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MartyG1525230263

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MartyG1525230263 last won the day on August 25

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  1. Yea, I drive. I just thought you may have wanted to shoot up to sunny QLD for the arvo ...
  2. Also great for removing the labels from glass bottles if they are left to soak in a perc solution for a few days they usually just come away in the solution ...
  3. well it is called a "cold crash" not a "cold moderately fast" the crash sort of, no definitely, implies done at speed ...
  4. if you use Headmaster glasses no-one will ever complain about flat beer ...
  5. Yep with free postage, on ebay ... InkBird 308 I use and love it .... the inkbird 310 is dearer but is programmable so that you can monitor it by wireless and set other features like temp increases for diacetyl rest for lagers and temp drops for cold crashing ... so basically can set and forget ...
  6. @BlackSands but are you not in freezing NZ where ambient is 8 degrees on the best of days ? In a normal climate like sunny Queensland where Kelsey and i live it is always 28 and sunny so the fridge takes longer to get to near freezing. For you to get to near freezing you use a heat belt.
  7. @worry wort far enough .... I must admit that I was a bit skeptical about temp control ... when I restarted brewing a couple of years ago I just fell back into the methods I used when I started brewing in the late 80's and served me well then, or so I thought. I was of the school of thought, much the same as yours, that as long as it stayed within the range of temps in the instruction all was good. So if the days were 24 and the night 16 so what. I would use an infrared thermometer to check the wort temp several times a day and regulate it with damp towels if it was getting too high and wrap it in a blankets if it was getting too cold at night. I thought nothing of a 5 degree swing over 24 hours ... but following the advice of those on here I invested in an InkBird for $48 and picked up a free fridge, the change in the quality of my beer was incredible ... I set the temp variance to +/- 0.2 and my beer just went to a whole new level ... the taste profile was so clean ... I suppose it is a persoanl thing but temp control followed by kegging was the best thing that i have done ... however, there is 100% no doubt that highly accurate temp control is not compulsory however, temperature oscilllations of a few degrees daily 100% impact the flavour profile ...
  8. I suppose it depends on what the outcome is you want. I no longer use a flocc agent as I harvest all my yeasts and for some reason it seems logical to me to have a yeast cake which is all brewing by products ... I like clear beer but now that I keg I crash for a few days then keg and store in the kegger so it is also crashing in the keg which is the logic I use ... my beer is not crystal clear but suits me now but I suppose this raises a question can I use a floccing agent in the keg which will also harden any sediment that falls while in the keg ? When I bottled I was really quite anal about clarity so I crashed for longer and the bottles aged for several months before drinking so clarity was great ... I suppose the issue with kegs is I am not letting them age as long as i don't have to and the beer is just not quite crystal clear but boy is it good ...
  9. I learned a good lesson with this: I had a fail with the 2001 Urquell Yeast that I have been longing to make a Pils with ... I take full responsibility for it, The OG was toward the high end at 1056ish and I was a bit impatient and pitched the yeast a bit early then dropped it to ferment temp too early and it took 4 days to start ferment and 3 weeks to get to FV ... so the under pitch has created a Pils that is way to strong in aldehyde and was bloody terrible however as with all things aldehyde the lagering process has dramatically reduced their impact, they are still there but with a dash of lemonade it is nearly passable ... hopefully as it lagers further I may save this baby it will not taste anything like what i wanted but hopefully I don't have to throw it out ... so it will sit in the keg fridge for a while yet and I will have a bottle of lemonade handy . I have always loved a shandy as a hair of the dog or on a hot day anyway.
  10. As the old saying goes if it moves it is biology and if it smells it is chemistry so maybe, just maybe, your fermenter is not as clean as it could be. As a general sort of practice the fermenters that I use regularly, of which I have 2, are never empty ... if not in the ferment fridge with an active brew they are sitting full with a tap water Sodium Perc solution waiting for their next run ... as I use one I replace it with the sterile one that way I am always using a clean sterile FV ... then the one that just came out of the ferment fridge has the yeast harvested, is cleaned and filled with the H20 Na2CO3 solution ... so I get no bad smell residue ...
  11. I generally don't stick my head in my fermenter. Do you do it often?
  12. So @worry wort you have been brewing for 40 years and you don't use temp control? I would assume that a guy with your experience would be all over that. Maybe it is time to take the fridge and inkBird leap?
  13. strange that you were all making the same colour beer what a coincidence ...
  14. My 1st incarnation as a brew was 30 years ago and i don't recall too many LHBS with hops and all the other goodies being readily sold. Or am I wrong and just did not notice? At the time just made one of the Coopers cans and used a kilo of white sugar in an open FV covered with a tea towel with no hydrometer at ambient and the beer only tasted great after a year in the bottle. I now know why because it was crap. Aging it that long took all the aldehydes and other shite out of it and made it drinkable. Oh those were the days!
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