Jump to content
BlueBru

Green Bottles

Recommended Posts

I have been pondering this question this afternoon. 

If brown bottles are generally used for beer to keep out light, then why are most lighter beers, like Lager, in green bottles? Is it something to do with the light in the northern hemisphere, where lagers originated?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why are bottles Green?
This was because the clear glass allowed UV rays to penetrate the beer and alter the flavour. The solution was turning bottles brown, a darker colour which would block out the rays.
After World War II, green bottles also became popular due to a shortage of brown glass.
 
I've never really wondered about it enough to look up why, but that's it apparently.
I only use green bottles for lager and cider.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought that green bottles let in more light too. 

Cans being no light, Brown next best, Green after that then Clear. 

Anecdotal really if you’re storing them in a cupboard or boxes. And drinking them in a reasonable time frame. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a commercial retail environment beer is often exposed to long periods of bright light & UV light due to being stored on shelves & on open displays. A beer housed in a clear or lighter coloured bottle that allows the light to pass through makes the beer contained in it more susceptible to "skunking" that is an accelerated degradation of the original beer flavour & aroma that can come across as quite unpleasant. Skunking does take a reasonably lengthy time under these conditions before it surfaces in the beer though.

In a home brewing environment as long as you store your beer away from a direct bright light source, it won't matter what colour bottles you have your beer in, they'll be fine. 😉

Cheers,

Lusty.

Edited by Beerlust

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the commercial beers in clear and green bottles use tetra hops. These hops do not contain the compound that creates skunking when exposed to UV light.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×