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Swing top bottles


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I recently acquired a bunch of swing tops that are nice and dirty on the outside but had been rinsed properly before being put away 3 years ago. mos of the bottles were stored closed tight some were stored open. I closed the open ones and filled my laundry sink with sanitising solution. I washed the outsides off nice and clean and then opened them and sunk them into a new batch of sani brew and let them soak. I started this all last night, and I figure that a good 24hour soak should be plenty to get them clean.

 

I've spent the last 4 evenings or so reading on this forum and I'm 20 pages into the Homebrew happenings section. I've read pretty much all of the posts in the threads on those 20 pages and have learned quite a bit from it. I know there's a search function, I just figure there's not that much posted here that I really need it right now. I'll just sit here and drink a few beers and read through everything I can find on the site. I just thought I'd let you guys know I'm onto you...especially you PB2, oh and Thirsty you're hilarious sometimes, I think I'm going to get along with you guys really well.

 

I forgot about my question when I went rambling on there about my little cleaning project. What is the best way to store swing tops when not filled with beer. Filled with beer is obviously the best method of storage though [biggrin]

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G'day Slurtis, welcome to the Brewers Guild!

 

Store swingtops with the ceramic/plastic cap in place, minus the rubber seal.

 

Might be worth checking the volume of them, too. Grolsch, for example, have been sold in Aus (over the years) in 500ml, 473ml and 450ml variants.

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It's a bit of a mixed bag of bottle volumes, some are Grolsch bottles and close to 500 ml and others are EZ cap brand (Made in the USA) 500ml and some others are larger at 660ml. I'm going to give bulk priming a go for the first time in a week or so when my current brews are ready for the bottle. It should take the guesswork out of the odd volume bottling. The seals all look like they're in pretty good shape. I hope I can find replacements when they are shot though...

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Might be worth checking the volume of them' date=' too. Grolsch, for example, have been sold in Aus (over the years) in 500ml, 473ml and 450ml variants.[/quote']

 

Not to mention the nice, large, 1.5 litre variety which I have.

 

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Might be worth checking the volume of them' date=' too. Grolsch, for example, have been sold in Aus (over the years) in 500ml, 473ml and 450ml variants.[/quote']

 

Not to mention the nice, large, 1.5 litre variety which I have.

 

I have a friend that got one of those for his birthday, I want to steal the bottle but everytime I go over to his house it is still untouched! he says beer gives him a bad hangover...Naturally I offered to drink it for him but he declined.I guess I'll just have to buy 15 of them at the liquor store so that I have enough to bottle a batch into. That there would be a serious 15 pack of beer!

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I recently purchased 24 bottles that are swing tops(new) and they are 740ml, once i have them all top attached i expect i'll have to buy many more(probably another 48) so that i may mature any brews i do for both myself and my guests.

I must say though that they are expensive and i think coopers stubbies and tallies should be the old crown top for home brewing making it much easier for enthusiasts.

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...and i think coopers stubbies and tallies should be the old crown top for home brewing making it much easier for enthusiasts.

 

The Coopers tallies/longnecks are already crown top and bullet proof. They are intended for home brewing. [cool]

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The Coopers tallies/longnecks are already crown top and bullet proof. They are intended for home brewing. [cool]

 

Amen to that..they are amazing!

 

I am luck enough to get some old crown top bottles through ebay. Even tho it is a bit of pain washing and cleaning dirty old bottles, they are worth it and I want some more. They are truely intended for home brewing as Muddy said.

 

It seems to me that a lot of brewers still prefer glass crown top bottles compared to PET. Is this true?

 

I need more crown top. Will Coopers sell new crown top bottles?

 

 

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The majority of new brewers are happy with PET.

 

We continue to sell Original Pale Ale, Sparkling Ale and Best Extra Stout in sturdy, re-usable 750ml glass bottles. [biggrin]

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Haha. Good marketing Paul for the of the shelve stuffs. Never the less I cannot afford to buy too many too many bottles form the local bottle-o, since they are charging me 5 to 6 gold coins per bottle.

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I wish I could buy the Cooper's long necks here. I can take a 4hr drive and buy some in the big city [annoyed] I've been buying Grolsch Lager in the 450 ml swing top bottles when I'm feeling rich. I'm going to buy enough PET to hold a couple of brews soon, they will be designated camping beers and experimental brew holders. I like that I can easily degas the PET if I've bottled at not quite FG [rightful]

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If my calculations are correct I worked out 5.12 gram priming sugar per 640ml bottle. If I put 6 gram is it too much? what is the best way of bulk priming?

 

Jerry, I just started bulk priming ant it is way easier in my opinion. I use dextrose to prime and I read somewhere on the site that 9 grams per liter is the correct amount. Now that I can open and drink the first batch I've bulk primed I can tell you that I feel 9 grams of dex per liter is too much. I'm going to knock it back to 8 grams per liter on my next batch.

 

As for the method what I do is;

 

-Measure out my priming sugar with a kitchen scale.

-Boil a small amount of water on the stove (about 2 cups)

-after water has been at hard boil for a few minutes I dissolve the dex in it and cool it to room temp.

-While my sugar is cooling I sanitize my bottling bucket

-Now I siphon the beer into the bucket, make sure that your siphon hose is sanitized and reaches the bottom of your bottling bucket.

-when there's a bit of beer in the bottom of the bucket I add my sugar water, I slosh the beer around gently to mix the sugar in. I've also stirred gently with my big mixing spoon to ensure that the sugar is evenly mixed in.

 

Now the beer is ready to put in bottles of every shape and size with no worries of measure the correct amount of sugar for each different capacity.

 

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I've been using a couple of metres of food grade plastic tubing with about 5-6 cm of a little bottler tube stuck in each end. Then you put one end into the spigot of the primary fermenter and the other end into the spigot of your other fermenter/bucket.

 

Next I turn on the second fermenter's spigot and then turn on the primary one's and as long as your second container is below the first the beer flows beautifully. You just have to make sure the destination bucker is lower and it works really well.

 

You can rotate the second spigot 90 degrees and have it flow along the bottom of the container so it doesn't aerate the incoming brew.

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I use the same method as Sven above.

 

I like the fact that I don't have to put the hose in the fermentor so there is less chance of infection - It is much easier just to make sure the inside of the hose is clean (plus it works better IMO than putting the hose - It mixes better)

 

[cool]

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I'll have to try a variation of that method when I'm bottling tomorrow night. I only have one bucket with a tap, but I have a good idea [ninja] Also I think I'd like to retract my statement about dex priming amounts, 9 grams is good when the beer is really cold, but a little gassy when not far off of room temp. I guess that part is a personal preference...

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