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diygal

Using 1.7/1.8 kg recipes with the Craft beer kit

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I am yet to try this but logic dictates the following:

There appears 2 ways to make beer for DIY  Craft beer smaller tanks.

1. If using Coopers Craft 1.3 kg recipes – don’t add extra sugar in tank as sugar already mixed into the recipe.

Costs approx Aus $1 per 740 ml bottle

2. If using other 1.7 – 1.8 kg recipes - then split into exactly 2 halves & store one half in air tight sterilised container in fridge for future batch. Use other half to make brew. Use stored half as soon as first half is bottled.

When ready to brew recipe, mix in tank and add 500 g sugar.

Will need to obtain & add yeast to second half of recipe as recipes only come with one serving of yeast.  Use brewing yeast only.

Costs approx Aus $0.50c per 740 ml bottle.

Hope this helps.

Would love to hear the results from anyone who tries this halving recipe.

Edited by diygal

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1.3 kg recipe already has assumed 0.5 kg sugar mixed in so malt recipe is only 0.8 kg recipe.

1.7 kg recipe is only malt & no sugar which is suitable to make twice as much (850 g halved) beer but need to add 0.5 kg of sugar to each halved recipe.

diygal

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You'd get a better beer using dry malt instead of sugar. But the basic process is pretty much how it's done. If you use a 1.7kg kit and halve it you can just glad wrap the tin and store it in the fridge. It'll be fine for the couple of weeks or so it takes for the batch to ferment and be bottled. Just don't halve the yeast, better to pitch it all than store open packages of it. Simply scoop some out into a sterilised jar after bottling and pitch that into the second batch to save buying more yeast.

Others have had success using full 1.7kg kits and nothing else brewed to 10-11 litres. Or they're pimped a bit with some hop additions. 

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There are many different types of sugar. Malt extract contains sugar in the form of maltose, which yeast ferments. It also leaves behind a bit of malt flavour and body in the beer. Using large amounts of something like table sugar leaves a thin, watery beer and sometimes leaves it tasting cidery if the fermentation temp is too high. 18-20 degrees is a good temp for most ale brews.

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