,

Lusty.

Edited by Beerlust
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Might give it a go myself with some tweaks to better suit my tastes. I'm thinking replace the Carapils with 200g medium crystal and mashing at 66-67 to keep a bit more body in the beer. 

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55 minutes ago, Otto Von Blotto said:

....and mashing at 66-67 to keep a bit more body in the beer. 

See, this is what I  don't know,  Kelsey, being a novice. Would that be for 90m or 60m? Thanks for your comments.

Cheers

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Worthog, it’s actually a really well designed beer for something that is low strength and easy to drink.

Mashing higher will leave more unfermentable sugars in the beer so it will finish at a higher sg. As it’s a little sweeter, you’ll need to adjust with bitterness.

Carapils will give you body and a touch of sweetness, crystal will give you more sweetness and more colour and different caramel flavours. Carapils also helps with head retention. It’s also called carafoam. 

Carapils is crystal malt but it’s at the lower end of crystal. 

Hope that helps.

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Also 60m mash is usually enough. Most of the conversion will happen in the first 15-20 mins. 

There are some recipes that call for a longer mash. I’m just saying as a general rule.

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1 hour ago, Worthog said:

See, this is what I  don't know,  Kelsey, being a novice. Would that be for 90m or 60m? Thanks for your comments.

Cheers

You could do either, but usually you see longer mash times for the lower temps. It creates a more fermentable wort as shown by your 1.007 FG. If you mashed at 66-67 for 90 minutes, the wort would be a little more fermentable than if it was mashed for 60 minutes, because the beta amylase has longer to work, and it's slower at this temperature. Low 60s is where it performs best. 

I mash lagers at 62-63 degrees but only for 40 minutes, no crystal or carapils in them and they finish around 1.010-1.011. Granted, the amount of grain is larger as these beers are around 5% ABV, which will contribute to a higher FG, but the shorter time at the low temp creates a bit less fermentable wort than it would be if mashed longer. 

 

 

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If you Mash around 67-69 degrees then you can get away with a 30 minute mash. A good time saver.

You will end up with a full bodied beer though.

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On 12/24/2018 at 9:41 PM, The Captain1525230099 said:

Carapils is crystal malt but it’s at the lower end of crystal.

Technically it's actually classed as a "dextrin" malt & has little in the way of sweetness.

Understanding Carapils

If you are happy with the malt character, flavour, & colour of your beer, but are unhappy with it's head retention, then this is the grain for you.

Cheers,

Lusty.

Edited by Beerlust
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I am looking at doing something like this soon. Smashing down several 6.5% IPAs on a hot day can make you remember not going to bed...

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45 minutes ago, Beerlust said:

Technically it's actually classed as a "dextrin" malt & has little in the way of sweetness.

Understanding Carapils

If you are happy with the malt character, flavour, & colour of your beer, but are unhappy with it's head retention, then this is the grain for you.

Cheers,

Lusty.

Good read Lusty, thanks for that.

I think it’s a widely confused term. Ive really got to get my hand on that malt book........

Edited by The Captain1525230099
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Hiya Captain. 🙂

I admit I was for a long time. I think it's because it is often referenced in a chart that displays the various "specialty" malts (mainly crystal type) listed in terms of colour depth. Because it has "Cara" in it's title, it is assumed to be a crystal malt. The British use "crystal" + malt as their tag, the yanks as usual have to be difficult & different & use "Cara" + malt as theirs.

I can't believe in the modern world the yanks still talk in ounces, inches, & pounds. 🙄

Cheers,

Lusty.

Edited by Beerlust
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6 minutes ago, Ronnie Dale said:

Ounces, inches and pounds to difficult for you?

it's just a PITA converting it.

Given most of the rest of the world is comfortably working in Metric & has been for quite some time now, I do find it odd America who constantly boast claims to be at the forefront of modern ideals/technology etc. is still stuck in the past in this area.

Lusty.

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I find it amusing that a lot of American professional brewers use grams for hop additions. Obviously it’s more precise. 

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The U S uses the metric system more than you would think.  I left Florida 25? years ago and all road works were bid per meter or metre.  Car speedometers have both miles and kilometers.  Engineering use metric.  Wine, whiskey and soda above 749 ml are sold in metric units, below that is ounces.  The food industry uses metric and British.  Home food is difficult to transform 350 million people to.

As far as precision, that boils down to the equipment and people who use it.

As for the metric system, it does not include celsius, litre or hectare.  How many people know what an are is?

My phone, computer and tv screen in Australia are measured in inches.  My tires / tyres are in inches and when I check the air in them in it shown in pounds.  Most people I know give their height in feet and inches.

The world oil market is traded in U S Gallons, 42 of them per barrel.  Which is the answer to the universe.

I feel like Kelsey.

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